Naomi Harris

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New York premiere of 'Southpaw'

Naomi Harris - New York premiere of 'Southpaw' for THE WRAP at AMC Loews Lincoln Square - Arrivals - New York City, United States - Monday 20th July 2015

Naomi Harris

European premiere of 'Entourage'

Naomi Harris - European premiere of 'Entourage' at the Vue West End in London - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 9th June 2015

Naomi Harris
Naomi Harris
Naomi Harris

'Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty' private viewing

Naomi Harris - 'Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty' private viewing at the V&A museum in London - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 12th March 2015

Naomi Harris

Daniel Craig Raves About The Cast Of 'Spectre'


Daniel Craig Sam Mendes Christoph Waltz Dave Bautista Ralph Fiennes Ben Whishaw Naomi Harris Andrew Scott Lea Seydoux Monica Bellucci

"We've spent two years getting this together," said Daniel Craig while discussing the announcement of 'Spectre' "and there's been so much hard work and effort". For his fourth outing in the iconic role of James Bond, Craig will reunite with director Sam Mendes and the cast of 'Skyfall', as well as bringing an old foe back from the Sean Connery days.

Daniel Craig as James Bond in 'Skyfall'
Daniel Craig as James Bond in 'Skyfall'

When asked about the return of Mendes as the film's director, Craig responded by saying "He's the only guy for the job. He did such a wonderful job with 'Skyfall' and came down to do the next one and it just seemed to be the obvious choice." Following on from 'Skyfall' is not going to be an easy task, however, as the third film in the Bond reboot series made over 1 billion USD worldwide and took home two Academy Awards. Furthermore, the recent Sony hacks have revealed that 'Spectre' was supposedly coming in far over budget, and with a script that needed drastic work.

Continue reading: Daniel Craig Raves About The Cast Of 'Spectre'

The launch of the new James Bond film, 'Spectre' - Arrivals

Naomi Harris, Lea Seydoux, Daniel Craig, Monica Bellucci and Christoph Waltz - Shots of the stars of 'Spectre' the new James Bond film as they arrived at the films launch event at the Pinewood studios in London, United Kingdom - Thursday 4th December 2014

Ben Whilshaw, Naomi Harris, Daniel Craig and Ralph Fiennes
Ben Whilshaw, Naomi Harris, Daniel Craig and Ralph Fiennes
Naomi Harris and Daniel Craig
Naomi Harris
Naomi Harris

Naomi Harris at London fashion week

Naomi Harris - Naomi Harris pictured at the Burberry fashion show at London fashion week - London, United Kingdom - Monday 17th February 2014

Naomi Harris
Naomi Harris
Naomi Harris
Naomi Harris
Naomi Harris

Daniel Craig and the Rest of the Skyfall Gang Reunite at the BAFTA Britannia Awards


Daniel Craig Naomi Harris Berenice Marlohe Quentin Tarantino Kerry Washington

Daniel Craig at the BAFTA Britannias

Daniel Craig attends the BAFTA Britannia Awards in Los Angeles on the eve of Skyfall's US release

A host of big names made an appearance in Los Angeles as the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) stopped over Stateside for their annual Britannia Awards. Daniel Craig was the chief name in attendance, and he walked off with British Artist of the Year Award at the BBC America-sponsored event, causing the media to go into overdrive as he displayed some rare PDA with his wife Rachel Weisz upon being announcd the winner. He was far from the only star there though, with Kerry Washington, director Quentin Tarantino and South Park creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker all among those at the gala.

Continue reading: Daniel Craig and the Rest of the Skyfall Gang Reunite at the BAFTA Britannia Awards

'Skyfall' Bond Girls Are Exceptional Claims Daniel Craig


Daniel Craig Naomi Harris Berenice Marlohe

As anticipation builds for release of the new James Bond film Skyfall, Daniel Craig has been telling anyone who'll listen that the latest Bond girls are as good as any to feature in the famous movie series. Naomie Harris and Berenice Marlohe are the actresses playing leading roles in the forthcoming film, and Craig told The Metro "The casting of the Bond girls with Naomie and Bérénice... Finding two exceptionally beautiful girls who are very serious actresses. Both of them wanted to be in a Bond movie."

Craig, who will be playing Bond for the third time in Skyfall, added: "Both of them have bought totally individual characters to their parts and for me on the set it's just been a joy to play with these people." Harris meanwhile said that the role of the Bond girl had changed, something welcome and important in keeping up to date with 21st century attitudes surrounding women. "I don't think it's enough to look pretty anymore. It may well have been true in the past but not anymore" Harris commented. Of her character in the film she said "She kind of sees her self as Bond's equal."

She admitted that she was delighted to be involved in the franchise, saying: "I loved the Bond movies for so many years and there are so many amazing, hugely talented women who have been Bond girls so it's a huge honour to be part of that legacy so I feel incredibly proud. I still can't believe it. I have to pinch myself every day pretty much."


August Review


Grim
In Austin Chick's August, Josh Harnett is having a bad day. As pre-9/11 dot-com hotshot Tom Sterling, he's seen his parents and tech wonk brother treating him with contempt, the girl he's pining for giving him the brush-off, and his startup Internet company blowing up in his face. Drinking morosely at a bar (or as morosely as Hartnett can get) he lashes out at a fellow techie bandit who has just returned to the bar with a condemnatory, "Guys like you ain't got no vision, ain't got no passion, ain't got no soul." True enough. Tom is of course talking about himself but also, by extension, Hartnett's performance and Chick's film.

