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Mo'nique attending the premiere of David E. Talbert's new movie Almost Christmas - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 3rd November 2016

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Almost Christmas Trailer


It's everyone's favourite time of year, the Christmas holidays when families come together every year to celebrate the birth of Christ, what could possibly go wrong? In the case of the family in Almost Christmas, everything! This new Christmas comedy film directed by David.E Talbert follows the story of how a beloved patriarch asks his family for a Christmas all together stress free, where they all get along. 

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Mo'nique, Queen Latifah and Tika Sumpter - HBO Films presents a screening of 'Bessie' at The Museum of Modern Art - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 29th April 2015

Mo'nique, Queen Latifah and Tika Sumpter
L To R, Queen Latifah, Richard Plepler, Dee Rees, Mo'nique and Len Amato
L To R, Queen Latifah, Richard Plepler, Dee Rees, Mo'nique and Len Amato
L To R, Queen Latifah, Richard Plepler, Dee Rees, Mo'nique and Len Amato
Tika Sumpter, Tory Kittles, Queen Latifah, Richard Plepler, Dee Rees, Mo'nique, Len Amato and Khandi Alexander
Tika Sumpter, Tory Kittles, Queen Latifah, Richard Plepler, Dee Rees, Mo'nique, Len Amato, Khandi Alexander and Guests

Mo'nique, Queen Latifah, Tika Sumpter and Khandi Alexander - New York screening of 'Bessie' at The Museum of Modern Art - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 29th April 2015

Mo'nique, Queen Latifah, Tika Sumpter and Khandi Alexander
Mo'nique, Queen Latifah, Tika Sumpter and Khandi Alexander
Mo'nique, Queen Latifah, Tika Sumpter and Khandi Alexander

Mo'Nique Claims She Was "Blackballed" By Hollywood After 2010 Oscar Win


Mo'nique

In 2010 Mo'Nique won the Academy Award for best supporting actress for her role in the drama flick 'Precious,' but instead of propelling her career to new heights, the 47-year-old actress has only mad one film since then.

Mo'Nique
Mo'nique with her 2010 best supporting actress Oscar

During a recent interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Mo'Nique explained that she feels her lack of movies roles since winning the Oscar is down to her unwillingness to campaign for the prestigious award before the ceremony took place.

Continue reading: Mo'Nique Claims She Was "Blackballed" By Hollywood After 2010 Oscar Win

Precious: Based On The Novel 'Push' By Sapphire Review


Extraordinary
Beautifully written and directed, this raw and honest drama tells a story that cuts to the core of some extremely serious issues. It also features a terrific cast that adds a breath of fresh air even in the most wrenching scenes.

Claireece Jones (Sidibe), known as Precious, is a troubled 16-year-old pregnant with her second child. Even though she's good at maths, she can't read or write, so she's sent to an alternative school to work with the inventive and caring Ms Rain (Patton). But as she talks with her social worker (Carey), the realities of her life at home with her cruel mother (Mo'Nique) become increasingly worrying. Can this new school offer her a chance to discover something good about herself and maybe begin to head in a positive direction?

Continue reading: Precious: Based On The Novel 'Push' By Sapphire Review

Lee Daniels and Mo'nique - Lee Daniels & Mo'Nique at the Hollywood Palladium Hollywood, USA - The 21st Annual PGA Awards 2010 Sunday 24th January 2010

Lee Daniels and Mo'nique

Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire Trailer


Watch the trailer for Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire

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Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins Review


Very Good
In the growing list of potentially humorous backdrops, the African-American family reunion is rapidly becoming an overused archetype. Everyone from Tyler Perry to Red Grant has utilized the setting for their combination of slapstick and cultural satire. Granted, it gives a filmmaker ample opportunity to splatter a broad spectrum of larger-than-life personalities onto an equally oversized and recognizable canvas, but the tendency toward stereotypes and sentimentality often ruins the insights. At first glance, it appears that the new ensemble comedy Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins will fall into that same clichéd category. But looks, as we all know, can be very deceiving indeed.

Having abandoned his Deep South roots for big city fame, Roscoe Jenkins (Martin Lawrence) is now Dr. R.J. Stevens, TV self help guru, media mogul, and fiancé to supermodel Survivor winner Bianca Kittles (Joy Bryant). When his parents (James Earl Jones and Margaret Avery) announce a family reunion for their 50th wedding anniversary, Roscoe is reluctant to go. Seems he still carries sour memories of life with siblings Otis (Michael Clarke Duncan), Betty (Mo'Nique), and adopted "cousin" Clyde (Cedric the Entertainer). Guilt eventually brings him back home, and after nine long years, things haven't changed much. The same old rivalries exist, his father remains aloof and critical, cousin Reggie (Michael Epps) is a no-good hustler, and high school crush Lucinda (Nicole Ari Parker) is as hot as ever. It will be a trying four days -- if he survives that long.

Continue reading: Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins Review

Mo'nique - Monday 25th June 2007 at Bet Awards Los Angeles, California

Mo'nique

Beerfest Review


Good
Has there been one laugh-out-loud comedy, with the exception of Ricky Bobby, this summer? The excellent Little Miss Sunshine was more of a drama, though Abigail Breslin's pageant finale was hilarious. The Break-Up, with its force feeding of wacky characters, was terrible. Scoop felt too much like a compilation of Woody Allen's not-so greatest hits. Clerks II had its moments, but it lacked the spontaneity and rawness that made the first one so great. Poseidon was funny for all the wrong reasons.

