Noah and the Whale's 'Heart of Nowhere' signifies ''the end of adolescence''.

The London band recently released their fourth album and frontman Charlie Fink believes the new record is a big ''transition'' for them which ''connects'' their previous three LPs, with a particular focus on growing up and leaving childhood behind.

He said: ''For me it's about looking back and drawing a line between who you were and where you are. We made three albums which were very different to each other; it was good to make something that finds the thread which binds the three records that made this band; that connects the dots of the things we've done before.

''A big part of the record it that transition from the desperate attempt to be free from your parents and to find yourself as your own person and then eventually reaching a more accepting feeling of 'This is who I am, I've inherited these genes' ... The album is the end of adolescence.''

Charlie - who is joined in the group by Tom Hobden, Matt Owens, Fred Abbott and Michael Petulla - was inspired by one particular track, which he believes encapsulates the overall feel of what they wanted their album to sound like.

He recalled to NME magazine: ''I wanted to start the record ... with a melodramatic story of breaking free. We were in a café in September and Baz Luhrmann's 'Everybody's Free (To Wear Sunscrean)' came on and I hadn't heard it in a decade.

''There was one like which stood out, something like 'Be careful whose advice you buy, but be patient with those who supply it/Advice is a form of nostalgia, dispensing it is a way of fishing the past'. It was a very sweet lyric and I connect with it.''