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Liam Neeson Shares Natasha Richardson's Final Phone Call In Heart-Breaking '60 Minutes' Interview [Video]


Liam Neeson Natasha Richardson

Liam Neeson has broken his silence five year after the tragic death of his wife Natasha Richardson in an emotionally raw interview on 60 Minutes with Anderson Cooper. Richardson, the English actress, died on the 18th March 2009 after she hit her head in a skiing accident in Quebec. The Taken star was the one who made the agonising decision to turn off her life support as she lay brain dead.

Liam Neeson Battleship Premiere
Liam Neeson Has Spoken About The Death Of His Wife, Natasha Richardson.

In the interview, Neeson guides Anderson around his upstate New York home and talks about the intense grief he has suffered in the aftermath of his loss. The 61 year-old film star also shared what must be one of his most painful memories, Natasha's final phone call to him after she'd had her accident. "I spoke to her and she said, 'Oh, darling. I've taken a tumble in the snow.' That's how she described it," Liam said.

Continue reading: Liam Neeson Shares Natasha Richardson's Final Phone Call In Heart-Breaking '60 Minutes' Interview [Video]

Natasha Richardson - Pre-BAFTA Dinner at Annabels London United Kingdom Saturday 9th February 2013

Fisher Stevens and Natasha Richardson - Fisher Stevens and Aidan Quinn New York City, USA - Celebrities attend the wake of Natasha Richardson at the American Irish Historical Society Friday 20th March 2009

Natasha Richardson Thursday 12th February 2009 amfAR New York Gala to Kick Off Fall 2009 Fashion Week at Cipriani on 42nd Street New York City, USA

Natasha Richardson
Natasha Richardson
Kenneth Cole and Natasha Richardson
Natasha Richardson

Natasha Richardson and Billy Elliot - Natasha Richardson and her sons, Michael Richard Antonio Neeson and Daniel Jack Neeson Thursday 13th November 2008 at Imperial Theatre New York City, USA

Natasha Richardson and Billy Elliot
Natasha Richardson and Billy Elliot
Natasha Richardson and Billy Elliot
Natasha Richardson and Billy Elliot
Natasha Richardson and Billy Elliot

Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson - Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson London, England - The Times BFI London Film Festival - 'The Other Man' - Arrivals Friday 17th October 2008

Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson
Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson
Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson
Liam Neeson
Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson
Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson

The White Countess Review


Very Good
Audiences can expect one thing from the filmmaking team of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory: a Merchant Ivory film isn't meant to be watched, like other movies; it's meant to be visited, like a museum. While the results are sometimes dazzling and rich, and at others times stuffy and inert, the Merchant Ivory approach is nonetheless consistent. Each of their scripts lies somewhere between screenplay and novel. The attention they pay to period detail is lavish. And a Merchant Ivory cast typically reads like a roster of the world's leading thespians. Their most recent effort, The White Countess, is no different.

In it, all the Merchant Ivory hallmarks are present. The stalwart cast is led by Ralph Fiennes and a trio of Redgraves: Vanessa Redgrave, Lynn Redgrave, and Natasha Richardson, Vanessa Redgrave's daughter. The setting -- Shanghai in the period leading up to the Sino-Japanese War of 1937-1945 -- is lush and meticulously rendered. And the script, loosely adapted from Junichiro Tanizaki's novel The Diary of a Mad Old Man, was penned by acclaimed writer Kazuo Ishiguro.

Continue reading: The White Countess Review

The Comfort Of Strangers Review


Very Good
There's something about Venice that invites freaky behavior I suppose. Maybe it's the proximity to the water. Like New Orleans. Barbet Schroeder's The Comfort of Strangers makes excellent use of Venice's unique atmosphere and throws a little Walken into the mix. The story follows a young couple on holiday there. They get lost, encounter a wealthy man about town (Walken), and end up palling around with him a bit. He's alternately nice (letting them stay in his house) and cruel (punching poor Rupert Everett in the stomach), and ultimately things turn tragic. I won't pretend that the film makes a lick of sense, but it sure is fun to watch.

