Nick Cassavetes

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Gena Rowlands honoured with a hand and footprint ceremony at the TCL Chinese Theatre

Zoe Cassavetes, Nick Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands - Gena Rowlands honoured with a hand and footprint ceremony at the TCL Chinese Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 5th December 2014

Nick Cassavetes
Nick Cassavetes
Nick Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands
Nick Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands
Nick Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands

Gena Rowlands honored with a hand and footprint ceremony

Gena Rowlands and Nick Cassavetes - Gena Rowlands to be honored at TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX with a hand and footprint ceremony at TCL CHINESE THEATRE IMAX - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 5th December 2014

Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands

Ryan Gosling & Rachel McAdams 'Screamed' At Each Other Whilst Filming 'The Notebook'


Ryan Gosling Rachel McAdams Nick Cassavetes

Everyone may rave about Ryan Gosling's chivalrous portrayal of Noah Calhoun in The Notebook but he was hardly as gallant off screen with his co-star Rachel McAdams. The Notebook's director, Nick Cassavetes, spoke to VH1 about how Gosling and McAdams got on whilst filming the 2004 romantic drama. Apparently it wasn't well!

Rachel McAdams
Rachel McAdams starred in The Notebook as Allie.

Gosling and McAdams dated for two years after they had met on the set of the Notebook but it wasn't always smooth sailing for the couple as Cassavetes described. Gosling reportedly demanded McAdams be removed with the set as he was struggling to work with her and even wanted a stand in actress to run lines with. Cassavetes tells of one incident in which the pair was not getting on well and Gosling asked him to remove McAdams from the set. He even requested another actress be brought in so he could practise his lines.

Continue reading: Ryan Gosling & Rachel McAdams 'Screamed' At Each Other Whilst Filming 'The Notebook'

What Chemistry? Ryan Gosling And Rachel McAdams Fought During ‘The Notebook’ Filming


Rachel McAdams Ryan Gosling Nick Cassavetes

The Notebook has just turned ten, bringing the classic romance movie back into the headlines with a deluge of new interviews and trivia regarding the film. Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams, who play the couple central to the movie adaptation's story, have long been considered as one of the most powerful onscreen couples.

Adapted from the novel of the same name by Nicholas Sparks, the story charts two lovers who fall in love during the early 1940s. Local country boy Noah Calhoun and heiress Allie Hamilton embark on a romance despite a myriad of issues, including the implications of their different classes and disapproval of Allie's parents.

The chemistry between the pair was so intense that the actors dated in real-life after wrapping filming. However, director Nick Cassavetes has now revealed that the two didn't exactly hit it off during filming. "Maybe I'm not supposed to tell this story, but they were really not getting along one day on set. Really not," he told VH-1.

Continue reading: What Chemistry? Ryan Gosling And Rachel McAdams Fought During ‘The Notebook’ Filming

Rachel McAdams' 'The Notebook' Audition Tape Will Give You Shivers


Rachel McAdams Ryan Gosling Nick Cassavetes

Once of the world's best-loved romance movies, The Notebook, has just turned ten, marking a decade since the then little-known actors Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams were catapulted into the spotlight with their breath-taking performance and onscreen chemistry.

Adapted from the novel of the same name by Nicholas Sparks, the story charts two lovers who fall in love during the early 1940s. Local country boy Noah Calhoun and heiress Allie Hamilton embark on a romance despite a myriad of issues, including the implications of their different classes and disapproval of Allie's parents.

Gosling's role as Noah was apparently secured fairly early on but director Nick Cassavetes had an extensive hunt for a leading lady to play Allie. In a newly-released audition tape, it's clear to see why Cassavetes and Gosling knew instantly that they wanted the Mean Girls actress for the movie.

