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The Legend Of Longwood Trailer


The Miller family have just moved to Ireland from New York and for young Mickey Miller the Irish countryside is far from the life she's even known. Her mother has inherited a small cottage and the family are set to move in. Adjusting to country life isn't easy for Mickey but she finds a local friend he's quick to tell her about the ancient mysteries of her new home.

The biggest mystery is about the tale of The Black Knight, once Mickey learns about the castle the knight used to live in, it doesn't take her long to go and explore. The house is now inhabited by Lady Thyrza and she tells the story of the knight and his daughter. When an accidental fire broke out in the castle, 7 children died, the very next day 7 white horses appeared on the property and have never left.

Feeling a close affinity to the horses, Mickey feels like she might be able to uncover some of the past mysteries and give a little solace to the lost souls of Longwood. Mickey might be young but destiny awaits.

Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga'Hoole Review


Excellent
Spectacular animation and a terrific voice cast go a long way to making this soaring adventure feel much more original than it is. Despite heavy echoes of other movies, it's thoroughly engaging and often genuinely thrilling.

Soren (voiced by Sturgess) is an idealistic owlet who dreams of one day meeting his heroes, the mythical Guardians of Ga'Hoole. Then he and his brother Kludd (Kwanten) are kidnapped by the evil Pure Ones, led by Queen Nyra (Mirren) and Metalbeak (Edgerton), as slaves for their nefarious plan. In their wasteland hideout, Soren meets the feisty dwarf owl Gylfie (Barclay), and they flee to Ga'Hoole for help. There, Soren meets the quirky Ezylryb (Rush), who helps teach him to fly properly and punctures some of his heroic ideals before they head into battle.

Continue reading: Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga'Hoole Review

Miriam Margolyes, Harry Potter and Empire Leicester Square Tuesday 7th July 2009 World Premiere of Harry Potter And The Half Blood Prince at the Empire Leicester Square cinema - arrivals London, England

Miriam Margolyes, Harry Potter and Empire Leicester Square
Miriam Margolyes, Harry Potter and Empire Leicester Square

Miriam Margolyes Thursday 17th January 2008 Opening Night of the Broadway Play 'November' at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre New York City, USA

Miriam Margolyes

Miriam Margolyes Thursday 13th December 2007 Premiere of 'Billy Elliott the Musical' at the Capitol Theatre - Arrivals Sydney, Australia

Miriam Margolyes

Sunshine (2000) Review


Excellent
Now that the 20th century is finally over, I guess it's time to start re-interpreting it. Hopefully, summarizers of the century will follow the example of Hungarian director Istvan Svabo and honestly face the truth, no matter how painful. (Unfortunately, many intellectuals don't always seem interested in the truth --- especially about subjects like communism, which many continue to embrace.)

In Sunshine, Svabo looks back through the last 100 years of his country's history for meaning, and finds some --- enough to fill a three-hour, soapy epic about the century's chaos. The film mostly works, and is a worthy addition to Svabo's art.

Continue reading: Sunshine (2000) Review

Cold Comfort Farm Review


Excellent
Clever and funny English country dramady about an orphan (Beckinsale, in a radiant debut that has gone downhill ever since), who is sent to live with her insane relatives on Cold Comfort Farm. Grows better with each viewing.

James And The Giant Peach Review


Very Good
Lemme tell ya, this was the most unusual screening I've been to in a long time. After all, what better way to spend a Saturday morning than with 200 hyperactive children, all of whom are fawning over a guy dressed up in a giant, fuzzy, grey bat suit, complete with six-foot wingspan? (Note: as far as I can tell, the bat had nothing to do with the film.) And lemme tell ya, none of this was as strange as the film I was about to see....

Now I'm probably the last person in the world who ought to judge what makes for a good children's movie, but if you'd asked me that yesterday, I certainly wouldn't have said James and the Giant Peach. This is a story about a young boy, James (Paul Terry), whose parents are eaten by a spiritual rhinoceros. He is adopted by his cruel aunts (Miriam Margolyes and AbFab's Joanna Lumley), who abuse him cruelly. Then an "old man" (Pete Postlethwaite) gives James some "alligator tongues" which he spills on a peach tree, creating the aforementioned giant peach. Inside this peach, where James hides to get away from his aunties, he finds a bunch of giant bugs: a Brooklyn centipede (Richard Dreyfuss), a cowardly earthworm (which is, by the way, not a bug--David Thewlis), a sultry spider (Susan Sarandon), a matronly ladybug (Jane Leeves), and sundry other insects.

