Neil Simon

Neil Simon

Neil Simon Quick Links

News Pictures Film Footage Quotes RSS

Eileen Brennan

Stockard Cahnning, Louise Fletcher, Madeline Kahn, Neil Simon, Eileen Brennan, Ann-Margaret, Marsha Mason and Peter Falk - The Cheap Detective (1978) directed by Robert Moore shown clockwise from lower left: Stockard Cahnning, Louise Fletcher, Madeline Kahn, Neil Simon, Eileen Brennan, Ann-Margaret, Marsha Mason center: Peter Falk - United States - Wednesday 26th July 1978

Opening night of THE BIG KNIFE

Elaine Joyce and Neil Simon - Opening night of THE BIG KNIFE at the American Airlines Theatre - Arrivals - New York, NY, United States - Tuesday 16th April 2013

The Big Knife

Elaine Joyce and Neil Simon - Opening night of 'The Big Knife' at the American Airlines Theatre-Arrivals. - New York City, New York , United States - Tuesday 16th April 2013

Elaine Joyce and Neil Simon
Elaine Joyce and Neil Simon

Picture - Neil Simon , Sunday 13th January 2013

Neil Simon Opening night of 'Picnic' at the American Airlines Theatre - Arrivals Featuring: Neil Simon Where: New York City, NY, United States When: 13 Jan 2013

Neil Simon
Neil Simon

Video - Alex And Nat Wolff, Marc Cohn And Cheyenne Jackson At Les Miserables NY Premiere


Arrivals at the New York premiere for Les Miserables included 'The Naked Brothers Band' stars Alex Wolff and Nat Wolff, Grammy winning musician Marc Cohn and his wife Elizabeth Vargas and '30 Rock' actor Cheyenne Jackson. When Alex and Nat pose on the red carpet, one photographer can be heard referring to Alex as 'four eyes' while another paparazzo retorts 'don't f***ing insult them!'.

Continue: Video - Alex And Nat Wolff, Marc Cohn And Cheyenne Jackson At Les Miserables NY Premiere

The Odd Couple Review


Excellent
There was a time, a little less than four decades ago, when Neil Simon was the literary benchmark of both Broadway and the Silver Screen. After a successful stint as a TV scribe on Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows, the soon to be phenomenon went on to create such Great White Way staples as Barefoot in the Park, Sweet Charity, Plaza Suite, and The Prisoner of Second Avenue. In 1966, he had four shows running at once and it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling.

After adapting his Come Blow Your Horn and Park for the big screen, Simon was given the complicated task of translating his mega-hit The Odd Couple as a movie. While the studios would accept Oscar- and Tony-winner Walter Matthau as Oscar, Art Carney's cinematic clout as Felix was questioned. Luckily, director Gene Saks hired friend and Fortune Cookie co-star Jack Lemmon as the notorious neat freak. The rest, as they say, is motion picture history.

Continue reading: The Odd Couple Review

The Heartbreak Kid (1972) Review


Good
Long before Meet the Parents, there was The Heartbreak Kid. Genuinely funny, Kid features Charles Grodin as a hapless and sappy ex-G.I. who decides to dump his new wife -- on his honeymoon in Florida -- after falling for a young blonde played with perfect coyness by Shepherd. Genuinely funny thanks to Grodin's prodigious comic talents, though Eddie Albert nearly steals the show as Shephard's heard-it-all father. Now about that ending (or lack of one)...

The Lonely Guy Review


Excellent
Before Arthur Hiller lost his mind and his talent, he produced this oddball Steve Martin flick, wherein an oblivious cuckold of a boyfriend is dumped by his girlfriend and quickly becomes a "lonely guy," '80s parlance for a loser bachelor. With pal Charles Grodin (wonderful here), he explores the bar scene, pick-up artistry, and the world of the house plant before writing a bestseller about his experiences and making it big. Funny stuff, though Martin's soliloquies to the camera get a little tiresome.

Chapter Two Review


OK
Possibly Neil Simon's most morbid play, James Caan plays a widower who finds love a second time in catty Marsha Mason. Their whirlwind romance comprises the over-long but occasionally funny tragicomedy, one of Simon's lesser-known works but certainly one of the films that's closest to his heart.

The Heartbreak Kid Review


Good
Long before Meet the Parents, there was The Heartbreak Kid. Genuinely funny, Kid features Charles Grodin as a hapless and sappy ex-G.I. who decides to dump his new wife -- on his honeymoon in Florida -- after falling for a young blonde played with perfect coyness by Shepherd. Genuinely funny thanks to Grodin's prodigious comic talents, though Eddie Albert nearly steals the show as Shephard's heard-it-all father. Now about that ending (or lack of one)...

Plaza Suite Review


Weak
The Odd Couple excepted, this is the best way to take Neil Simon material: In short, manageable chunks. Plaza Suite was the first of Simon's "Suite" series (follwed by California and London), telling three short stories each of which takes place in the Plaza Hotel in New York City.

Oh, and all of them star Walter Matthau, in three different roles, with three different leading ladies.

Continue reading: Plaza Suite Review

The Sunshine Boys Review


OK
A highly regarded yet infinitely rambling Neil Simon comedy, The Sunshine Boys is notable mainly because of the Oscar-winning appearance of an 80-year-old George Burns, who returned to the screen after more than 30 years in retirement. The movie itself is a bit lackluster (clever dialogue, but it really goes on and on and on...), with two aging ex-Vaudevillians (Burns and Walter Matthau) in a duel of tongues after Matthau's nephew/agent has hauled them out of retirement to make a quick buck. Life imitates art, no? Burns would become a bigger star than ever in later years, as the Oh God series made him, well, a diety.

Continue reading: The Sunshine Boys Review

California Suite Review


Good
This Neil Simon tragicomedy features four groups of people who converge on a L.A. hotel on the eve of the Oscars. Three stories are pretty funny -- especially Walter Matthau's unfaithful husband to Elaine May, but it's the Fonda-Alda weep-fest that opens the movie that almost ruins the show completely. Still, it's salvagable, something of a Four Rooms... still not done quite right.
Neil Simon

Neil Simon Quick Links

News Pictures Film Footage Quotes RSS