Chick's morality tale (a sort of insipid remake of Force of Evil except with techno sharks instead of gangsters) is all gloss and pizzazz but mostly pizz and no azz. August deals with two brothers, Tom and Josh (Adam Scott), who live large during the dot-com boom of '01, creating an in-the-moment start up called Landshark that is riding the top of the bubble with Joshua as the creative designer of the site and Tom as the obnoxious highfalutin promoter and resident SOB. Much like the World Wide Widget company in the satirical musical How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, there is no explanation given for what Landshark actually does; the company just is. But then it isn't. Soon after the opening credits and five months after its inception, the company is in the toilet and Tom is struggling to keep up the appearance of success for both the company and himself. But as in the Talking Heads song, they are both on the Road to Nowhere and somehow Tom has to come to grips with failure and regain his humanity, while looking out for his brother and his new family.

Continue reading: August Review

Miami Vice Review


Terrible
You can learn a lot about Michael Mann's updated Miami Vice by listening to Glenn Frey. It's true. Many questions surrounding this remake are answered using the lyrics to Frey's prophetic "Smuggler's Blues," a song made famous by the seminal 1980s buddy-cop drama that sold sex and sidearms on South Beach.For instance, why would Mann - a respected filmmaker riding a decade-long creative hot streak - blow the dust off a hopelessly dated property he last executive-produced almost 20 years ago? As Frey sings, "It's the lure of easy money. It's got a very strong appeal." And why would a studio support Mann's impulsive let's-get-the-band-back-together decision after projects from Bewitched to The Dukes of Hazzard demonstrate that audiences don't care to relive the past? Frey confesses, "It's a losing proposition. But one you can't refuse."In its prime, the television-sized Vice influenced the fashion industry, peddled synthesizer-laden soundtracks, and made Don Johnson a household name. This realistically superficial recycling, however, will cure insomnia, set the advancement of digital cinematography back a few years, and unsuccessfully argue in favor of the mullet as an acceptable coif style.The story lost me almost immediately, but looked cool doing it. Undercover detectives James "Sonny" Crockett (Colin Farrell) and Ricardo Tubbs (Jamie Foxx) are deep into one case when a former informant contacts them claiming that a deal he was working went bad. To clean up the mess, Crockett and Tubbs must infiltrate a sprawling drug cartel lorded over by menacing Jose Yero (John Ortiz, mimicking Al Pacino's Tony Montana character) and sultry Isabella (Gong Li, her broken English disrupting half of her lines).Vice marks a return for Mann in multiple ways. He's back on the beach with Crockett and Tubbs, characters he last manipulated in 1989. More importantly, it's the director's first mature cops-and-robbers thriller since 1995's Heat, a modern classic which also presented an in-depth analysis of individuals operating on opposite sides of the law. Part of Heat's allure, though, was the intimate knowledge we collected about Pacino's bulldog detective and Robert De Niro's elusive thief. Watching the former sacrifice his marriage and family life for the sake of the job added juicy drama to his otherwise routine investigation.Vice lacks that human touch, those insights into the men away from their beats. Mann ladles on ample attitude, while his chiseled leading men provide plenty of posturing. Mannequin Vice might have made for a better title. Foxx and Farrell buy into the shout-and-scowl method, with an emphasis on the latter. But the script neglects to fill in details about Sonny and Ricardo beyond quick peeks into their active bedrooms. It's a fault built into the premise. These men exist deep undercover, so the lives they lead are smokescreens - which makes it difficult to care whether they continue to blow smoke or not.As a whole, the stiff and procedural Vice moves too slowly to hold our interests. It's a thinking-man's summer picture, code for "no action, plenty of conversation." Normally that's fine, but Mann pens lines that would have been too cheesy even for the '80s program. Crockett repeatedly claims, "No one has ever treaded where we are now." We just don't believe him. One villain barks, "He wants to promise them silver, but pay them in lead!" James Bond's foes made more effective threats.Oscar-winning cinematographer Dion Beebe continues to experiment with digital technology at Mann's request. It works when the action shifts to the open seas, but his night shoots produce muddy visuals that - while realistic - are ugly and drab. I guess when compared to the original Vice's pastel color scheme, it's an improvement.Frey once again gets the last words. I'm paraphrasing a few of his somber lyrics so that they properly sum up how I felt leaving my screening. I'm sorry it went down like this, and the audience had to lose. It's the nature of this business. It's the critic's blues.Watch that wake!

28 Days Later Review


Excellent
Although its title might lead you to believe that they actually made a sequel to the awful Sandra Bullock movie about alcoholism, 28 Days Later is anything but a journey through rehab. In fact, the disturbing, grotesque nature of the film makes rehab look like a peaceful picnic at the zoo... well, just as long as there aren't monkeys at that zoo.

The recipe for 28 Days Later is quite simple: half Outbreak, half Night of the Living Dead, and maybe a dash or two of Planet of the Apes. While the ingredients are familiar, thankfully, director Danny Boyle, who also helmed the bizarre Trainspotting, contributes his own unique seasonings, turning this acidic dish into a journey through hell-on-earth; it's one of the most frightening movies of the year.

Continue reading: 28 Days Later Review

28 Days Later Review


OK

The eerily and utterly empty streets of a looted London in the early scenes of "28 Days Later" are a perfectly chilling primer for the gritty neo-B-movie horror to follow in this incisive, underground-styled revival of the zombie flick genre.

Seen through the eyes of Jim (Cillian Murphy), an injured bicycle messenger who has just awoken from a coma in a deserted hospital, it seems as if he's the last person alive as he stumbles alone down street after echoing street in stolen scrubs and tennis shoes, bellowing "Helllloooo!" and getting no response except from frightened pigeons.

But he's not alone. Oh, boy is he not alone.

Continue reading: 28 Days Later Review

Naomi Harris

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