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22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards - Arrivals

Molly Parker - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at Shrine Auditorium, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Molly Parker
Molly Parker

22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards - Arrivals

Molly Parker - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at The Shrine Expo Hall, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Molly Parker
Molly Parker
Molly Parker
Molly Parker
Molly Parker
Molly Parker

21st Annual SAG (Screen Actors Guild) Awards

Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going - 21st Annual SAG (Screen Actors Guild) Awards at Los Angeles Shrine Exposition Center - Arrivals at Los Angeles Shrine Exposition Center, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th January 2015

Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going
Derek Cecil, Michael Kelly, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Joanna Going and Rachel Brosnahan

21st Annual SAG Awards

Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going - A host of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they arrived at the 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards which were held at the Shrine auditorium in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th January 2015

Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going
Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going
Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going
Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going
Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going
Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going

'House Of Cards' Season 2 Opens With A Shocking Death As Frank Celebrates His Birthday


Kevin Spacey Robin Wright Kate Mara Molly Parker Sandrine Holt Sebastian Arcelus

The opening episode of House of Cards season 2 will definitely go down as one of the most shocking in television history: one of the main characters has been brutally killed off; Claire is desperate for a baby; and Frank celebrates a subdued birthday. If you haven't seen it yet, stop reading now! Spoilers included!

Kevin Spacey
Kevin Spacey at the screening of House of Cards season 2 in L.A.

Frank's usual narrative directly to the camera only begins in the last minute and he leaves the audience with a menacing "Welcome Back." This sudden address is almost as shocking as the writer's decision to kill one of the main characters. Zoe Barnes (Kate Mara) and her journalist friends are attempting to uncover the truth about Congressman Peter Russo's (Corey Stoll) death. They know Frank is somehow connected and Zoe confronts him at a secret meeting in a subway station. Unfortunately for Zoe, Frank will do anything to ensure he's not under suspicion and pushes his former lover in front of a passing train. 

Continue reading: 'House Of Cards' Season 2 Opens With A Shocking Death As Frank Celebrates His Birthday

House Of Cards Season 2 Screening

Molly Parker - House of Cards Season 2 Screening - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 14th February 2014

Molly Parker
Molly Parker
Molly Parker
Molly Parker
Molly Parker
Molly Parker

Pure Review


OK
If Oscars were given out on a worldwide basis, 12-year old Harry Eden, the emotional core of this penetrating study of the family side of the drug culture in London, would win it hands down. His shadings of harsh disappointment amid valiant efforts as family caretaker come from intuition of the highest level.

His character's situation begins with a shocker. It's morning, and 10-year old Paul (Eden) is putting breakfast together for mom, who's a late sleeper. The last thing he prepares for the tray is a hypodermic needle with mom's fix, or "gear," as she calls it. What a good and thoughtful boy. Only, when Mel (Molly Parker) discovers what her eldest son has done, she's none too happy about it, precocity and thoughtfulness be damned.

Continue reading: Pure Review

The Confessor Review


Grim
I take no price in having sat through the entirety of The Confessor, but Stephen Rea's third billing convinced me that it might be worth my trouble. (Molly Parker isn't bad either, and even headliner Christian Slater has done some solid work -- just none of it in recent years.)

This film by aspiring assistant director/producer Lewin Webb is straight out of episodic TV. Think your lesser episode of, oh, Law & Order. A priest (Von Flores) is discovered red-handed with one of his flock, dead and covered with blood. The priest says he was just giving him the last rites, and that he knows what happened, but he can't divulge this due to confession's rules of confidentiality. Immediately on the case is Daniel Clemens (Slater), who's better known for his fundraising abilities and PR schmoozing. What he uncovers is a sort-of half-baked counterculture of gay Catholics (of which Flores may or may not have been a member)... and a murder plot that has absolutely nothing to do with any of that.

Continue reading: The Confessor Review

Rare Birds Review


Good
A surprisingly funny black comedy that has apparently been seen by no other person on the face of the earth, Rare Birds is worth seeking out on home video.

The story is about as dark as they come. A Newfoundland restaurateur named Dave (William Hurt) finds his business is failing, so he and neighbor Alphonse (Andy Jones) decide to fake the sighting of a very rare bird, thus drawing hordes of birdwatchers to the area... in turn, drumming up business for the restaurant.

Continue reading: Rare Birds Review

Suspicious River Review


Unbearable
You'll have trouble tracking down a more unwatchable movie this year than Suspicious River, which both firmly installs Molly Parker as the unequivocal goddess of freak-out not-quite-porn movies and will have you wondering just how bad a script has to be in order to get a movie made.

Director Lynne Stopkewich last worked with Parker on the film Kissed, which offered Parker as a mortuary embalmer who had sex with her dead clients. Here she's strictly having sex with the living. She's a receptionist at a seedy motel -- and she's the reason it's seedy. You pay $60 for the room. Then you pay $60 for her to come round and give you oral sex.

