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Oliver Platt - Sunday 7th June 2009 at Radio City Music Hall New York City, USA

Oliver Platt
Oliver Platt

Lauren Graham and Oliver Platt Tuesday 12th May 2009 Unveiling of the Lauren Graham and Oliver Platt Wall of Fame caricatures at Sardi's Broadway restaurant New York City, USA

Lauren Graham and Oliver Platt
Lauren Graham and Oliver Platt
Oliver Platt (left), Lauren Graham and Oliver Platt
Lauren Graham and Oliver Platt
Lauren Graham and Oliver Platt
Lauren Graham and Oliver Platt

Frost/Nixon Review


Essential
If there's a single misstep in Ron Howard's expertly calibrated Frost/Nixon, it eluded me.

Howard's spellbinding adaptation of Peter Morgan's Tony-nominated stage drama understands the politics that manipulate Washington and Hollywood. It comprehends how many interviews are won and lost long before the Q&A begins. It figures out the best way to transition an airtight theatrical production to the roomier silver screen (giving the elements plenty of room to breathe). And -- most importantly -- it illustrates the intimidating power of television, which creates and destroys legacies on a daily basis.

Continue reading: Frost/Nixon Review

Oliver Platt - Monday 17th November 2008 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Oliver Platt
Oliver Platt

Oliver Platt - Wednesday 15th October 2008 at Odeon Leicester Square London, England

Oliver Platt
Oliver Platt and Kevin Bacon
Oliver Platt and Kevin Bacon
Oliver Platt
Oliver Platt and Kevin Bacon
Oliver Platt

Oliver Platt Wednesday 15th October 2008 The Times BFI London Film Festival - Premiere of Frost/Nixon - Arrivals London, England

Oliver Platt
Oliver Platt
Oliver Platt
Oliver Platt and Kevin Bacon
Oliver Platt and Kevin Bacon
Oliver Platt

Oliver Platt and Hank Azaria - Oliver Platt & Hank Azaria Monday 3rd December 2007 at Times Square New York City, USA

Oliver Platt and Hank Azaria
Oliver Platt
Oliver Platt
Oliver Platt and Hank Azaria
Oliver Platt
Oliver Platt

Martian Child Review


Weak
Who's your daddy? John Cusack, from the looks of things.

In films released this year, the actor has played a divorced dad mourning his daughter's death in a haunted hotel room (1408) and a single father of two whose wife is killed while serving in Iraq (Grace Is Gone). Either Cusack is gravitating toward these roles because they quench a sudden paternal yearning or Hollywood casting agents collectively have decided he's finally the right age to play a parent.

Continue reading: Martian Child Review

The Ten Review


Very Good
In a sane, level-headed and clear-eyed world, early '90s sketch group The State (also a TV show) would still be practicing their ambitious and absurd brand of screwball comedy. Sadly, Scooter Libby gets fresh air and sunshine while the boys and girls of The State have been relegated to obscurity, scattering like cockroaches in a well-lit kitchen to different comedic prospects. Most of the members found their way to Comedy Central's cannily-hilarious Reno 911! where State leads Thomas Lennon, Ben Garant, and Kerri Kenney are series cornerstones. Almost every other member of the troupe has made a recurring or cameo spot on the program but the effect has never been as lively or precarious as the best moments of The State.

With a few celebrities on board, the group assembles (with a few exceptions) for key member David Wain's The Ten, a foul-mouthed, dirty-as-diapers, Republican-baiting retelling of the Ten Commandments. The stories are stitched together by a loose narrative thread involving a man (Paul Rudd) serving as narrator who is leaving his wife (Famke Janssen) for a younger ditz (Jessica Alba).

Continue reading: The Ten Review

Gun Shy (2000) Review


Weak
Had your fill of nutty mobsters in Analyze This, Panic, and The Sopranos? Well, here's a nutty undercover cop who sees a support group for mental help. See the difference?

Continue reading: Gun Shy (2000) Review

Loverboy Review


Bad
Much like Robert Towne's recent adaptation of Ask the Dust, Kevin Bacon's Loverboy is a labor of love. Sometime in 2003, Kyra Sedgwick (Bacon's spouse) handed him a copy of Victoria Redel's novel, Loverboy, and both found themselves eager to bring the story to the screen. And similar to Towne's effort, Bacon is so enthusiastic about the material that he can't get his concentration correct.

