Nancy Cartwright

Nancy Cartwright

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The Playboy Party

Nancy Cartwright - The Playboy Party at Parq Nightclub during San Diego Comic-Con International 2015 at Parq - San Diego, California, United States - Saturday 11th July 2015

Hollywood Domino Charity Event - Arrivals

Nancy Cartwright - Hollywood Domino Charity Event in aid of the Nepal Earthquake Emergency Relief during the 68th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Arrivals at Cannes Film Festival - Cannes, France - Sunday 17th May 2015

Nancy Cartwright

29th Annual L. Ron Hubbard Achievement Awards For Winners Of The International Writers And Illustrators Of The Future Contests

Nancy Cartwright - 29th Annual L. Ron Hubbard Achievement Awards For Winners Of The International Writers And Illustrators Of The Future Contests - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Sunday 14th April 2013

Nancy Cartwright

Picture - Nancy Cartwright, Matt Groening , Tuesday 14th February 2012

Nancy Cartwright, Matt Groening and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame - Nancy Cartwright, Matt Groening Tuesday 14th February 2012 Creator of 'The Simpsons' Matt Groening receives a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Nancy Cartwright, Matt Groening and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame
Nancy Cartwright, Matt Groening and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame

Picture - Atmosphere , Tuesday 14th February 2012

Atmosphere, Nancy Cartwright and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame Tuesday 14th February 2012 Creator of 'The Simpsons' Matt Groening receives a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

The Simpsons: Season Ten Review


Good
By the end of the 1990s The Simpsons, the former enfant terrible of Rupert Murdoch's once upstart Fox Network, was well into its mature middle period of cultural acceptance. Earlier seasons (the first full episode aired back in December 1989) had seen a lot of attention paid to Bart's supposedly dangerous antisocial tendencies. But throughout the 1990s, the show had honed its satire and firmed up its roster of stellar voice actors, turning what had been seen first as the animated equivalent of Married With Children into something of a national institution. Seasons 8 and 9 had provided some of the show's greatest episodes, like "Homer's Enemy" (a devastating stab at American lassitude featuring Homer's nemesis Frank Grimes) and "Lisa the Skeptic" (where consumerism and religion get a similarly brutal treatment).

The 23 episodes of Season 10, broadcast between August 1998 and May 1999, reveal a show securely positioned both as money-making endeavor for Fox and well-regarded repository for smarty-pants satire. The show's writers, one of TV's greatest collections of comic minds since the stellar days of Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows, know exactly what notes to hit, and they hit them over and over again; meaning, in short: lots of Homer being an unthinking idiot. Homer could save Grandpa's life with a kidney transplant, but he's too scared of the operation and keeps running away, ala the climax of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Homer becomes a bodyguard. And so on. But all this attention also means that the writers are constantly feeding Homer the best lines ("Are you sure this is a sci-fi convention? It's full of nerds."), though Bart gets plenty of one-liners as well ("Dad, you make a great hippie; you're lazy and self-righteous!").

Continue reading: The Simpsons: Season Ten Review

The Simpsons Movie Review


Excellent
Best. Animated. Movie. Ever?

Not quite, Comic Book Guy, but the long-gestating and highly anticipated The Simpsons Movie does deliver a raucous feature-length venture that should satisfy faithful fans while still entertaining audience members who don't know Homer J. Simpson from a hole in the wall. By stretching a formula normally applied to a 22-minute episode, Simpsons lobs comically sacrilegious spitballs at an environmentally sensitive storyline that justifies its big-screen treatment. The humor stays irreverent without making the still-running sitcom irrelevant.

Continue reading: The Simpsons Movie Review

The Little Mermaid Review


Good
DIsney's animation team looked just about washed up (no pun intended) before The Little Mermaid hit theaters in 1989. Before The Little Mermaid, we had "classics" like The Great Mouse Detective and Oliver & Company. Afterwards, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King. The Little Mermaid was a turning point, reviving Disney's animation studio by grossing almost $110 million at the box office. It was also the last hand-painted Disney film, and the first to use computer animation.

That said, The Little Mermaid is not that great of a movie. The story is simplistic to an extreme, and the animation is extremely crude, a rush job that looks better if you aren't wearing your glasses. But thanks to a spunky heroine with a clamshell brassiere, a menacing villain, singing animals, and some calypso-inspired tunes, The Little Mermaid was a hit with kids and adults. It's certainly not brain food, but give this fish the credit its due: Turning around Disney.

Continue reading: The Little Mermaid Review

Rugrats Go Wild! Review


Terrible
You would have figured that with a show and movie series as delightfully cynical as Rugrats would have had the foresight to see that naming a movie with "Go Wild" in the title is just asking for insult. The similarities between the "Wild" movies go beyond the titles. Both take place in exotic getaway spots (a deserted island / a deserted alley outside a cheap New Orleans bar in Mardi Gras). Both involve a large cast of characters whose names you don't remember and whose voice you can barely make out through the sucking, slurping, or slurring of something or another. Oh yeah, and both are an utter waste of time unless your mind can't discern between binki-ness and kinkiness.

As if your kid will care, Rugrats Go Wild! is a cross between the shows Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys, in which a Rugrats family vacation leads to being stranded on a deserted island. The only other inhabitants are the Thornberrys, a dysfunctional set of explorers with a souped-up RV that makes the new Lexus SUVs look like bumper cars. The adults get the idea to start going Lord of the Flies. The babies get the idea to start going exploring, and I get the idea to leave the theatre before dealing with an extra hour and a half of wasted time.

Continue reading: Rugrats Go Wild! Review

The Little Mermaid Review


Good
DIsney's animation team looked just about washed up (no pun intended) before The Little Mermaid hit theaters in 1989. Before The Little Mermaid, we had "classics" like The Great Mouse Detective and Oliver & Company. Afterwards, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King. The Little Mermaid was a turning point, reviving Disney's animation studio by grossing almost $110 million at the box office. It was also the last hand-painted Disney film, and the first to use computer animation.

That said, The Little Mermaid is not that great of a movie. The story is simplistic to an extreme, and the animation is extremely crude, a rush job that looks better if you aren't wearing your glasses. But thanks to a spunky heroine with a clamshell brassiere, a menacing villain, singing animals, and some calypso-inspired tunes, The Little Mermaid was a hit with kids and adults. It's certainly not brain food, but give this fish the credit its due: Turning around Disney.

Continue reading: The Little Mermaid Review

Nancy Cartwright

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