Continue reading: Suspicious River Review

Men With Brooms Review


OK
In the litany of movies about the sport of curling, Men with Brooms stands out as one of the best, if not the best ever!

Okay, there are no other movies about curling (to my knowledge), and this film is short of spectacular, but it's amusing enough to merit a peek. It's certainly Leslie Nielsen's best work in many years.

Continue reading: Men With Brooms Review

Nine Lives Review


Grim
A well-cast compilation film suffocating on its own self-importance, Nine Lives aims to tie together nine vastly different stories, but ends up telling hardly any of them well. The conceit of writer/director Rodrigo Garcia is to take nine vignettes, each centered around a different woman (usually in desperate circumstances), and give us a brief glimpse into her life before cutting away to the next one, while stringing a few connecting threads between them all. To ensure that he's not playing favorites, each piece is done in one single Steadicam shot and kept to only nine or ten minutes in length. A minor character from one vignette becomes a major player later on, or vice versa. As in literature, anthology works like this are a hit-and-miss affair, and in this case the misses far outnumber the ones that connect.

Nine Lives opens strong on Sandra (Elpidia Carrillo), an imprisoned mother. Mopping up a floor, she's threatened by fellow prisoners, and harassed by a guard (Miguel Sandoval) who's convinced she can give him information. Everyone tells Sandra she's not going to make it, but you think she just might be able to, hunkering down turtle-like and just plowing through the rest of her sentence. But then her daughter visits, and the phone doesn't work, sending Sandra into a stunning explosion of rage, like a mother bear kept from her cub. It's a short, unrelentingly powerful story, and done by itself it would stand as a sublime little tragedy. The same goes for the final piece, in which Glenn Close and Dakota Fanning (hardly a better match could be imagined) visit a cemetery and talk with sublime ease about not much at all. But then comes the rest of the film in between.

Continue reading: Nine Lives Review

The Center Of The World Review


Excellent
At a time when filmed eroticism between intelligent, complex adults is at something of a nadir, Wayne Wang comes along with the sexiest film in quite some time. The Center of the World deals with themes of loneliness and sexuality, and how the two are (or are not) intertwined.

Peter Sarsgaard plays Richard, a typical (almost stereotypical) techo-geek who made a million dollars the year prior and is about to make a lot more through an IPO. We are introduced to him and Florence (Molly Parker) as they check into a hotel suite in Las Vegas. Through a series of flashbacks, we learn that Richard recently met Florence, a freckled stunner, at the strip club where she works. Within five minutes, Wang sets the film's tone by having Parker perform an act that eliminates any chance for an R rating -- a shocking act for a lead actress in a mainstream film, and one that suggests that freedom of sexuality is a major issue here (and that Parker is an actress with few boundaries).

Continue reading: The Center Of The World Review

Sunshine Review


Weak

"Sunshine" is a complex, cross-generational saga about the social, romantic and soul-searching struggles of a proud Jewish family in early 20th Century Hungary. It's a three-hour epic that spans several decades, and while that's a long time to sit still for what is essentially dramatized genealogy, the movie's only unequivocal fault is that it is -- believe it or not -- far too short.

A labor of love from director Istvan Szabo ("Mephisto") -- who co-wrote the film with playwright Israel Horovitz and based it, in part, on episodes in his family history -- this is an intense and personal film with beauty and scope to spare. But with nearly a century of territory to cover and more than a dozen primary characters to enfold, even at 180 minutes, it feels rushed -- like the cinematic equivalent of Cliffs Notes for a great novel.

To give the audience something constant to hang on to throughout the picture, Szabo cast Ralph Fiennes to play three generations of men in the Sonnenschein family, a clan whose fortune comes from an heirloom recipe for tasty, healing herbal tonic known as A Taste of Sunshine -- turned into a popular drink in the late 19th Century by the Sonnenschein patriarch.

Continue reading: Sunshine Review

Center Of The World Review


OK

"Center of the World" is the kind of cerebral, sexually-charged, adult drama the NC-17 rating was created for, back before puritanical paranoids went on a smear campaign to defame the new rating into a black-listing tool.

Released unrated to avoid any stigma attached to its eroticism, the film is a vividly personal character study of an overly stressed, socially stunted dot-com programmer and his desperately warped courtship of a icily beautiful and very skeptical stripper.

Richard (Peter Sarsgaard) first meets Florence (Molly Parker) in a coffee shop while she's off-duty and almost out of the blue offers her $10,000 to spend a week with him in Las Vegas. Neurotic and lonely, this fellow latches onto the hope that with some time alone together such an unattainable girl might find something in him to love.

Continue reading: Center Of The World Review

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