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Suffragette Review

Excellent

Based on real events a century ago that still resonate loudly today, this movie takes a cleverly fictionalised angle to explore the suffrage movement, a story that astonishingly has never been put on film before. Screenwriter Abi Morgan's script brings intelligence and honesty to the characters, avoiding cliches to make the political statements as fresh and important today as they were back then. And it's anchored by another solid performance from Carey Mulligan.

She plays Maud, a young woman in 1912 London who has grown up working in a grim laundry, which is where she met her husband Sonny (Ben Whishaw). Then her best friend Violet (Anne-Marie Duff) introduces her to the women's voting rights movement led by Emmeline Pankhurst (Meryl Streep). And Maud is intrigued, joining with her local chemist's wife Edith (Helena Bonham Carter) for protests and getting involved in civil disobedience. This puts her on the list of offenders followed by a tenacious policeman (Brendan Gleeson), and Sonny finds it very difficult to cope with the embarrassment. So Maud has to make a very tough decision about whether to carry on the fight.

Making the film's main characters working-class heroines was a clever way to draw in modern-day audiences. In real life, the suffragettes were middle-class women who didn't particularly want any of the working class (men or women) to have the vote. But of course, once the movement started, it didn't end there, ultimately extending right through society. And the film cleverly mixes these fictional characters alongside real historical figures to bring the events vividly to life. Mulligan provides the emotional gut punch as an intelligent but uneducated woman who has been abused all her life and is finally standing up for herself. Her scenes with each of the supporting cast have real power, including less sympathetic characters like Whishaw's loving but fearful husband.

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Suffragette - Teaser Trailer


Throughout the late 19th Century and early 20th Century, a secret war took place on the streets of England. For years, women of all ages and classes had fought for their right to vote, although they used politics and reason as their biggest weapon. When no clear results were seen, a specialist group formed a more radical idea - to take the political campaign out of the shadows and into the streets, with protests and fighting to gain what was theirs by right. But as the government fights back even harder, desperate times call for desperate measures. 

Continue: Suffragette - Teaser Trailer

Ill Manors Review


Weak
Musician Ben Drew (aka Plan B) shows impressive skill in his filmmaking debut, even if he's chosen a badly overworked genre. So no matter how stylish the film is, the lack of a central plot or an original theme make it difficult to care what happens.

On a bleak East London estate, Aaron (Ahmed) is a low-life dealer hanging out with his thuggish best pal Ed (Skrein). When Ed's phone goes missing, they trace it to crack-addict Michelle (Mond), who they force to turn tricks to pay Ed back. Meanwhile, a young kid (Indianda) must prove himself if he wants to join a gang led by Marcel (Sagar). Later, Aaron has a chance encounter with terrified Katya (Press), who abandons her baby with him. Unable to find her, Aaron lets Ed arrange a black-market adoption.

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'iLL Manors' World Premiere Held At The Empire Cinema - Arrivals

Natalie Press Wednesday 30th May 2012 'iLL Manors' world premiere held at the Empire cinema - Arrivals

Natalie Press
Delilah and Natalie Press
Guest, Natalie Press and Empire Cinema
Natalie Press
Natalie Press

Ill Manors Trailer


Ill Manors follows the hardships of six unrelated people in London - Kirby, and ex-drug dealer fresh from prison; Ed (Skrein), a ruthless thug with his own agendas; the drug-dependent Michelle (Anouska Mond); Jake, who has somehow got tangled up in gang-related affairs; Chris (Allen), who is seeking revenge; Katya (Press), who seeks to escape; and Aaron (Ahmed) who is intent on doing the right thing.

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Island Review


Good
Dark and atmospheric, this film is worth seeing just for the way it continually pushes us around emotionally. Although the plot never quite comes into clear focus, and it refuses to let us engage with the characters.

While working on a human geography project as part of her studies, Nikki (Press) travels to an isolated Scottish island and presents herself as a prospective tenant at isolated house owned by her birth mother Phyllis (McTeer), who doesn't recognise her. As she plots her revenge against the woman who abandoned her, she's surprised to discover that she has a brother, Calum (Morgan). But her continual questions about their husband-father are blanked, and life on the island becomes increasingly intriguing as she seeks answers about her past.

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At The Jennifer Hudson Party Held At The Ivy Club.

Nathalie Press - Nathalie Press , London, England - at the Jennifer Hudson party held at The Ivy Club. Wednesday 20th April 2011

Nathalie Press

At The RTS Programme Awards At The Grosvenor House Hotel.

Natalie Press - Natalie Press, London, England - at the RTS Programme Awards at The Grosvenor House Hotel. Tuesday 15th March 2011

Natalie Press
Natalie Press
Natalie Press
Natalie Press

Range Rover - 40th Anniversary Party Held At The Orangery, Kensington Palace.

Natalie Press Thursday 1st July 2010 Range Rover - 40th anniversary party held at The Orangery, Kensington Palace. London, England

Natalie Press
Natalie Press
Natalie Press

Maison Martin Margiela '20' The Exhibition - Private View, Held At The Embankment Galleries, Somerset House.

Natalie Press - Wednesday 2nd June 2010 at Somerset House London, England

Natalie Press
Natalie Press

Nightwatching Review


Very Good
As visually fascinating as anything Greenaway has done, this film's narrative is so convoluted that it's virtually impossible to follow unless you know the life story of Rembrandt. And even then it's a challenge.