Continue reading: James And The Giant Peach Review

Being Julia Review


Very Good
When you have a performance as fresh and audacious as this one from a movie star who doesn't average a film a year, it makes you wonder why we see so little of her. But here she is, Annette Bening (Open Range, The Grifters), wowing us with her patented delicious verve in the form of stage naughtiness -- a portrayal that should go on more than one Best Actress list for the year 2004.

As the great Julia Lambert, the toast of the London stage in the early '30s, she's struck by a premonition of fading vitality at the grand age of forty. Worries of it bring her close to a breakdown as she begins to desperately search for other stimuli to give her life meaning. She carries on a dialogue with her muse, Jimmy Langton (Michael Gambon), her dead drama coach that she summons up as an imagined presence to tell her when she's going well or going astray.

Continue reading: Being Julia Review

Sunshine Review


Excellent
Now that the 20th century is finally over, I guess it's time to start re-interpreting it. Hopefully, summarizers of the century will follow the example of Hungarian director Istvan Svabo and honestly face the truth, no matter how painful. (Unfortunately, many intellectuals don't always seem interested in the truth --- especially about subjects like communism, which many continue to embrace.)

In Sunshine, Svabo looks back through the last 100 years of his country's history for meaning, and finds some --- enough to fill a three-hour, soapy epic about the century's chaos. The film mostly works, and is a worthy addition to Svabo's art.

Continue reading: Sunshine Review

Babe Review


Excellent
Baa ram ewe. The already-classic kiddie flick wins raves for its groundbreaking animation and a theme that is both child-accessible while not insulting to adults. Plus, that little pig is so darn cute.

The Life And Death Of Peter Sellers Review


Very Good
Discussion topic: Which of the following people can accurately be described as "comic geniuses"? Woody Allen. Adam Sandler. Groucho Marx. Gilda Radner.

You're unlikely to get consensus on such a phrase, except for one: Peter Sellers. Everybody knows he was a genius, right?

Continue reading: The Life And Death Of Peter Sellers Review

Ladies In Lavender Review


OK
Hear about a movie starring Maggie Smith and Judi Dench, and it's pretty obvious what you're going to get, and it's not going to be car chases and bank heists. Two of the grandest dames of the screen star in Ladies in Lavender, a scenic, charming, and quaint tale set in the 1930s. It's the kind of movie many English filmmakers specialize in.

Sisters Janet (Smith) and Ursula (Dench) Widdington live a quiet and active life in their spacious seaside house in Cornwall when a young man washes up on shore. The sisters take him in as a boarder and immediately take a liking to Andrea (Daniel Brühl), a Polish violin maestro who can't speak a word of English. The sisters soon grow close to Andrea, with Janet acting like a concerned mother, while the never married Ursula quietly falls in love with the hunky Andrea.

Continue reading: Ladies In Lavender Review

Different For Girls Review


Bad
Lifeless cross-dressing movie. Not funny. Not interesting. Stay away.

End Of Days Review


Zero

By 10 minutes into "End of Days," this sorry Schwarzenegger-versus-Satan saga -- full of gratuitous gore-and-guns and contorted Christian mythology -- has already proved itself to be the most laughable entry yet in the recently fashionable, faith-based supernatural thriller genre.

The very first scene in "Days" is an unintentional riot as director Peter Hyams opens the film at the Vatican and manages, through exactly the wrong mix of menacing lighting and whispery Italian accents, to make the pontiff and his closest cardinals come across like Pope Don Corleone and bunch of mock-Scorsese mobsters.

It's 1979 and they've got their tunics in a twist because a comet is passing over the moon, signaling the birth of a girl who will become the object of Satan's lust on New Year's Eve 1999. If he manages to impregnate her, the armies of darkness will rule the world for 1,000 years, or something like that.

Continue reading: End Of Days Review

Sunshine Review


OK

"Sunshine" is a complex, cross-generational saga about the social, romantic and soul-searching struggles of a proud Jewish family in early 20th Century Hungary. It's a three-hour epic that spans several decades, and while that's a long time to sit still for what is essentially dramatized genealogy, the movie's only unequivocal fault is that it is -- believe it or not -- far too short.