The White Countess Review


Very Good
Audiences can expect one thing from the filmmaking team of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory: a Merchant Ivory film isn't meant to be watched, like other movies; it's meant to be visited, like a museum. While the results are sometimes dazzling and rich, and at others times stuffy and inert, the Merchant Ivory approach is nonetheless consistent. Each of their scripts lies somewhere between screenplay and novel. The attention they pay to period detail is lavish. And a Merchant Ivory cast typically reads like a roster of the world's leading thespians. Their most recent effort, The White Countess, is no different.

In it, all the Merchant Ivory hallmarks are present. The stalwart cast is led by Ralph Fiennes and a trio of Redgraves: Vanessa Redgrave, Lynn Redgrave, and Natasha Richardson, Vanessa Redgrave's daughter. The setting -- Shanghai in the period leading up to the Sino-Japanese War of 1937-1945 -- is lush and meticulously rendered. And the script, loosely adapted from Junichiro Tanizaki's novel The Diary of a Mad Old Man, was penned by acclaimed writer Kazuo Ishiguro.

Continue reading: The White Countess Review

Asylum Review


Good
As cool and chiseled as star Natasha Richardson's face, Asylum (based on a novel by Patrick McGrath) is set for the most part at a high-security insane asylum in northern England in 1959. Richardson plays Stella Raphael, whose husband Max (Hugh Bonneville) has been made deputy superintendent at the hospital, meaning a long spell among the mad and their repressed warders for Stella and their son Charlie (Gus Lewis). At the best of times, Stella seems like she'd have difficulty fitting in, but with her aloof and depressed air, cigarette held high in one hand, martini in the other, she seems downright ogre-ish to the provincial locals. Stella smokes at her kitchen table, asking the maid, "How did my predecessor fill her time?" Consumed with work, Max is hardly any help, and even Charlie doesn't seem able to keep Stella's attention.

At least there's a handsome mental patient who's allowed to work in the grounds near the Raphael's house, giving Stella reason to get up in the morning. For those not as terminally depressed as Stella, it would seem a negative that Edgar Stark (Marton Csokas) had been put in the asylum for butchering his wife; but hey, a girl's got to keep busy. Director David Mackenzie (Young Adam) and screenwriter Patrick Marber (Closer) don't waste much of the audience's time before bringing Edgar and Stella together in a brutal coupling in a half-ruined greenhouse that shows, in one simple and uninterrupted shot, more heated passion than a half-dozen other films' frantic editing and sensuous lighting could manage. The heated connection between the two is so believable that all the events which follow from their affair - including, but not limited to, Edgar's escape - and the depths of darkness into which nearly all the characters are plunged, seem nothing less than utterly inevitable.

Continue reading: Asylum Review

The Handmaid's Tale Review


Very Good
Margaret Atwood's highly regarded novel came to the screen in 1990 in an uneven yet still gripping production (newly released on DVD). Natasha Richardson makes perhaps the biggest impact in her career as Offred, the "handmaid" at the center of a dystopic future where ultra-right wing factions are in control of the government, martial law rules, and biological agents have rendered 99% of women sterile. Those women who are still fertile and have been convicted of some crime, however ridiculous, become handmaids, stripped from their lives and sentenced to service the remaining rich and powerful, whose wives can't conceive children.

Offred finds herself at the mercy of a good-natured but subtly manipulative commander (Robert Duvall) and his faded-star wife Serena Joy (Faye Dunaway). And soon enough she slips her way into an underground aiming to overthrow the fascist regime.

Continue reading: The Handmaid's Tale Review

Blow Dry Review


Weak
Hmmm, what's this movie with Josh Hartnett and Rachael Leigh Cook on the cover? Must be some nutty teen comedy, right?

Well, with one cancer diagnosis and one death in the first 15 minutes, Blow Dry is hardly the feel-good romance you'd expect. Strikingly similar to The Big Tease, Blow Dry tells the story of a haircutting competition that descends on a small town in Britain. Celebrities (well, celebrity stylists) from around England arrive to compete, and the local boys get into the act as well. But while the drama unfolds with models and shears, another drama takes place among the locals -- largely involving various romances and a singular cancer victim.

Continue reading: Blow Dry Review

Chelsea Walls Review


Good
New York living is all about location. And where you live is often a sign of your lifestyle. If you live in Brooklyn, it is assumed you are more artistically inclined then, say, someone living in Queens (though this borough is making a comeback with its cheap rent). But the most notorious creative residence in all of New York has been the Chelsea Hotel, as far back as anyone can remember. Boasting such notable alumni as Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, and Bob Dylan, there is still a laidback, comfortably scrappy atmosphere about the place when you walk by.

