Nastassja Kinski

Nastassja Kinski

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Nastassja Kinski Seen At Tegel Airport

Nastassja Kinski - Nastassja Kinski seen at Tegel airport - Berlin, Germany - Wednesday 17th February 2016

Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski

Cinema For Peace At Konzerthaus At Gendarmenmarkt

Nastassja Kinski - 66th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - Cinema for Peace gala at Konzerthaus at Gendarmenmarkt - Berlin, Germany - Monday 15th February 2016

Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski

Gold Meets Golden At Equinox Sports Club

Nastassja Kinski - Celebrities attends 3rd annual "Gold Meets Golden" at Equinox Sports Club - West LA Flagship Lounge. at Equinox Sports Club – West LA Flagship Lounge - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 21st February 2015

Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski

LAFF 'I'm So Excited' Premiere

Nastassja Kinski - 2013 Los Angeles Film Festival - "I'm So Excited" Opening Night Gala Premiere - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 13th June 2013

Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski

8th Annual Los Angeles Italia Film, Fashion And Art Festival

Nastassja Kinski - 8th Annual Los Angeles Italia Film, Fashion and Art Festival - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 17th February 2013

Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski
Nastassja Kinski and Yuka Sano
Nastassja Kinski and Yuka Sano

Paris, Texas Review


Extraordinary
There is a mysticism that enshrouds Paris. The grand cityscape of the Eiffel Tower and Arc de Triomphe situated on the River Seine gives the city of lights its romanticism. But in Paris, Texas, there is only a desolate plot of land that holds the dreams of Travis Henderson. And though the earth is scorched and he has never seen the lot, except in a picture he carries with him, it is no less important. It's this dichotomy between the universal, romantic reminiscence of Paris, France, and Travis' Paris that drives him to reconnect with his 10-year-old son and estranged girlfriend.

Wim Wender's film opens with Travis wandering in a Texas desert. Lost for four years, Travis' brother, Walt, travels to Texas to claim him and takes him back to Los Angeles where Walt lives with his wife and Travis' son. Given Travis' absence, his son has all but forgotten about him -- causing Travis to clean up his act and get his life back in order. Given that Travis doesn't say a word for the first 20 minutes of the film, it's a little bizarre when the film focuses solely on him in the second and third acts -- turning a blind eye to Walt and his wife, who have been moving the story along for the first half.

Continue reading: Paris, Texas Review

The Claim Review


Good
In the vein of Unforgiven comes this moody western about another small town in the middle of nowhere, struggling with its place in a world quickly passing it by.

Central to the story is Daniel Dillon (Peter Mullan), mayor of the town of Kingdom Come, Nevada, located on the spot of the gold claim he struck during the 1849 gold rush, some 20 years earlier. Or so we are led to believe. As it turns out, Dillon's claim was given to him in trade -- in trade for his wife and daughter, sold as if they were slaves.

Continue reading: The Claim Review

Cat People (1982) Review


Good
I've never seen the original 1942 Cat People (I have now -Ed.), but I have a hard time imagining it bears much resemblance to this 1982 remake, courtesy of director Paul Schrader (American Gigolo), writer Alan Ormsby (who wrote Porky's II and four of the Substitute movies), and stars Nastassja Kinski and Malcolm McDowell.

Bizarre from frame one, the story tells of an ancient race of werewolf-like cat people, doomed to turn into black leopards (is that the same thing as a panther?) if they mate with humans. The only way to maintain human form, they say, is to mate with another cat person -- or, apparently, to devour a human in a lusty rage.

Continue reading: Cat People (1982) Review

Say Nothing Review


Weak
Unfaithful probably stole Say Nothing's thunder, whatever thunder it might have had, that is, sending this movie straight to Skinemax or whatever other dumping ground it ended up in.

The story has become awfully familiar: Disgruntled woman (Nastassja Kinski) cheats on boozing hubby (Hart Bochner), only she doesn't realize her fling (William Baldwin) is actually a super-wealthy tycoon. No problem, except that said tycoon inexplicably hires the out-of-luck (and suddenly reformed) hubby shortly thereafter and immediately sets out to destroy the marriage he's wedged himself into. Trouble ensues.