Emily Stoll (Sedgwick) is in her late 20s and roaming the Midwest and just about everywhere else for the right ejaculate. After a miscarriage from a "no father," multi-partner pregnancy, she meets Paul (Campbell Scott) and in one night of passion, a child is conceived. The son, Paul aka Loverboy (Dominic Scott Kay), quickly becomes Emily's entire life, trying to make life a magical, ongoing discovery. Emily has nightmarish flashbacks of her lovebird parents (Bacon and Marisa Tomei) who were too busy being in love to take care of a child properly, and she daydreams of her fantasy mother, Mrs. Harker (Sandra Bullock). Loverboy eventually becomes wise to his mother's obsessive grasp on him and begins to revolt, especially when she tries to seduce Mark (Matt Dillon), a father figure. This, of course, can't end well.

Continue reading: Loverboy Review

Ash Wednesday Review


Weak
Ed Burns is Irish. Hope that's clear. Irish people, in the world of Burns, anyway, are devout Catholics, hang out in bars constantly, and tend to become embroiled in scenarios with gangsters that end up with various members of the community shot dead. Burns' ponderation on all of this never really merited a theatrical release, and suffering through its slow silliness makes it immediately apparent why. Never mind that Elijah Wood and Rosario Dawson are the least likely couple in history, the entire plot is so absurd it borders on asinine. Turns out the "assassinated" Wood isn't really dead. He's been hiding in Ed's apartment for three years. One night he sneaks out, gets spotted, and the mafia's back on his trail. Ed's solution is to get Wood and his wife (who doesn't even know he's alive) out of town. But they don't just hop in the car. They go to endless lengths to talk about it, including dropping into a bar or two to mull over this great plan over a beer. Now that's good thinking, Ed! In the end, they all pretty much get what they deserve.

Casanova Review


Very Good
Hey, guys. Are you having trouble with the ladies? Got your eye on that cute cocktail waitress at your local bar, but aren't sure how to make a move? In love with that gorgeous female coworker who still doesn't know you exist? Have a crush on that hot chick who sits next to you in chemistry class, but fear you don't have what it takes to score? If so, look no further, because Venice's most notorious womanizer is here to show you all the right moves.

Call him an 18th century Hitch, if you will -- he's Casanova (Heath Ledger), and he has so many admirers he doesn't need to sleep with the same woman more than once, and seldom does. How does he do it? Is it his uncanny charm? His undeniable charisma? His stunning good looks? His fashionable wardrobe? Who knows? But what whatever he's doing, it definitely works.

Continue reading: Casanova Review

The Ice Harvest Review


Good
Harold Ramis hasn't been kind to his own reputation in the last few years. One of the few uncontested great comedy filmmakers, he's diluted his resume with serviceable but still watery products like Bedazzled and the unfortunate duology of Analyze This and Analyze That. So while his newest, the Christmas noir comedy The Ice Harvest isn't Ramis's best work, it's also the sharpest thing he's done since Groundhog Day and hopefully the sign of more interesting things to come.

With a heart as black as exhaust-stained slush, The Ice Harvest is based on a novel by that jolliest of writers, Scott Phillips (A Simple Plan). Taking place over one long, frozen and grimy Christmas Eve in Wichita, it all starts with Charlie Arglist (John Cusack), a lawyer for the local crime syndicate, handing off a bag to his cohort, Vic Cavanaugh (Billy Bob Thornton), the bag containing over $2 million they stole from the Kansas City boss, Bill Guerrard (Randy Quaid). Vic hides the money and he and Arglist split up for the night, aiming to get the hell out of town in the morning. Being a noir patsy, Arglist proceeds to drink, draw far too much attention to himself, flirt with the local fatale (Connie Nielsen, dead wrong for the job at hand), and get more and more suspicious about Vic's motives. Paranoia ensues when one of Guerrard's gunsels starts poking around the seedy joints that Arglist has been hanging out in.

Continue reading: The Ice Harvest Review

Hope Springs Review


Weak
Not to be confused with Hope Floats, the Hope in Hope Springs is a small town, and the springs in question is a noun.

Hope Springs brings us the direct-to-video story of a U.K. artist (Colin Firth), who recently has been dumped by stuffy fiancee Minnie Driver. He jets to the U.S. to seek solace in the town of Hope, promptly finding the much different, free-spirited Heather Graham as his new muse. It's only a matter of time before Minnie's back in the picture... who will he end up with?

Continue reading: Hope Springs Review

Bulworth Review


Good
You know, I've seen Network before, and it's a much better film.