A labor of love from director Istvan Szabo ("Mephisto") -- who co-wrote the film with playwright Israel Horovitz and based it, in part, on episodes in his family history -- this is an intense and personal film with beauty and scope to spare. But with nearly a century of territory to cover and more than a dozen primary characters to enfold, even at 180 minutes, it feels rushed -- like the cinematic equivalent of Cliffs Notes for a great novel.

To give the audience something constant to hang on to throughout the picture, Szabo cast Ralph Fiennes to play three generations of men in the Sonnenschein family, a clan whose fortune comes from an heirloom recipe for tasty, healing herbal tonic known as A Taste of Sunshine -- turned into a popular drink in the late 19th Century by the Sonnenschein patriarch.

Continue reading: Sunshine Review

Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban Review


Very Good

Harry Potter is growing up, and so is his movie franchise.Under the tutelage of a new director -- Alfonso Cuarón, known for both children's fare (the 1995 remake of "A Little Princess") and an edgy, insightfully soulful, sex-charged teen road-trip flick ("Y Tu Mama, Tambien") -- the boy wizard has graduated from the world of kiddie movie spectacles with tie-in toys.

"Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" is a film in which depth of character, cunning humor and hair-raising chills come shining through the visual blitzkrieg of special effects -- which are also magnificently improved over the series first two installments. Case in point: a half-horse, half-eagle creature called a Hippogriff that gives "Lord of the Rings'" Gollum a run for his money as the most life-like CGI creation in cinema history.

Beyond just its detailed feathers (which fluff when it shakes) or its golden eyes (which bore holes in the screen with obstinate personality), this winged equine's every movement, from its canter to its peck, is a studied yet natural, amazingly fluid amalgam of the two beasts that were combined to create it.

Continue reading: Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban Review

Chasing Liberty Review


OK

Evolving post-pop-princess Mandy Moore has shown real talent in the three movies she's headlined since becoming an actress. But she has yet to make anything worth watching -- except possibly to those who fall into her own demographic of teenage girls who haven't enough movie-going experience to recognize trite when they see it.

In "Chasing Liberty," she plays Anna Foster, the 18-year-old First Daughter of the United States who is yearning to breathe free of her Secret Service contingent, mainly so boys she likes don't get scared off.

Director Andy Cadiff -- a former TV-sitcom producer, so you know originality isn't his bag -- announces his intention to do nothing creative in the course of the movie by opening with the most inevitable cliché of innocuous teen comedy: the what-to-wear musical montage. Moore, who would be drop-dead gorgeous in a burlap sack, goes through about 20 outfits in preparation for a date with a cute, nervous boy who arrives at the White House in a convertible and passes through the gates before his ID is checked.

Continue reading: Chasing Liberty Review

Miriam Margolyes

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Miriam Margolyes Movies

The Man Who Invented Christmas Movie Review

The Man Who Invented Christmas Movie Review

There's a somewhat contrived jauntiness to this blending of fact and fiction that may leave...

The Man Who Invented Christmas Trailer

The Man Who Invented Christmas Trailer

Charles Dickens might be one of the most legendary authors in history, but it wasn't...

The Guilt Trip Movie Review

The Guilt Trip Movie Review

Virtually impossible to market, this film isn't nearly as wacky and rude as its cast...

The Guilt Trip Trailer

The Guilt Trip Trailer

Andy Brewster is an inventor who is determined to sell his brand new product by...

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole Movie Review

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole Movie Review

Spectacular animation and a terrific voice cast go a long way to making this soaring...

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole Trailer

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole Trailer

The Guardians of Ga'Hoole are sworn to protect the innocent from trouble and vanquish evil....

James and the Giant Peach Movie Review

James and the Giant Peach Movie Review

Lemme tell ya, this was the most unusual screening I've been to in a long...

Being Julia Movie Review

Being Julia Movie Review

When you have a performance as fresh and audacious as this one from a movie...

Sunshine Movie Review

Sunshine Movie Review

Now that the 20th century is finally over, I guess it's time to start re-interpreting...

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Movie Review

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Movie Review

Welcome back, Potter.The beloved Harry Potter returns to screens, a scant year after his most...

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