When he's commissioned to paint a local militia group in 1642 Amsterdam, Rembrandt (Freeman) has premonitions of trouble, but goes ahead and creates a fiercely untraditional painting that reveals rather too many secrets about the musketeers depicted in it. While painting it, his sparky wife (Birthistle) gives birth to his son, but becomes seriously ill in the process, eventually causing him to turn to the family nurses (Holmes and May) for company. And when complete, the portrait, The Night Watch, has drastic repercussions on his career.

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Red Road Review


Excellent
It's a sign of the times that in a film like Andrea Arnold's Red Road, the presence of omnipresent CCTV cameras which spiderweb Glasgow, are controlled from a central command called City Eye, and can peek into practically every corner of the city, is barely remarked upon. This is not a film that is going to waste time maundering about the implications of ubiquity of surveillance in 21st century life (especially in the British Isles, which has a particular fetish for filming their citizens at all times); instead it's just one more sad detail of the characters' shabby, limited lives in a shabby and limited world. Technology without progress, knowledge without wisdom, security without safety.

For all the watching going on in Red Road, there is precious little safety -- in fact one of the tropes that writer/director Arnold (in an extremely impressive feature debut) insistently returns to is the resolute unsafety of these people's worlds, no matter how much technology surrounds them. Arnold's protagonist is Jackie (the fantastically affecting Kate Dickie) a bracingly cold and shut-off woman who works at the City Eye, controlling a bank of cameras with a joystick, occasionally zooming on something menacing or just plain out of the ordinary, watching. Her contact with the human race is limited practically to these TV screens, having shut herself off from her parents and seemingly keeping no friends; the only relationship with any regularity we see is a functional and depressing affair carried on with a married man occasionally in his van. Arnold sinks viewers deep into Jackie's self-induced loneliness, letting out only the faintest hints about what tragedy has pushed her into this suffocating state (Was there a husband? A daughter?), before Jackie sees a man's face on the camera one day which she remembers from her past.

Continue reading: Red Road Review

My Summer Of Love Review


Excellent
Though My Summer of Love may seem like the title of either a junior high school report or a Sixties memoir, it is, in fact, the latest from acclaimed director Pawel Pawlikowski (Last Resort). Regardless, it includes all the experimentation, cultish religious ecstasy, adolescent awkwardness, and malaise the first two assumptions would suggest. The difference is it's tied together with a visually engaging bow by a writer/director who only seems to be getting stronger.

Mona (Nathalie Press) is a disaffected teen living in the English countryside. Feeling alienated from her ex-con born-again brother Phil (Paddy Considine) who's turned their family bar into a makeshift church, she strikes up a friendship with Tamsin (Emily Blunt), a boarding school student at home for the summer. Tamsin, too, has some grief in her life. Her unfaithful father never gives her the time of day, and she has yet to get over the death of her sister. Tamsin and Mona's combined disillusionment and loneliness slowly turns to affection, and the two begin a passionate affair.

Continue reading: My Summer Of Love Review

My Summer Of Love Review


OK
Akin to 1994's "Heavenly Creatures" withoutthe murder and fantasy sequences -- and with a twist of distrust hangingin the air -- "My Summer of Love" is a squirmy parable abouttwo 17-year-old girls from opposite ends of the social spectrum who findin each other's company a powerful but uneasy release from their individualangst.

Mona (Natalie Press) is a plain and provincial redheadwith an artistic bent, sexually gullible and unsure of herself. She's beenmiserable since her caretaker older brother (the superb Paddy Considine)returned from prison, adamantly (read: desperately) clinging to newfoundborn-again Christianity.

Tamsin (Emily Blunt) is a brazen, sultry hothouse brunettebooted from a series of private schools ("Apparently I'm a bad influence")and seemingly haunted by the death of her anorexic sister while stayingthe summer at her neglectful daddy's manse in the hills above Mona's depressedYorkshire factory town.

When they meet, this pair with nothing in common discoversan addicting synergy between them that escalates into obsession that knowsfew boundaries, be they psychological or even sexual. "If you leaveme, I'll kill you," they swear to each other as if it were the mostloving promise in the world.

Continue reading: My Summer Of Love Review

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Natalie Press Movies

Suffragette Movie Review

Suffragette Movie Review

Based on real events a century ago that still resonate loudly today, this movie takes...

Suffragette - Teaser Trailer

Suffragette - Teaser Trailer

Throughout the late 19th Century and early 20th Century, a secret war took place on...

Ill Manors Movie Review

Ill Manors Movie Review

Musician Ben Drew (aka Plan B) shows impressive skill in his filmmaking debut, even if...

Ill Manors Trailer

Ill Manors Trailer

Ill Manors follows the hardships of six unrelated people in London - Kirby, and ex-drug...

Island Movie Review

Island Movie Review

Dark and atmospheric, this film is worth seeing just for the way it continually pushes...

Nightwatching Movie Review

Nightwatching Movie Review

As visually fascinating as anything Greenaway has done, this film's narrative is so convoluted that...

Fifty Dead Men Walking Trailer

Fifty Dead Men Walking Trailer

Watch the trailer for Fifty Deadmen Walking.During the mid 80's the IRA were at their...

Cass Trailer

Cass Trailer

Watch the trailer for CassCass was a Jamaican orphan adopted by an aged white couple...

Red Road Movie Review

Red Road Movie Review

It's a sign of the times that in a film like Andrea Arnold's Red Road,...

My Summer of Love Movie Review

My Summer of Love Movie Review

Though My Summer of Love may seem like the title of either a junior high...

My Summer of Love Movie Review

My Summer of Love Movie Review

Akin to 1994's "Heavenly Creatures" withoutthe murder and fantasy sequences -- and with a twist...

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