Bulworth is, in the kindest of words, an "homage" to that picture, and at least it has an excellent role model. Simply take the story about a TV newsman who goes nuts, stirs up controversy, and fatally angers the establishment and change it to a US Senator who does the same thing, and you've got Bulworth.

Continue reading: Bulworth Review

Simon Birch Review


OK
One scarcely knows where to begin to elucidate the tragic story of Simon Birch, but suffice it to say that Simon is a 12-year-old dwarf imbued with an astonishing sense of morality and heroism that affects everyone around him. The Triumph of the Kid has never been more overwrought, and Simon Birch just takes movies like Radio Flyer, The Mighty, and Unstrung Heroes and ratchets them out to the hilt. Pithy and over-emotional, watch little Simon (Ian Michael Smith) wreck the school play, try to play baseball, ogle girls' chests, and save the entire student body from drowning in an icy river. Then go vomit. Jim Carrey makes a (poor) cameo. Also note that the film is based on author John Irving's A Prayer for Owen Meany. Irving also wrote the book responsible for that ungodly piece of junk The Cider House Rules.

Ready To Rumble Review


Excellent
Wrestling - for all of its flash pots, Solid Gold dancers, and large, scantily clad, sweaty men - is the 21st century version of Ringing Bros., Barnum and Bailey's traveling tent show. When I was a kid, I used to watch the exploits of Andre the Giant, Macho Man Randy Savage, and the Honky Tonk Man. The newest generation of wrestlers have never interested me, with all of the theatrics and bad, bad attitudes toward almost everything under the sun. The "sport" of wrestling has become three hours of anger, deception, sexual dominance, and violent acts with chairs. The one thing that has always eluded me with the newest generation of wrestlers - Goldberg, Sting, Mankind, and The Rock - is the human element that drew me into the action so well as a kid. But Ready to Rumble helped remind me of the glory days I once had, sitting before the 13-inch RCA with the bottom knob broken off, watching my heroes triumph over the adversities of life's travels.

The film follow two losers, played by Scott Caan and David Arquette, who run a septic truck business for the local town of Lusk, Wyoming. Their idol is Jimmy King (Oliver Platt), grand champion belt holder of the WCW Federation, who proclaims "I WILL RULE YOU!" after every victory. Caan and Arquette attend a WCW bout and, in horror, watch their idol fall from grace by turncoat WCW wrestlers. Jimmy King is beaten to a bloody pulp and a fellow wrestler, Diamond Dallas Page, takes the belt from the fallen king. After the show, Caan and Arquette strike out to find their defeated hero and once again place the crown upon the rightful king of the ring.

Continue reading: Ready To Rumble Review

Lake Placid Review


OK
It's crocodile season, opening the hunting period on an animal that has been woefully underused in the horror movie litany to date. But unlike most horror/thriller pics, this one features a script by David E. Kelley, best known as the creator of TV's Ally McBeal.

So there's some promise here. But does this monster movie rise above recent crap like Anaconda or Jaws 3-D? A little. It's better than Anaconda, anyway.

Continue reading: Lake Placid Review

Diggstown Review


Good
Hardly awful, Diggstown combines two of my favorite movie elements: boxing and con games. Woods and Dern make well-matched hustlers, outdoing one another over a bet as to whether an aging boxer (Gossett) can beat ten local men in the boxing ring inside of 24 hours. Throw in an early Heather Graham appearance and I'll go the distance with this one.

The Impostors Review


Very Good
A charming and funny farce, obviously the brainchild of Tucci on peyote (or something akin), The Impostors lacks the magic of a film like Big Night, but still makes you smile plenty. A host of indie regulars round out the cast, which features Platt and Tucci as hapless actors stranded on a cruise liner.

Bicentennial Man Review


Good
Robin Williams wants -- and needs -- nothing more than to have his own The Truman Show -- a Hail Mary to ward off permanent stereotyping. Typecast as a goofy loudmouth in throwaway films ranging from Mrs. Doubtfire to Fathers' Day to Flubber, you have to look back all the way to The Fisher King in 1991 for his last great starring role.

Bicentennial Man aims to turn that all around by making Williams something we can relate to once again. Ironically, that's not as a human: It's as a robot.

Continue reading: Bicentennial Man Review

Executive Decision Review


OK
For those action film fans who think that Steven Seagal is indestructible, I highly recommend you see Executive Decision, a cheese-o-rama of an action flick that gives Seagal seventh billing and a quick ride to Action Hero Heaven.

