Wilson Wants The Supremes To Reunite

Former SUPREMES star MARY WILSON is hoping the Motown legends can reform in the near future - and she believes the reunited three-piece would be hugely successful. The group last performed together at the Pasadena Civic Center in Southern California in 1983, 13 years after DIANA ROSS' departure, but Wilson believes fans are desperate for a 2007 comeback. She says, "People really want that to happen. "It almost happened two or three years ago, but they wouldn't pay me (enough)." But she added the reunion would only get the go-ahead if Ross agrees to take part.


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Tags: Mary Wilson - Diana Ross


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Comments

Garrett100's picture

Garrett100

Mary Wilson is the patron saint of mediocrities: people who have accomplished nothing find their reflection in her. She suffers from arrested development, and cannot get over her youthful years. The Supremes was where Diana Ross served her apprenticeship, before going on to a solo career of more than three distinguished decades.
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Garrett100's picture

Garrett100

How can Mary Wilson spend decades performing character assasination on Diana Ross and still expect a Supremes reunion? Mary Wilson is a no-talent idiot; and her only claim to fame is her exploitation (and denigration) of Diana Ross's name, and Wilson's long-ago participation in the Supremes (in which Wilson did nothing but inadequately support superior singers).-------Diana Ross, Dreamgirls, and BeyonceIt would be great if more people realized that the musical Dreamgirls uses the image and myth of the Supremes more than the facts: both Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson are (were) mediocre talents. Ballard had a large, rough voice and could not be compared to Aretha Franklin, Etta James, or even Jennifer Holliday; and Mary Wilson's voice is even worse (Wilson has achieved absolutely nothing on her own in thirty years and were it not for Wilson's continual exploitation of Diana Ross's name and Wilson's presentation of herself as a victim she would get no public attention at all). It is Diana Ross's unique voice that sold the Supremes music and lasted for a solo career; and with Dreamgirls we have another attempt to re-write history. The film is escapism, not biography, not history, not sociology. The critical genuflection before this film suggests that many critics and much of the audience do not know about much except entertainment-and not enough of entertainment history or social history. The musical advances simplistic notions of identity: that there is only one way to be African-American (raw and rude), as if sophistication and success are ethnic betrayals. Modern black pop, such as that made by Diana Ross, Stevie Wonder, Smokey Robinson, and Marvin Gaye, is music of individuality and invention, music of charm and personality: people around the world have the best reasons for responding to that music. I have never met and do not know Diana Ross: I only know her work, soulful songs such as "Ain't No Mountain High Enough," "Touch Me in the Morning," "Love Hangover," "Mirror, Mirror," "Missing You," and great albums like "The Boss" and "Take Me Higher." More recently, Ross's warmly received performances in Europe and Australia and musical album releases such as "I Love You," "The Definitive Diana Ross," and "Blue" have only added to her legacy. She is part of more than one tradition: not only that of the girl groups but that of the supper club and concert hall, like Lena Horne and Nat King Cole, and that of international pop featuring a performer such as Sam Cooke, that of rock (Chuck Berry, Little Richard), and also the popular ballad (Streisand, Nancy Wilson): Diana Ross is a complex figure, not a simple figure-and watching her career, I have learned that delicacy is not weakness, ambition is not ruthlessness, intelligence is not lack of feeling, and one does not have to be just one thing. Diana Ross, as woman and a performer, is worthy of affection and respect, and her genuine and ongoing contribution should not be misrepresented or forgotten. Modern black (African-American) popular music, all of it, is diverse: and rests on imagination, talent, and taste--not narrow definitions of ethnicity or musical form. On Beyonce's B'Day, via CompulsiveReader.com:http://www.compulsivereader.com/html/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=1456 On Diana Ross:http://www.compulsivereader.com/html/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=1374
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England's No1's picture

England's No1

Garrett,Your comments don't deserse a reply. Just in case you were not around in the 60s (I am guessing you were not) The world fell in love with THREE ladies - real fans will tell you that it was/is common knowledge that there were three talented singers in the group. Miss Wilson still performs around the world - in such a cut-throat business NO-ONE would survive nearly 50 years without being talented. I love both Mary and Diana - they and Flo (and Cindy) were part of my growing-up. In case you have forgotten "The Supremes" of 2000 went out without Miss Wilson - and the TRUE fans would not accept it. Even Miss Ross could not sell tickets for that line-up.
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