Miranda Richardson Page 3

Miranda Richardson

Miranda Richardson Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

A Week In Movies: Celebrities Turn Out To Collect Awards In Los Angeles And London, Mortdecai Has Three Premieres And New Trailers For Hopkins And Hawke


Julianne Moore Angelina Jolie Jessica Chastain Timothy Spall Miranda Richardson Johnny Depp Ryan Gosling Russell Crowe Jesse Eisenberg

Critics' Choice Movie Awards Julianne Moore

A-list celebrities turned out in Hollywood for the starry Critics' Choice Movie Awards last weekend, including Julianne Moore, Angelina Jolie, Jessica Chastain, Eddie Redmayne, Keira Knightley, Ethan Hawke, Rosamund Pike, Michael Keaton, Reese Witherspoon, Marion Cotillard, David Oyelowo, Felicity Jones, Jennifer Aniston, Amy Adams and Chris Hemsworth. Jared Leto even matched his outfit to the blue carpet.

Photos - 20th Annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards held at the Hollywood Palladium - Part 1

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Celebrities Turn Out To Collect Awards In Los Angeles And London, Mortdecai Has Three Premieres And New Trailers For Hopkins And Hawke

Nepotism Alert! More Of Angelina Jolie's Brood Cast In Maleficent


Angelina Jolie Elle Fanning Juno Temple Miranda Richardson Sam Riley

It looks as though the news that Angelina Jolie’s daughter Vivienne will be appearing in Maleficent may have caused a touch of sibling rivalry in the Pitt-Jolie household. Today (October 23, 2012), US Weekly have revealed that another two members of Angelina’s sprawling brood have signed up for roles in the movie, which focuses on Sleeping Beauty’s evil nemesis.

Back in August, it was reported that four year-old Vivienne Jolie-Pitt had landed the role of the child version of Aurora, the Princess. The grown up Aurora will be played by Elle Fanning. Now, it’s been revealed that Pax – aged eight – and Zahara – aged seven – will also be appearing in the live-action movie, alongside their little sister and their mum. Disney haven’t actually commented on the news but a source told US Weekly that Pax and Zahara have “smaller parts” than Vivienne and apparently won’t have speaking roles. If you’re wondering why Shiloh, Maddox and Knox have been left out of the action, then you should probably know that Shiloh was offered a part as well but “she was bored and not in the mood during the day her part was supposed to happen so she ended up not being in the film.” Kids, eh?

Continue reading: Nepotism Alert! More Of Angelina Jolie's Brood Cast In Maleficent

Grayson Perry and Miranda Richardson - Justin De Villeneuve, Grayson Perry, Miranda Richardson Thursday 24th May 2012 Pandamonium 2012 at The Look Out Educational Centre in Hyde Park

Grayson Perry and Miranda Richardson
Grayson Perry and Ben Fogle
Grayson Perry and Ben Fogle
Grayson Perry and Miranda Richardson

Miranda Richardson and Odeon Leicester Square Sunday 8th January 2012 War Horse - UK film premiere held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals. London, England

Miranda Richardson and Odeon Leicester Square
Miranda Richardson and Odeon Leicester Square
Miranda Richardson and Odeon Leicester Square
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson

Turtle: The Incredible Journey Trailer


A loggerhead turtle is born on a beach in Florida and starts on a journey that her ancestors have been taking for 200 million years. Only 1 in 10,000 turtles survive this journey that takes 25 years to complete.

Continue: Turtle: The Incredible Journey Trailer

Miranda Richardson Tuesday 14th June 2011 'Born To Be Wild 3D' BFI IMAX - UK film premiere 'Born To Be Wild 3D' BFI IMAX

Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Guest and Miranda Richardson
Guest and Miranda Richardson

Lisa Maxwell, Angela Griffin, Denise Van Outen, Douglas Booth, Elizabeth McGovern, Ellie Goulding, Frank Skinner, Harry Hill, Jennifer Saunders, Judi Dench, Louie Spence, Mick Hucknall, Miranda Richardson, Nigel Harman, Nigel Lindsay, Ronnie Wood, Rupert Penry-Jones, Sarah Harding, Sarah Parish and Stephen Graham Tuesday 14th June 2011 Shrek The Musical - press night held at Theatre Royal, Drury Lane - arrivals. London, England

Lisa Maxwell, Angela Griffin, Denise Van Outen, Douglas Booth, Elizabeth Mcgovern, Ellie Goulding, Frank Skinner, Harry Hill, Jennifer Saunders, Judi Dench, Louie Spence, Mick Hucknall, Miranda Richardson, Nigel Harman, Nigel Lindsay, Ronnie Wood, Rupert Penry-jones, Sarah Harding, Sarah Parish and Stephen Graham
Lisa Maxwell

Miranda Richardson and Palladium - Friday 18th February 2011 at London Fashion Week London, England

Miranda Richardson and Palladium
Miranda Richardson and Palladium

Miranda Richardson - Sunday 13th February 2011 at BAFTA London, England

Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson

Miranda Richardson and Sony - Sunday 14th November 2010 at Tribeca Grand Hotel New York City, USA

Miranda Richardson and Sony
Miranda Richardson and Sony

Made In Dagenham Review


Excellent
This engaging, warm British comedy-drama not only features extremely vivid characters but also traces the real events that led to the law requiring equal pay for women. And it's also a lot of fun.