No, this is not a "Steven Seagal Movie." It's a "Kurt Russell Movie"--the New Kurt Russell, the tough-yet-vulnerable Kurt Russell, the Kurt Russell a la Bruce Willis-type with whom we're about to be deluged, like it or not (answer: probably not).

Continue reading: Executive Decision Review

Gun Shy Review


Weak
Had your fill of nutty mobsters in Analyze This, Panic, and The Sopranos? Well, here's a nutty undercover cop who sees a support group for mental help. See the difference?

Continue reading: Gun Shy Review

Kinsey Review


Excellent
In 1948, Alfred Kinsey, a goofy-looking professor from Indiana University previously known (if at all) for his long and laborious study of gull wasps, published Sexual Behavior in the American Male, and the country was never the same. For years, Kinsey had been trekking across the country with his team of researchers, interviewing and studying thousands of people about their sexual attitudes and behavior. His book was the result of this survey, and it tried to prove to Americans - many of whom were starting to believe the Cold War propaganda of conformity being forced upon them - that their fellow citizens were much more sexually diverse (and perverse) than had ever been previously thought.

In Kinsey, writer/director Bill Condon (Gods and Monsters) makes all this into a divertingly fresh story about a scientific crusader who was just too honest and inquisitive for his own good. But rather than taking a straightforward biographical approach, Condon fortunately makes the film a character study of Kinsey himself, wisely placing star Liam Neeson front and center. The film opens in black and white, Neeson quizzing his researchers on how best to interview a subject for the study. He's forthright, strong-willed and oddly provocative - you'd give up your life story to this guy in about ten seconds.

Continue reading: Kinsey Review

Pieces Of April Review


OK
Reviewing Pieces of April brings up a metaphysical question: What do you say about a movie that's not really there? April has several moments of note, quiet, sad bits of truth that feel like they've just come in out of the rain. Pieces, in other words. But writer/director Peter Hedges doesn't give them any larger purpose beyond themselves, and, as a result, his film is a flock of good intentions without somewhere to land.

It's Thanksgiving Day and April Burns (Katie Holmes) has invited her estranged family in from suburban Pennsylvania to her tiny Manhattan apartment for holiday dinner. April shares the flat with her boyfriend Bobby (Derek Luke) a generous partner with sloppy taste in friends. Her parents Jim and Joy (Oliver Platt and Patricia Clarkson) and siblings Beth and Timmy (Alison Pill and John Gallagher Jr.) are less than thrilled about the idea, having given up on April and her new piercing/tattoo/boyfriend lifestyle a long time ago. But Joy is in the advanced stages of a terminal illness. Without saying it too loudly, the family knows that if Mom and April don't at least try to reconcile, later may be too late. Everyone piles into a station wagon and off they go.

Continue reading: Pieces Of April Review

Doctor Dolittle (1998) Review


Very Good
If I could talk to the animals, I'd be a millionnaire... I wouldn't be locked up in the loony bin.

Continue reading: Doctor Dolittle (1998) Review

Don't Say A Word Review


Weak
Surrounded by hype, high hopes, and the promise of an over-the-top performance by Clueless's Brittany Murphy, Don't Say a Word looked full of promise. Hell, when I hear that "I'll never tell" whisper on the TV commercial, goose bumps run up my spine.

Alas, Word is filled with little but disappointment, a kooky mix of Girl, Interrupted and Ransom, with Michael Douglas and company collecting a paycheck to plod through a vapid and dull kidnapping thriller.

Continue reading: Don't Say A Word Review

Three To Tango Review


Weak
How will Three to Tango be remembered?

Maybe as another Matthew Perry star vehicle where he doesn't come off as particularly funny? Maybe as another Neve Campbell movie where she sounds whiny and unlikable? Or perhaps it will be as a borderline offensive straight-guy-mistaken-as-gay movie, heavy on the cliches and light on the laughs.

Continue reading: Three To Tango Review

Pieces Of April Review


OK

"Pieces of April" is a Murphy's-Law Thanksgiving comedy in which both the meal and the movie have a hard time coming together.

Saddled with a handful of sitcomy plot contrivances that leave it struggling with its own mediocrity, the film's quirkiness never quite evolves into cleverness as it follows a pretty young punkette (Katie Holmes) through a day of near-disasters, and her uneasy suburban family on their long, reluctant car trip to her graffiti-encrusted Lower East Side walk-up for what they're sure will be a calamity of a holiday meal with their absconded black sheep.

