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Nancy Allen Saturday 16th June 2012 weSPARK's 12th Anniversary event held at The Saban Theatre

Nancy Allen
Nancy Allen
Nancy Allen
Jay Mohr, Nancy Allen, Paul Reiser and Steve Valentine
Jay Mohr, Nancy Allen and Paul Reiser

Nancy Allen Sunday 10th October 2010 the Hollywood Show at the Marriott Convention Center in Burbank Burbank, California

Nancy Allen

Nancy Allen Monday 4th October 2010 Broadway Tonight! An Evening of Song & Dance at Alex Theater Los Angeles, California, USA

Nancy Allen

RoboCop Review


Extraordinary
RoboCop was released in 1987, and it's the sort of film that looks like it was made by somebody who knew America only from what he read in newspapers. Which may be close to the truth; Dutch director Paul Verhoeven had been living in the U.S. for less than a decade when he made this, his first big-budget Hollywood film. The script gleefully takes on every myth told about the U.S. during the Reagan '80s: Cities are dens of evil and full of constant gunplay, authority has been brought to heel by capitalism, technology has crushed our humanity to atoms, the media destroys the morals of children. RoboCop plays all of this out as a bloody farce - it's both funny and violent as hell -- but it also knows that there are kernels of truth in all those statements. Great science fiction sheds light on the real world by recreating it radically, and RoboCop is great science fiction - it's one of the best dystopian fantasies about America put to film.

The place is Detroit, the time sometime in the near future. The part of the city known as "Old Detroit" is a cesspool of grime, slums, and toxic sludge; "New Detroit" is an empty promise of a shining new city that we see only on billboards. The police force is privatized, and one of its officers, Alex J. Murphy (Peter Weller) is grotesquely wounded during a fight with a gang. OCP, the company running the force, has had back luck creating a purely mechanical cop. So it claims Murphy's nearly-dead body and transforms it into a man-machine hybrid that's programmed to perform police work ethically. On his first night on the beat, he stops a rape in progress, shooting the rapist in the crotch and telling the woman in a chill monotone: "You have suffered an emotional shock. I will notify a rape crisis center."

Continue reading: RoboCop Review

RoboCop 3 Review


Bad
As a franchise, there are several signs that you should stop making the movies, and top on the list of signs that the horse is dead is this: Nobody but the bit players who can't get work elsewhere come back for the next sequel.

Such is the case with RoboCop 3, which replaces its title character (Peter Weller) with Robert John Burke and cameos every other bit player from each part of the RoboCop franchise.

Continue reading: RoboCop 3 Review

Circuit Review


Bad
Maybe as a heterosexual female, the allure of the gay male dance/drug/sex circuit is something I simply cannot fathom. But having grown up, and knowing, my fair share of homosexuals, I doubt Circuit would be that much more appealing to gay men than a brief glimpse of eye candy.

Coupling disgracefully written dialogue with flailing bodily movements that substitute for acting, Circuit is the awkwardly paced soap opera-ish story of John (Jonathan Wade Drahos), the new kid in Hollywood, learning about having fun as a gay man. He was a cop in his home state of Illinois until his boss mentions that nobody wants to work with him due to his lifestyle, has he thought about living elsewhere? Having grown up there, you'd think he'd be smart enough to move to a more comfortable environment anyway without a condescending conversation to provoke him.

Continue reading: Circuit Review

RoboCop Review


Extraordinary
RoboCop was released in 1987, and it's the sort of film that looks like it was made by somebody who knew America only from what he read in newspapers. Which may be close to the truth; Dutch director Paul Verhoeven had been living in the U.S. for less than a decade when he made this, his first big-budget Hollywood film. The script gleefully takes on every myth told about the U.S. during the Reagan '80s: Cities are dens of evil and full of constant gunplay, authority has been brought to heel by capitalism, technology has crushed our humanity to atoms, the media destroys the morals of children. RoboCop plays all of this out as a bloody farce - it's both funny and violent as hell -- but it also knows that there are kernels of truth in all those statements. Great science fiction sheds light on the real world by recreating it radically, and RoboCop is great science fiction - it's one of the best dystopian fantasies about America put to film.

The place is Detroit, the time sometime in the near future. The part of the city known as "Old Detroit" is a cesspool of grime, slums, and toxic sludge; "New Detroit" is an empty promise of a shining new city that we see only on billboards. The police force is privatized, and one of its officers, Alex J. Murphy (Peter Weller) is grotesquely wounded during a fight with a gang. OCP, the company running the force, has had back luck creating a purely mechanical cop. So it claims Murphy's nearly-dead body and transforms it into a man-machine hybrid that's programmed to perform police work ethically. On his first night on the beat, he stops a rape in progress, shooting the rapist in the crotch and telling the woman in a chill monotone: "You have suffered an emotional shock. I will notify a rape crisis center."

Continue reading: RoboCop Review

Dressed To Kill Review


Very Good
Angie Dickenson isn't the one that's dressed to kill -- she's dressed to get killed. When she gets butchered by a razor-wielding mystery woman in an elevator, it's up to a cop (Dennis Franz) and her shrink (Michael Caine) to figure out who offed the nymphomaniacal Angie. Oh, and Angie's son teams up with the hooker who witnessed the murder to do an investigation of their own.

Continue reading: Dressed To Kill Review

Kiss Toledo Goodbye Review


Weak
An unfortunate film that premiered on cable, it's easy to see why Kiss Toledo Goodbye never made it into the theaters. For starters, it's virtually the same movie as the far funnier Mickey Blue Eyes, with the hapless Kevin (Rapaport) getting inexplicably sucked into the mob lifestyle thanks to the demise of mob boss Sal Fortuna (Forster). While Christopher Walken is always a great addition to any mobster flick, Rapaport frankly looks too much like he belongs in the mafia. Hugh Grant? A much better casting call. Too much of Toledo revolves around gunplay, with one shootout after another trying to stand in for plot development. In a word: Boring.

RoboCop 2 Review


Bad
George Orwell has to be turning over in his grave. Current political climate aside, something within Orwell just has to be annoyed at the endless procession of utterly stupid dystopia chic. The massive flow of filmmakers that have turned out sad sci-fi epics with worlds think they are honoring Orwell but instead are making a mockery of him.

RoboCop 2 is one of those grave-turners.

Continue reading: RoboCop 2 Review

Carrie (1976) Review


OK
I might be the only person in the world who thinks Brian DePalma's 1976 classic thriller Carrie (now out on DVD) is one of the most overrated, disappointing horror films of all time, but I stand behind my review, and I swear I can knock down just about any argument its defenders throw. This is my third viewing of the film. Every time I watch it, I find major problems in the story for all the same reasons.

Carrie is the tale of a high school senior named Carrie White, aptly played by Sissy Spacek, who spends her days at school as the center of nearly every cruel ridicule and her hours at home with a constricting, sadistic, fanatically religious mother (Piper Laurie). Let's just say the mother is like a female version of Sergeant Hartman in Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket, and Carrie is the distressed Private Pyle.

Continue reading: Carrie (1976) Review

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Circuit Movie Review

Circuit Movie Review

Maybe as a heterosexual female, the allure of the gay male dance/drug/sex circuit is something...

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