Nora Zehetner

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Nora Zehetner - A host of stars were photographed as they arrived to the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival for the Chanel Artists Dinner in Manhattan, New York, United States - Monday 20th April 2015

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Nora Zehetner
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Nora Zehetner

Nora Zehetner - Maron sitcom actress Nora Zehetner goes shopping at The Grove in Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 11th February 2015

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Nora Zehetner
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Nora Zehetner
Nora Zehetner

Izabella Miko, Natasha Ren, Leah Pipes, Addison Timlin and Nora Zehetner - Photographs from the audience and atmosphere at the Gavlak Hollywood gallery opening fashion show held at the Gavlak Gallery in Hollywood, California, United States - Monday 27th October 2014

Izabella Miko, Natasha Ren, Leah Pipes, Addison Timlin and Nora Zehetner
Natasha Ren and Izabella Miko
Natasha Ren and Izabella Miko
Natasha Ren and Izabella Miko
Natasha Ren and Izabella Miko
Natasha Ren and Izabella Miko

Nora Zehetner - Special screening of 'Obvious Child' held at ArcLight Cinemas Hollywood - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 5th June 2014

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Nora Zehetner

Nora Zehetner - 4th Annual amfAR Inspiration Gala New York at The Plaza Hotel - New York, NY, United States - Thursday 13th June 2013

Nora Zehetner

Video - Patrick Stewart, Jennifer Carpenter And Maggie Grace Arrive At NY 'Killing Them Softly' Premiere - Part 2


The New York 'Killing Them Softly' premiere was Hollywood star central with numerous movie stars taking to the red carpet including 'Star Trek' star Patrick Stewart with his partner Sunny Ozell, 'Dexter' star Jennifer Carpenter, Maggie Grace from 'Taken', 'The Curious Case of Benjamin Button' actress Taraji P. Henson and one of the premiering movie's stars Scoot McNairy.

Continue: Video - Patrick Stewart, Jennifer Carpenter And Maggie Grace Arrive At NY 'Killing Them Softly' Premiere - Part 2

Fifty Pills Review


Good
If the movies are any judge, I did not have nearly as much fun in college as I was supposed to. In Fifty Pills, young Darren (Lou Taylor Pucci, a kind of cross between Colin Hanks and DJ Qualls) finds himself on probation on the second day of school! By Christmas he's lost his scholarship, all because he and his jerk roommate Coleman (John Hensley) like to have a little party.

Dad's lost his job, too, and both his parents think he's gay (thanks to what turns out to be the movie's funniest single moment), so Darren scrambles back to the dorms to figure out how to raise another $1000 so he can stay in school. (Naturally, he's also in love with another resident named Gracie (Kristen Bell), but he can't profess him affections to her.)

Continue reading: Fifty Pills Review

Conversations With Other Women Review


Excellent
Try to watch director Hans Canosa's Conversations with Other Women twice and in quick succession. The memories that haunt the film's reunited lovers subtly inform every look, line, and gesture between them. For that reason, the film not only stands up to, it demands subsequent viewings if one wants to fully appreciate its layers of double meanings and shaded subtext.

What immediately sets Conversations apart is how, over its 85 minutes, it makes such fun and inventive use of the split-screen technique. The technique's most obvious function is to convey how the story's man and woman (Aaron Eckhart and Helena Bonham Carter), no matter their passion for each other, inhabit disparate and irreconcilable worlds. But it goes brilliantly beyond that, using split-screen also for flashbacks, triggered by memory, in which younger versions of the characters (Erik Eidem and Nora Zehetner), play out the halcyon days of their long-ago romance. What's more, the details of these flashbacks warp and alter, depending on who's doing the remembering. In an intriguing twist, the split-screen projects not only alternate versions of the past, but of the present too -- showing variations on small but important moments either as a character perceives they happened or he/she wishes they had. It's a sensationally expressive use of a tired cinematic device, now revitalized and itself revitalizing a tired genre.

Continue reading: Conversations With Other Women Review

Brick Review


Very Good
It doesn't take long to notice that Brick is a film that feels entirely fresh and new. It hits you rather suddenly, a few minutes after the movie begins: Why are teenagers talking like they came out of a Dashiell Hammett novel?

That's the rub, folks: Brick, as best as you can describe it, is a postmodern mashup of a '90s teen drug drama and a '30s noir. The setup is quite straightforward: A girl named Emily (Emilie de Ravin) is dead, and her ex-boyfriend Brendan (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, who apparently can't get enough of the indie scene now) wants to find out what happened. He suspects foul play, and he launches an investigation, much like some renegade gumshoe might do, always evading the watchful eye of the chief. Only here, there's no chief, just a principal (Richard Roundtree, of all people). With the help of a brilliant colleague -- er, classmate -- Brendan starts digging into the underworld, such as it exists in a world of letter jackets and parking lot brawls. (Indeed, for all the talk of highschool, not a single class is actually attended in Brick.)

