Nigel Hawthorne

Nigel Hawthorne

Nigel Hawthorne Quick Links

News Film RSS

The Black Cauldron Review


Good
Disney didn't make a PG-rated animated film until 1985; this is it, The Black Cauldron, Disney's 25th animated feature. The film successfully skews toward older kids, but it's not too much for the little ones. The story is one of the better ones from this era (predating Disney's 1990s renaissance), involving a boy who does battle with the Horned King as he attempts to destroy, well, a magic pot that would give the King the power to raise an army of the dead. That a kidnapped pig plays a central plot point is irrelevant, this is simple (and simply-animated) Disney fun. John Hurt's gravelly voice of the Horned King steals the show.

The Big Brass Ring Review


OK
Extremely convoluted and complex political thriller, made only because Orson Welles was in the process of making it (and starring from his own script) when he died in 1985. The political melodrama was intended as a "bookend" to Citizen Kane, but this ain't no Rosebud.

The Winslow Boy Review


Extraordinary
David Mamet scores again, and in the unlikeliest of films.

I've known and respected Mamet's directorial work since the gritty House of Games (1987) and have remained a fan through last year's The Spanish Prisoner. Without fail, Mamet works on gritty, hard-edged con-artistry-related flicks like these. So it's with no small amount of skepticism that I greeted the G-rated Winslow Boy.

Continue reading: The Winslow Boy Review

Tarzan (1999) Review


Good
Tarzan the Ape Man gets the Disney treatment this year. For some classic characters (Snow White, Bambi), the transition has been a positive one. For others (Pocahontas), it's been a disaster. Thankfully, Tarzan is among the former group.

The last time we saw Tarzan, he was saving a Lost City in the worst film of 1998 (shockingly titled Tarzan and the Lost City). The story is a bit more traditional this time, with Tarzan adopted by gorillas after his human parents are killed by a leopard. When he grows up, a group of British explorers stumble upon him, and after the "You Tarzan, me Jane" exchange, the British bad guy, Clayton, decides he's going to take all the gorillas back to Britain for sale. Adventure ensues, along with a love story and singing.

Continue reading: Tarzan (1999) Review

The Black Cauldron Review


Good
Disney didn't make a PG-rated animated film until 1985; this is it, The Black Cauldron, Disney's 25th animated feature. The film successfully skews toward older kids, but it's not too much for the little ones. The story is one of the better ones from this era (predating Disney's 1990s renaissance), involving a boy who does battle with the Horned King as he attempts to destroy, well, a magic pot that would give the King the power to raise an army of the dead. That a kidnapped pig plays a central plot point is irrelevant, this is simple (and simply-animated) Disney fun. John Hurt's gravelly voice of the Horned King steals the show.

Continue reading: The Black Cauldron Review

The Madness of King George Review


OK
1994's last Oscar contender crawled into Austin last week, the much-heralded film The Madness of King George. Adapted from the acclaimed stage play, Nigel Hawthorne reprises his lead role as King George III, the British monarch during the time of the American Revolution, who didn't quite have a full bag of marbles.

It all starts innocently enough, with a relatively sane King George administering government alongside the Queen (Helen Mirren). But soon George falls victim to an unpredictable nervous disorder, causing the King to completely lose his mind. For the next 20 minutes, people inexplicably chase the rambling King in his bedclothes, either in his castle or on the fields. I suppose there's a fine line between whether you can actually tackle a King or if he should be allowed to gallop around England unmolested, but I'm just a cold-hearted anti-Royalist American who wouldn't understand the intricacies of managing the throne.

Continue reading: The Madness of King George Review

Madeline Review


Grim
Fairly misguided and droll retelling of the original Madeline children's story. Not a lot in the way of positive role models or values... just some nutty, go-nowhere hijinks, much like Disney's live-action fare.

The Winslow Boy Review


Excellent

OK, let's just get this part out of the way right now:Who'd have imagined David Mamet -- that controversial master of brash,profanity-laced male head-butting -- could (or would even want to) directa G-rated masterpiece about the prim and proper society folk of EdwardianEngland?

Best known for his dialogue-driven, testosterone-saturatedstage plays ("Glengarry Glen Ross") and screenplays ("TheEdge"), Mamet seems the most unlikely directorfor a project such as "The Winslow Boy," a deceptively simpledrawing room drama about a family defending its sacred honor to the financial,emotional and medical detriment of its members.

The film is adapted from Terrence Rattigan's 1946 play-- loosely based on real events -- about the pursuit of justice for anupper-crust 13-year-old boy kicked out of a prestigious private schoolfor stealing a five schilling postal order.

Continue reading: The Winslow Boy Review

Nigel Hawthorne

Nigel Hawthorne Quick Links

News Film RSS