While the nervous, habitually irresponsible April (Holmes) is banging on doors and meeting eccentric, snooty and non-English-speaking neighbors in a desperate search for a working oven (her own had served only as a cabinet until this morning, when she discovered it was dead), the girl's mom (Patricia Clarkson), dad (Oliver Platt), grandma (Alice Drummond) and teenage siblings are squeezed into a station wagon and getting on each other's last nerves.

Continue reading: Pieces Of April Review

Don't Say A Word Review


Weak

A standard-issue kiddie-kidnapping adrenaline thriller, "Don't Say a Word" has a single reason for being -- one fertile, previously untapped plot hook that goes completely to waste in the hands of director Gary Fleder.

The hook: The kidnappers want a nugget of information locked away in the head of a delusional teenage mental patient (Brittany Murphy), and they snatch an Upper West Side psychologist's 8-year-old daughter to force him to help.

But the movie (based on a book by Andrew Klavan) pays little more than lip service to the logistics of such a demand. Even though no doctor has been able to get through to her in 10 years, this shrink (Michael Douglas) garners the crazy girl's trust in a matter of hours -- thus negating the only fresh element in the entire script.

Continue reading: Don't Say A Word Review

Bicentennial Man Review


Bad

Warning: This is not going to be an unbiased movie review. I think you should know right now that I've had it up to my eyeballs with Robin Williams' superficial brand of sentimentality.

For the last several years he's been making mostly movies like "Jack," "Patch Adams" and "Jakob the Liar," in which he does a little contractually obligated schtick then bat his eyes madly, trying his darndest to make us cry.

"Bicentennial Man" is more of the same, the only significant difference being in this picture his eyelids make a motorized hum every time he bats, because in "Bicentennial Man" Williams plays a robot. A robot who wants to be human.

Continue reading: Bicentennial Man Review

Three To Tango Review


Weak

For a romantic comedy with a pilfered plot, one-note personalities and a story outline so obvious a monkey could predict every scene, "Three To Tango" is surprisingly agreeable -- up to a point.

The movie stars "Friends" zinger king Matthew Perry as an architect and consummate kiss-ass who, for the sake of scoring a major project, agrees to babysit the beautiful mistress (Neve Campbell) of a married tycoon (Dylan McDermott), who is afraid of losing his pretty fling's affections to another man.

Except for milk-it-for-cheap-laughs gimmick that McDermott thinks Perry is gay, the plot is almost an act-for-act match of "For Love or Money," a terminally cute 1993 prime-time escape vehicle for Michael J. Fox, who played a Manhattan concierge with dreams of building his own hotel.

Continue reading: Three To Tango Review

Oliver Platt

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Oliver Platt

Date of birth

12th January, 1960

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.92




Oliver Platt Movies

Professor Marston and the Wonder Women Movie Review

Professor Marston and the Wonder Women Movie Review

The rather astonishing true story of the creation of the Wonder Woman character, this is...

Shut In Trailer

Shut In Trailer

Mary Portman is suffering greatly with the grief of the death of her husband Richard,...

Rules Don't Apply Trailer

Rules Don't Apply Trailer

Warren Beatty writes, directs and stars in the new movie Rules Don't Apply. Marla Mabrey...

The 9th Life of Louis Drax Movie Review

The 9th Life of Louis Drax Movie Review

With heavy overtones of Hitchcockian mystery and intrigue, this stylish thriller is the enjoyably melodramatic...

The 9th Life of Louis Drax Trailer

The 9th Life of Louis Drax Trailer

Louis Drax is a young boy who lives with his mother and father, the family...

The Tale of The Princess Kaguya Trailer

The Tale of The Princess Kaguya Trailer

Once upon a time in Japan, a bamboo cutter discovered a miniature girl inside the...

Cut Bank Trailer

Cut Bank Trailer

Dwayne McLaren is an ambitious high school graduate, whose success on the football field led...

Mortdecai Trailer

Mortdecai Trailer

When a priceless painting is stolen with the presumable intention of being sold to fund...

Kill The Messenger Trailer

Kill The Messenger Trailer

Kill the Messenger follows the real life story of Journalist Gary Webb (Jeremy Renner), as...

Mortdecai Trailer

Mortdecai Trailer

Charlie Mortdecai may be rude, arrogant and distinctly unlikeable, but he's also a terribly rich...

Chef Movie Review

Chef Movie Review

Like comfort food, this movie has very little nutritional value, but it sure goes down...

Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return Movie Review

Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return Movie Review

Despite substandard animation, this brightly coloured sequel has a strong enough sense of both its...

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