The stars of Admission -- Tina Fey, Paul Rudd, Lily Tomlin, Wallace Shawn -- hav all appeared in better funnier movies, the critics agree, making this one seem pretty lame by comparison. Several critics, in fact, don't know quite how to describe it. Mick LaSalle in the San Francisco Chronicle settles on a drama with wisecracks, then adds that it might be called a comedy-drama, but not by virtue of its capturing a wide swath of human experience, but rather by its being effectively neither comic nor dramatic.... It feels, looks and radiates drabness. Ty Burr in the Boston Globe has the same problem. Admissions has to be either a delirious farce or a complete train wreck, he comments. Surprisingly, it's neither, but neither is it a great movie. Fairly good will have to do. Lou Lumenick in the New York Post castigates the filmmakers who conceived the film but nevertheless concludes that it still has considerable entertainment value as a flawed vehicle for Fey. Joe Neumaier in the New York Daily News remarks that while the film checks all the boxes for being a phoned-in, phony, padded rom-com, the stars themselves will likely be able to expunge this black mark from their permanent record. It's not really that bad, Claudia Puig in USA Today concludes. It's just genial, predictable and ultimately forgettable.