Now enter Beerfest, the newest comedy from the Broken Lizard comedy troupe. It's not nearly as funny as Super Troopers, but it's not nearly as atrocious as the laugh-empty Club Dread. In this dead season of laughs, that makes Beerfest almost a rousing success.

Continue reading: Beerfest Review

Phat Girlz Review


Terrible
In a world of skinny bitches, the aggressively smart-mouthed Jazmin Biltmore is larger than life and pretty damned bitter about it. Stand-up comedian, author, and actress Mo'Nique has made her career out of fat jokes, and she hits that same one note, ad nauseum, in Phat Girlz. Her Jazmin is an aspiring fashion designer riddled with self-loathing, not only because her tablefull of diet pill bottles is doing little to get her down to her idealized size 5, but because she is doomed to unhappiness since, apparently, no one makes sexy clothes for the plus size lady, and without them, how is a woman supposed to trap a man and therefore finally have a shot at happiness?

While you chew on that stunning display of gender politics, Phat Girlz continues to lob out broad slapstick humor - including an honest to God insult-off featuring fat jokes vs. you-so-ugly ones - and utterly one-note cliché characters. The plot, such as it is, finally gets going when Jazmin wins a trip to a posh Palm Springs resort and brings her two best friends, her skinny-bitch cousin Mia (Joyful Drake) and her fellow "sexy succulent," the reserved, schoolmarmish Stacy (Kendra C. Johnson). Jazmin catches the eye of Tunde (Jimmy Jean-Louis), a Nigerian doctor visiting for a medical conference, who likes his women "thick." Despite Jazmin's tendency to rudeness and blatant grilling of him, his intentions, and his beliefs, Tunde pursues her with a single-mindedness only found in romantic comedies.

Continue reading: Phat Girlz Review

The Queens Of Comedy Review


OK
Alongside those Original Kings of Comedy stand their Queens. While you'll have to decide if they're really royalty, these four extremely brazen African-American comediennes have their moments. It's too bad most of their material is oddly cribbed from Chris Rock. Sorry there's not much more to report about this stand-up show, but when there's nothing under the hood, there's nothing to say.

Garfield: The Movie Review


OK

The "Garfield" comic strip hasn't been funny in at least 15 years, but Bill Murray rescues the movie adaptation from the same fate by capturing, in his purringly petulant voice performance, that indolent, impudent charm the fat tabby had in his heyday.

In the movie Garfield is a CGI-rendered creation with those band-shell ears and that wily, persnickety smile that could never be found in a real feline -- and the animation is well integrated into the real world he inhabits, where his unlucky-in-love owner Jon Arbuckle (Brekin Meyer) has just been persuaded by a pretty veterinarian Liz (Jennifer Love Hewitt) to adopt a stray puppy named Odie.

For some reason (probably related to budget) director Peter Hewitt (no relation to Jennifer) chose to make Odie a rather nondescript real dog instead of the giraffe-necked, google-eyed, tongue-wagging dope created by cartoonist Jim Davis. But the pets' relationship remains the same, which is to say Garfield resents Odie for obliviously honing in on his lap time and his turf.

Continue reading: Garfield: The Movie Review

Two Can Play That Game Review


Weak

A movie that preaches dishonesty, trickery and manipulation as the keys to romantic happiness, "Two Can Play That Game" is populated by pathetically shallow "players" of both sexes and very talented actors trapped by their skin color in a tired genre of self-perpetuating stereotypes.

"Two Can Play" is about a successful black ad executive (Vivica A. Fox) who thinks her man, a successful black lawyer (Morris Chestnut), may be running around on her. Her solution for shaping him up (rather than confronting him and having an adult conversation or just leaving to find someone better) is to launch into a 10-day plan that includes breaking up, not returning his calls, making sure he sees her with other men, going to his house, getting him hot, then leaving, and a whole litany of other vindictive head games.

Of course, all of this is meant to be risqué and amusing, but in fact it just makes the movie's heroine look like the kind of shrill, immature, self-centered strumpet whom no man in his right mind would want to be saddled with.

Continue reading: Two Can Play That Game Review

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Mo'nique Movies

Almost Christmas Trailer

Almost Christmas Trailer

It's everyone's favourite time of year, the Christmas holidays when families come together every year...

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Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire Trailer

Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire Trailer

Watch the trailer for Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire Precious is the...

Beerfest Movie Review

Beerfest Movie Review

Has there been one laugh-out-loud comedy, with the exception of Ricky Bobby, this summer? The...

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Phat Girlz Movie Review

Phat Girlz Movie Review

In a world of skinny bitches, the aggressively smart-mouthed Jazmin Biltmore is larger than life...

Garfield: The Movie Movie Review

Garfield: The Movie Movie Review

The "Garfield" comic strip hasn't been funny in at least 15 years, but Bill Murray...

Two Can Play That Game Movie Review

Two Can Play That Game Movie Review

A movie that preaches dishonesty, trickery and manipulation as the keys to romantic happiness, "Two...

Soul Plane Movie Review

Soul Plane Movie Review

It may be crude, it may be lewd, it's certainly slapdash and stupid, but the...

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