Continue reading: Rachel McAdams' 'The Notebook' Audition Tape Will Give You Shivers

The Other Woman Trailer


One woman thinks she's on a roll with the first serious boyfriend she's had in months; he's handsome, successful, rich. as well as a total liar. When he ventures off to his home in Connecticut to investigate a 'burst pipe', the woman goes round later to surprise him - only to find that the house is also occupied by his wife. In a bid to talk things over, the wife visits Woman A at her apartment and, before you know it, the girls are at a bar downing shots and generally being best pals. However, things get even more complicated when they discover their man is also seeing yet another woman - a gorgeous busty blonde - and the three cheated women decide to plot revenge. With the wife slipping female hormones into his morning beverages and all three women discovering his fraudulent business secrets, this man is about to realise that having mistresses is a very bad idea.

'The Other Woman' is a new comedy from director Nick Cassavetes ('The Notebook', 'Alpha Dog', 'My Sister's Keeper') which has been written by Melissa Stack ('Tependris Rising') in her full-length film debut. It is the live action film debut of Nicki Minaj (who previously voiced Steffie in 'Ice Age: Continental Drift') and it is set to hit the UK on April 23rd 2014.

Click here to read The Other Woman movie review

Picture - Nick Cassavetes Los Angeles, California, Sunday 27th November 2005

Nick Cassavetes Sunday 27th November 2005 LACMA's Art And Film Gala Honoring Clint Eastwood And John Baldessari at LACMA Los Angeles, California

Nick Cassavetes

The Hangover Part II Review


Grim
Proving that 2009's The Hangover was a fluke, this sequel returns to filmmaker Todd Phillips' more usual mean-spirited style, abandoning laughs for a series of painfully awkward scenarios held together by a contrived plot.

Having finally put the embarrassment of "that" weekend in Las Vegas behind him, Stu (Helms) is ready to settle down with fiance Lauren (Chung), who's planning their romantic wedding in Thailand. But after a night drinking on the beach, Stu wakes up in a Bangkok flat with fast-thinking friend Phil (Cooper), nutcase Alan (Galifianakis), an eerily smart monkey and Mr Chow (Jeong), the criminal who caused such chaos in Vegas. The problem is that Lauren's 16-year-old brother Teddy (Mason Lee) is missing. But what exactly happened last night?

Continue reading: The Hangover Part II Review

Picture - Nick Cassavetes New York City, USA, Wednesday 24th June 2009

Nick Cassavetes Wednesday 24th June 2009 The World premiere of 'My Sister's Keeper' held at the AMC Loews Lincoln Square - Arrivals New York City, USA

Nick Cassavetes

Picture - Cameron Diaz and Nick Cassavetes Los Angeles, California, Monday 22nd June 2009

Cameron Diaz, Nick Cassavetes, Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame and Walk Of Fame - Cameron Diaz and Nick Cassavetes Los Angeles, California - Cameron Diaz is honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame Monday 22nd June 2009

Cameron Diaz, Nick Cassavetes, Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame and Walk Of Fame

Face/off Review


Excellent
It's hard to remember the whooshing sighs of disappointment from his fans that greeted John Woo in 1996 when, after so many half-steps and mis-starts, he made his big Hollywood debut with the stolen-nuke thriller Broken Arrow. Having left the Hong Kong business on a high with 1992's psychotic near-parody Hard Boiled, Woo did a Jean-Claude Van Damme flick -- 1993's Hard Target, which was heavily botched by studio interference but still contained some brilliant work -- before deciding to go seriously Hollywood. For Broken Arrow, he toned down his trademark mix of ultra-violent flourishes and teary-eyed humanism to concentrate on doing a by-the-book mid-'90s action flick that was generic in the extreme but raked in the money. The next year, though, Woo proved it had all just been an extraordinarily canny maneuver to allow him to make Face/Off, possibly the greatest, and definitely the most exuberant, action film to come out of the studio system in that decade.