Ethan Hawke (Training Day) courageously attempts to capture the essence of what makes this landmark so addictive in his directorial debut, Chelsea Walls. A collage of character plotlines that only barely intersect, Chelsea is a unique and respectable experiment in its focus on an inanimate object as its central character. Backed by a score that appropriately feels as if it were written while observing the production, Hawke creates an environment easily accessible to both New Yorkers and the non-initiated.

Continue reading: Chelsea Walls Review

Maid In Manhattan Review


OK

After exuding clever charm and dodging most of the cheap Cinderella contrivances that linger around every corner of its plot, the ostensibly crisp romantic comedy "Maid in Manhattan" turns so unforgivably trite in its last 10 minutes that any moviegoer without a fortified sweet tooth will likely be sent into sugar shock.

Provided with more depth than most genre heroines, star Jennifer Lopez shines brightly as Marisa Ventura, a single mom from the Bronx who works as a maid at one of New York's most posh hotels. Mistaken for a ritzy guest while trying on a $5,000 Dolce & Gabbana suit in someone's luggage, she catches the eye of Christopher Marshall (Ralph Fiennes), the flirtatious and good-looking heir to a political dynasty, and quickly becomes the object of his affection -- and of much speculation in the New York tabloids during Marshall's run for congress.

Trapped into maintaining the illusion for the time being, Marisa ends up risking her shot for a management position as real life starts catching up with her. But in the hands of discriminating director Wayne Wang (who brings emotional authenticity to both independent films like "Center of the World," and studio pictures like "Anywhere But Here"), this fairy tale is refreshingly substantial fare with quality, character-building and considerably less predictability than recent dumbed-down hits like "Sweet Home Alabama." Or so it seems for a while.

Continue reading: Maid In Manhattan Review

Blow Dry Review


Weak

"Blow Dry" is a leaden British dramedy about an estranged family of hairdressers reconciling when a big coiffeur competition comes to their small town. Like "The Big Tease" -- a similarly themed English mockumentary that came out last year, delaying the release of this one -- its laughs come mostly from tired flamboyancy stereotypes.

Hairdressers with over-styled, out-of-date dos and David Copperfield-like showmanship bite each other's backs to win what is apparently a prestigious award for clever and speedy hair cutting. Meanwhile a sad-sack local barber (Alan Rickman) enters the competition with his son (Josh Hartnett, "The Virgin Suicides") to face down his former salon partner (Bill Nighy), now the nation's star hairdresser and the dirty-tricking front-runner in the contest.

Besides suffering from the same problems "The Big Tease" had -- basically that it's a cliché-riddled underdog sports movie with a dye job and a limp wrist -- "Blow Dry" is also saddled with a maudlin, comedy-antidote subplot about Rickman's estranged lesbian ex-wife (Natasha Richardson), who is bravely dying of cancer 10 years after leaving him for his hair model (a criminally under-used Rachel Griffiths). Brought together again by the competition, everybody gets busy forgiving.

Continue reading: Blow Dry Review

Natasha Richardson

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Natasha Richardson Movies

Wild Child Trailer

Wild Child Trailer

Wild Child Trailer Poppy is a 16 year old girl -played by Emma Roberts (Nancy...

Evening, Trailer Stream Trailer

Evening, Trailer Stream Trailer

Evening Trailer A truly extraordinary cast breathes glorious life into Susan Minot and Pulitzer Prize...

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The White Countess Trailer

The White Countess Trailer

Shanghai, 1936 was a crossroads for political intrigue, refugees escaping turmoil, gathering military forces, international...

Asylum Movie Review

Asylum Movie Review

As cool and chiseled as star Natasha Richardson's face, Asylum (based on a novel by...

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Maid in Manhattan Movie Review

Maid in Manhattan Movie Review

It wouldn't be the holiday season without fairy tales starring the likes of Santa, Rudolph,...

Waking Up in Reno Movie Review

Waking Up in Reno Movie Review

There are bad movies, and there are awful movies. And then there is Waking Up...

Blow Dry Movie Review

Blow Dry Movie Review

Hmmm, what's this movie with Josh Hartnett and Rachael Leigh Cook on the cover?...

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