Nancy Meyers

Nancy Meyers

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The Intern - Extended Trailer Trailer


Retired and, frankly, bored, 70-year-old Ben Whittaker decides the quiet life is not one he needs right now and instead opts for a career move. He applies as a senior intern for a fashion website following the death of his wife, and despite his age he is taken on by the young company CEO Jules Ostin. It isn't long before Ostin beccomes increasingly reliant on Whittaker as he becomes something of a grandfather figure to her; his old-fashioned charm, positive energy and kind wisdown beguiling her as she struggles under the pressure of managing an ever-growing business. Even the board are suggesting she take on a new manager to take off some of the pressure, so Whittaker is exactly what she needs to boost her self esteem and help her stay on track. She's not the only one with a soft spot for Whittaker; the youth of the rest of the office are being taught a thing or two about relationships of all kinds, as he himself learns about the beauty of the modern world.

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The Intern Trailer


Ben Whittaker is a 70-year-old retiree who has little left in his life to keep him occupied, now that his wife has passed away. He's keen to re-start and take on new job and discovers a vacant position for a senior intern at a fashion website. He gets the job to much surprise from the rest of the company. The site is run by Jules Ostin; a young entrepreneur who's visibly struggling in her role as CEO and feels like she's on the verge of a crisis. Ben becomes an unlikely confidante, boosting her self-esteem with words of wisdom and worldly advice, as she in turn shows him the wonders of modern life and technology. The other young employees are starting to feel that they could take a leaf out of his book too, as the smart and sophisticated Ben proves firmly that there's life in the old dog yet.

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ELLE 20th annual Women in Hollywood celebration

Nancy Meyers - ELLE 20th annual Women in Hollywood celebration at Four Seasons Hotel Beverly Hills - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 22nd October 2013

ELLE 20th annual Women in Hollywood celebration

Nancy Meyers - ELLE 20th annual Women in Hollywood celebration at Four Seasons Hotel Beverly Hills - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st October 2013

2013 Crystal + Lucy Awards

Sofia Coppola, Nancy Meyers and Nicola Maramotti - 2013 Crystal + Lucy Awards held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Wednesday 12th June 2013

Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola and Nancy Meyers

It's Complicated Review


OK
There's something enjoyable about silly romantic comedies that centre on middle-aged people for a change, especially when the characters are as well-cast as these. And even if the film is both over-long and rather pointless.

Jane (Streep) has been divorced from Jake (Baldwin) for 10 years and is starting to relax around him again, despite some bitterness toward his new, younger wife (Bell). So when Jane and Jake start having an affair, it's almost like revenge. But it also jeopardises Jane's tentative courtship with her shy architect Adam (Martin). And Jane knows there'd be even bigger problems if her three adult kids (Fitzgerald, Kazan and Parrish) found out what she was up to.

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It's Complicated Trailer


Watch the trailer for It's Complicated

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Irreconcilable Differences Review


Good
Back in the "glory days" of the mid-1990s, Irreconcilable Differences was a cable television mainstay. It played at least once every week and often ran two or three times on weekends. For whatever reason I watched it over and over again, and in the process, sort of fell in love with this totally imperfect yet sneakily lovable movie.

Over a decade after it vanished from the cable TV lazy weekend repertoire, the film is finally getting a DVD release -- fittingly, as part of a series called "The Lost Collection." After revisiting the movie, it sure is a far-fetched, silly trifle of a fairy tale, but it's still charming, and still believable in its own way. Irreconcilable Differences carries with it the same charisma that most Nancy Meyers-Charles Shyer comedies (Private Benjamin, Baby Boom, Father of the Bride) possess; these films are comfort food with a few sharp-edged nutrients added to the mix, stories about likable people who veer wildly off course but eventually find their way back to the Yellow Brick Road.

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The Holiday Review


OK
Nancy Meyers officially displaces Sleepless in Seattle director Nora Ephron as the crown-wearing queen of winsome, middle-concept romantic comedies.

Granted, the writer-director has been staffing a cache of headstrong and heartfelt female characters since she penned Private Benjamin in 1980. But it's the back-to-back-to-back musings of What Women Want, Something's Gotta Give, and her current affair The Holiday that elevate her to the summit of palatable sap.

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The Parent Trap (1998) Review


OK
Quaint remake of the original Trap, featuring the oh-so-cute Lohan as separated twins trying to reunite their parents. Amazing work for a kid her age, I must admit. Way too long, though.

Father Of The Bride Review


OK
It's really hard to feel too terribly sorry for the uptight George Banks (Steve Martin) when he bitches and moans about the ever-rising costs of his daughter's wedding in Father of the Bride. After all, he lives in overstuffed opulence in a Pasadena mini-mansion, runs his own company, drives an antique sports car, has a perfect and gainfully employed wife (Diane Keaton), and two perfect kids (Kimberly Williams and Kieran Culkin). Is the wedding cake outrageously expensive? Get over it, George.

In fact, that's what wife Nina (Keaton) spends most of the movie saying. And that's what you'll be saying, too, as George whines about having to buy a tuxedo, mopes about the disruption to the house, disapproves of the perfect young man (George Newbern) who has deflowered his daughter, and gets all frantic about meeting his future in-laws (who are even richer than he is). What's really happening, of course, is that George simply doesn't want his daughter to grow up, and his way of raging against life's forward progression is to get cranky about the upcoming wedding day. How do we know? Because George tells us in his self-pitying narration. This is the kind of movie that has plenty of both show and tell.

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Something's Gotta Give Review


Good
Writer/director Nancy Meyers has penned a little ditty about Jack and Diane in Something's Gotta Give. Sure, they go by different names and actually attempt to construct characters separated from their recognizable personas. Borrowing a page from his own playbook, Jack plays a chauvinistic womanizer with a penchant for 20-year-old women. Diane's a successful playwright. But they're still Jack Nicholson and Diane Keaton. They're the two-headed spectacle standing at center stage here, and our attention belongs on them.

The setup goes a little something like this. Jack's dating Marin (Amanda Peet), the feisty daughter of buttoned-up Diane. During a weekend trip to the Hamptons, Jack's libido loses out to his ticker, and he suffers a cardiac arrest. The local doctor (Keanu Reeves) prescribes plenty of bed rest for Jack, then makes a pitch for the lovely Diane, to her blushing delight.

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What Women Want Review


Good
If you looked like Mel Gibson, being able to read women's minds wouldn't be too imperative. Just give 'em those baby blues and flash those pearly whites, and you're in, baby. Or so you'd think. In What Women Want, directed by relationship comedy veteran Nancy Meyers, Gibson's character gets the real scoop on what the fairer sex thinks about him, and boy, is he in trouble. But his problems are the viewer's fortune.

As all-star Chicago ad man Nick Marshall, Gibson is awash in the stereotypical world of a man's man. Ogling chicks, living high on the hog, and being a major player is his life. He has unending self-confidence just because he can bed babes, but ho, what he doesn't know....

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Nancy Meyers

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