Continue reading: Brick Review

Conversations With Other Women Review


Excellent
Try to watch director Hans Canosa's Conversations with Other Women twice and in quick succession. The memories that haunt the film's reunited lovers subtly inform every look, line, and gesture between them. For that reason, the film not only stands up to, it demands subsequent viewings if one wants to fully appreciate its layers of double meanings and shaded subtext. What immediately sets Conversations apart is how, over its 85 minutes, it makes such fun and inventive use of the split-screen technique. The technique's most obvious function is to convey how the story's man and woman (Aaron Eckhart and Helena Bonham Carter), no matter their passion for each other, inhabit disparate and irreconcilable worlds. But it goes brilliantly beyond that, using split-screen also for flashbacks, triggered by memory, in which younger versions of the characters (Erik Eidem and Nora Zehetner), play out the halcyon days of their long-ago romance. What's more, the details of these flashbacks warp and alter, depending on who's doing the remembering. In an intriguing twist, the split-screen projects not only alternate versions of the past, but of the present too -- showing variations on small but important moments either as a character perceives they happened or he/she wishes they had. It's a sensationally expressive use of a tired cinematic device, now revitalized and itself revitalizing a tired genre.Conversations opens as a wedding reception at a posh New York City hotel winds down. A man and woman -- each alone, bored, slightly drunk -- strike up a conversation. Their manner is flirtatious, but the back-and-forth is barbed with sarcastic half-truths, and, at least from the woman's side, with the thorns of years-old grievances. The woman, we learn, was one of the bridesmaids. She's traveled here from London where she has a well-to-do cardiologist husband and three children waiting for her. The man has a 22-year-old girlfriend back at home, but he isn't sweating it; we get the sense he's had many a 22-year-old girlfriend waiting on him at one time or another. Rather, he's more taken with the woman, who's clearly more than a passing fancy.The two don't have much time; the woman's flight leaves at dawn. They repair to her hotel room where their bittersweet, often humorous verbal dance continues with a break for the inevitable catch-up sex. On the page, this all sounds corny. But, as remembrances layer one upon the other, this relationship takes on the darkness and depth of an epic love. Screenwriter Gabrielle Zavin freshens up stale love story conventions, and does so the right way: By creating distinct, well rounded characters. We piece together, bit by bit, the circumstances of the woman fleeing their troubled affair for safe harbor in London, and what perhaps followed in the years following their breakup. At times, Zavin's scenes can feel stagy and amateurish, forcing her characters from one beat to another as each seeks to fill the decade-plus gap since they were last together.Luckily, she's got Canosa's playful direction and two exceedingly likeable performers in Eckhart and Bonham Carter to help smooth out the crimps in her script. Eckhart works away his characters' mischievous charm till, tentatively, the man's emotional wounds begin to bare and bleed. To my mind, this is also the worthiest part Bonham Carter's had since 1997's The Wings of the Dove, and here she reminds us what an engaging dramatic presence she can be, and that she holds her own with today's best screen actors.Like Richard Linklater's Before Sunset and André Téchiné's Changing Times, Conversations is actually interested in the joys and pains of human relationships. Each of these films is about sensitive, intelligent adults negotiating with that least selfish of human ideals: Eternal Love. In every significant way, these films are rare gems in an age of impersonal, cookie-cutter filmmaking, a soothing salve for blockbuster-bruised cinemagoers starved, like Conversations' own lovers, for something real and substantial.Why would you talk to another woman anyway?

Tart Review


Weak
Misleading title alert!

Not only does the provocative title of Tart mislead us, but the packaging features a lithe Dominique Swain on its covers, her schoolgirl skirt blowing up to expose her panties. The tagline: "Sex, Drugs and Study Hall."

Continue reading: Tart Review

R.S.V.P. Review


Very Good
If you're going to borrow wholesale from another movie, you could do worse that thieving from Alfred Hitchcock's Rope (itself borrowed from reality and the Leopold and Loeb murders).

R.S.V.P. takes the Rope recipe into the MTV zeroes, upping the body count considerably, transplanting the story to Las Vegas (in an apartment worthy of a Real World season), and packing in the sexy young stars (all up-and-comers and relative unknowns) to the point where they're spilling out the windows. Literally.

Continue reading: R.S.V.P. Review

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Nora Zehetner Movies

Conversations With Other Women Movie Review

Conversations With Other Women Movie Review

Try to watch director Hans Canosa's Conversations with Other Women twice and in quick succession....

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Conversations With Other Women Movie Review

Conversations With Other Women Movie Review

Try to watch director Hans Canosa's Conversations with Other Women twice and in quick succession....

R.S.V.P. Movie Review

R.S.V.P. Movie Review

If you're going to borrow wholesale from another movie, you could do worse that thieving...

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