A schizoid doppelganger mind-bender wrapped around your standard ticking-bomb scenario (it's hidden somewhere in Los Angeles and could take out the whole basin if detonated -- or something), Face/Off is an utterly lunatic film in the best possible way. Originally a futuristic thriller, the script was retooled for a modern-day setting, keeping several of its sci-fi elements but focusing more intently on its personality-shifting aspects which seemed to come straight out of Woo's international breakthrough, The Killer. An FBI agent, Sean Archer (John Travolta) has been hunting jet-set super-criminal Castor Troy (Nicolas Cage) for years. For Archer, it's gone beyond personal to haunted obsession, particularly after Troy tried to shoot Archer but missed and killed his son instead. After a gonzo opening sequence involving a Humvee/private jet showdown on a runway and about ten thousand expended rounds (mostly fired by people flying sideways in slo-mo, of course), Archer's team brings down Troy.

Continue reading: Face/off Review

Alpha Dog Review


Grim
Nick Cassavetes' Alpha Dog is an infuriating misfire that would have been much more easily overlooked had it managed to stay true to one vision or the other; instead, Cassavetes (who also wrote the screenplay) keeps one foot in the teen-exploitation camp and another in the hardboiled true crime camp, never quite making up his mind which way to go. For every moment that plays real there are at least two that absolutely do not, producing a wildly schizophrenic film that has many chances at greatness and misses nearly all of them.

The pugilistic script is based on one of those fascinatingly ugly crime stories that come rocketing out of Southern California every now and again, to much clucking of tongues over wayward and rudderless youth. Following the sad state of events that leads a drug dealer to kidnap the younger brother of a client who owes him money, as a means of extracting said payment, the film traces how the kidnapped teenager (a momma's boy who yearns for rebellion) develops a horribly overwrought case of Stockholm Syndrome, earnestly believing he's just having a good time with the dealer's hard-partying friends. In fact, while the kids party like it's 1999 (the year the kidnapping actually took place), imbibing copious amounts of drugs and alcohol, the dealer, Johnny (Emile Hirsch, like an evil version of Turtle from Entourage) is panicking, having realized what he's gotten himself into.

Continue reading: Alpha Dog Review

Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle Review


Good
Alan Rudolph's loving portrayal of Dorothy Parker (a spot-on yet frequently incomprehensible Jennifer Jason Leigh) is a film for historians and literary fans alike, with a cast featuring more art-house favorites than any other movie in recent memory (just look at the cast list!). The film drips into treacle with its treatment of the love triangle among Parker, her husband (Matthew Broderick), and Robert Benchley (Campbell Scott). It's the primary focus of the movie but also its weakest link. The film is at its heights when the ensemble is in full force as Parker plies her wit around the Algonquin Round Table and various social affairs (all during the age of Prohibition). Leigh was snubbed on an Oscar nomination here despite a strong performance in a very weak year (Jessica Lange won for the tepid Blue Sky).

Life Review


Weak
Rather lukewarm for balls-out Eddie Murphy/Martin Lawrence comedy, Life tells the story of two 1930s black men wrongly sentenced to life in prison for murder. That's just brimming with comedy potential, no? Well, Life isn't so sweet, as Murphy and Lawrence spend much of the movie trading insults and slapfighting like children. It isn't until they become old men and we reach present day that the characters are very likable. In other words: This is not Shawshank.

The Independent Review


Good
Mockumentary about the movie business? Okay, not original in any sense of the word, but putting Janeane Garofalo in a suit and spray-on tan is simply inspired.

The Independent is Jerry Stiller's show, starring him as Morty Fineman, a Roger Corman/Andy Sidaris-style filmmaker who makes lovingly crafted low-budget, borderline-exploitation films that the world largely dismisses as junk. The film follows Morty and daughter Paloma (Garofalo) as they try to revive Morty's sagging career and reflect on decades of schlocky work like Brothers Divided (about Siamese twins in Vietnam) and Foxy Chocolate Robot (about a foxy chocolate robot). The film uses present-day footage intercut with scenes ostensibly from Morty's body of work, all appropriate in graininess, streaks, and rotten acting quality. Real-world directors like Roger Corman and Ron Howard appear to offer commentary on Morty's oeuvre, all of whom declare him an underrated genius.

Continue reading: The Independent Review

Nick Cassavetes

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