Continue reading: Say Nothing Review

Savior Review


Weak
Dennis Quaid as vengeful mercenary in Bosnia, trying to find himself through the protection of an unwanted baby? Yeah, that's what I said, too.

Tess Review


Good
Hunkering down with any movie adaptation of a Thomas Hardy novel (Jude, The Claim) invariably means you're in for a long, depressing look at life. Tess stands as one of the longest and saddest of the lot -- this one offered up by Roman Polanski as one of a handful of adaptations of Tess of the d'Urbervilles, one of those famous high school assignments that you didn't get around to reading.

Tess Durbeyfield (Nastassja Kinski) is a naive English country girl sent to do good by her family. She's not two feet out of her cottage when she encounters the aristocratic Alec d'Urberville (Leigh Lawson). Legend has it the similarity in names is no coincidence -- the two families descended from the same royals centuries ago. Never mind the incest, though, here comes the lovin', and before you know it, Tess isn't just taking care of chickens at d'Urberville manor, she's pregnant to boot.

Continue reading: Tess Review

Susan's Plan Review


Weak
Yea, and the masses cried for a time when John Landis would once again make a passable movie instead of doing direct-to-cable crap like this. Amen.

Continue reading: Susan's Plan Review

The Lost Son Review


Good
Forget 8MM. The Lost Son's look at a troubled P.I. who gets caught up in what turns out to be a nasty child prostitution ring is exceptional considering it's barely anything more than a direct-to-video thriller packed with stars that barely speak English.

French ¾ber-actor Daniel Auteuil stars as Xavier, an investigator with a seedy past -- he's had a mysterious scrape or two, and now, to get by, he does double time, accepting money for an engagement only to blackmail the subject for more. When a wealthy woman (Nastassja Kinski) and her family hire Xavier to find a grown man who's gone missing, Xavier ends up cracking a child porn gang wide open.

Continue reading: The Lost Son Review

Red Letters Review


Bad
Painfully awful mystery flick has Hawthorne-expert Coyote falling for a prison inmate (Kinski) via postal mail. About as slow as a fourth-class parcel, Red Letters is so convoluted and just plain stupid you'll stop wondering why it went straight to cable after about, oh, 35 minutes.

An American Rhapsody Review


Very Good

Film doesn't get any more passionately personal than writer-director Eva Gardos' semi-autobiographical "An American Rhapsody," the deeply stirring story of a Hungarian family torn apart by Cold War persecution, reunited through immigration and tested by the stubborn determination of a teenage daughter to explore her roots.

Gardos lived with guardians in rural Hungary until she was 6 because her aristocratic Budapest parents -- publishers by trade -- had to leave their infant daughter behind in order to escape arrest in the wake of the 1949 Communist coup d'etat.

Resettled in suburban Los Angeles after an arduous, dangerous trek across barbed-wired borders to Switzerland, her mother persevered by persistently petitioning every politician and aid organization she could find for help securing little Eva's transport to America. When she finally succeeded, the girl was spirited from the arms of the only family she'd known to be flown to a strange new world of subdivisions, televisions, big sisters and Elvis Presley songs.

Continue reading: An American Rhapsody Review

Nastassja Kinski

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Nastassja Kinski Movies

The Claim Movie Review

The Claim Movie Review

In the vein of Unforgiven comes this moody western about another small town in the...

Cat People (1982) Movie Review

Cat People (1982) Movie Review

I've never seen the original 1942 Cat People (I have now -Ed.), but I have...

The Lost Son Movie Review

The Lost Son Movie Review

Forget 8MM. The Lost Son's look at a troubled P.I. who gets caught up...

Town & Country Movie Review

Town & Country Movie Review

Past-their-prime actors don't die -- they pick up studio paychecks for hack projects like Town...

An American Rhapsody Movie Review

An American Rhapsody Movie Review

An American Rhapsody offers us an example of teen acting gone marvelously right. As...

Fathers' Day Movie Review

Fathers' Day Movie Review

What are the odds that the two would-be fathers of one woman's son would be...

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