In 1968, Rita (Hawkins) works in the Ford plant in Dagenham. She quickly rises to a leadership role on the shopfloor where 187 women work on upholstery. But they earn a fraction of their male counterparts' wages, and their jobs are being reclassified as "unskilled". So Rita and her colleagues (including James, Winstone and Riseborough) team up with their union rep (Hoskins) to demand equality from the Ford execs (including Graves and Schiff). But their strike action has repercussions, catching the attention of government minister Barbara Castle (Richardson).

Continue reading: Made In Dagenham Review

Miranda Richardson Monday 27th September 2010 Metropolitan Opera Season, opening with new production of 'Das Rheingold' at the Metropolitan Opera House in the Lincoln Center New York City, USA

Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson

Miranda Richardson - Monday 20th September 2010 at Odeon Leicester Square Made In Dagenham - UK film premiere held at the Odeon Leicester Square. London, England

Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson

Miranda Richardson, Jennifer Saunders and Tracey Emin - Miranda Richardson, Jennifer Saunders and Tracey Emin Saturday 18th September 2010 at London Fashion Week London Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2011 - Betty Jackson

Miranda Richardson, Jennifer Saunders and Tracey Emin
Miranda Richardson

Miranda Richardson Tuesday 1st June 2010 Givenchy celebrates the closing of Marina Abramovic's 'The Artist is Present' at The Museum of Modern Art - Arrivals New York City, USA

Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson

Made In Dagenham Trailer


In 1960's England, there wasn't such a thing as womens rights in the workplace, for the most part they were treated as an underclass. Working for less pay was just one of the pitfalls of working as a woman.

Continue: Made In Dagenham Trailer

Miranda Richardson Friday 22nd May 2009 rings out the bells at St. Paul's Cathedral for the international day of biodiversity in support of the MEMO project. The MEMO project will persuade the authorities in capital cities all over the world to participate in the tolling of bells for this most global of issues. London, England

Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson

Miranda Richardson Thursday 26th March 2009 Opening night after party for the Broadway play 'Exit The King' at the Barrymore Theatre - Arrivals New York City, USA

Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson

Miranda Richardson and Odeon Leicester Square Tuesday 3rd March 2009 'The Young Victoria' - UK film premiere held at Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals London, England

Miranda Richardson and Odeon Leicester Square
Miranda Richardson and Odeon Leicester Square
Miranda Richardson and Odeon Leicester Square
Miranda Richardson, Odeon Leicester Square and The Young Vic
Miranda Richardson, Odeon Leicester Square and The Young Vic
Miranda Richardson, Odeon Leicester Square and The Young Vic

Miranda Richardson, ANDREW SACHS and June Whitfield - Miranda Richardson, Andrew Sachs and June Whitfield London, England - The Orion Author part held at the Victoria & Albert Museum Wednesday 18th February 2009

Miranda Richardson, Andrew Sachs and June Whitfield
Miranda Richardson, Andrew Sachs and June Whitfield

Fred Claus Trailer


Fred Claus trailer

Continue: Fred Claus Trailer

Southland Tales Review


Extraordinary
At its Cannes 2006 inception, Richard Kelly's Southland Tales was plagued with walkouts that, reportedly, rang close to triple digits. The follow-up to Kelly's post-millennial, Reagan-era-set cult hit Donnie Darko, Tales seems destined for the same cult bin: a film maudit with a cast best suited for the WB or for the next slate of romantic comedies to hit the multiplex. If Darko was post-9/11, Southland is post-Republican justification. It makes sense that they would end up in roughly the same nebula.

A terrorist group has just set off a bomb in Texas that, while killing hundreds, has also created a parallel universe unbeknownst to the general population. Not too long after, the Republicans have an eye on everything, the Democrats have turned into militant twits under the banner of Karl Marx, and action superstar Boxer Santaros (Dwayne "The Rock Johnson) has gone missing. Though his wife (a brilliantly bitchy Mandy Moore) is the daughter of prez-to-be Bobby Frost (Holmes Osborne), Santaros appears in plain sight with his current flame, porn diva Krysta Now (Sarah Michelle Gellar). It's to Kelly's credit that almost every shot of them together is framed to look like it was taken by the paparazzi.

Continue reading: Southland Tales Review

Paris, Je T'aime Review


Good
One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the world besides Paris that could have inspired a film as varied in the types of cinematic pleasure so ably delivered by the anthology piece Paris Je T'Aime -- but it seems unlikely. This isn't due to an unavailability of good stories or locations in many other great metropolises, but more because being able to dangle the possibility of shooting in Paris in front of the world's greatest directors is going to be so much more enticing. Also, there are few other cities besides Paris that come with such a powerful and multifarious wealth of preassociated images and emotions for both filmmaker and audience to both draw upon and react against. So what could have been a collection of short films with a few highs, several lows, and a lot of muddled in-betweens is in fact a remarkably and consistently imaginative body of work, practically giddy with energy, that only rarely touches the ground.

Project overseers Emmanuel Benbihy and Tristan Carné wanted to create a cinematic map of Paris, with each short film representing one of the city's 20 arrondissements (neighborhoods). They ended up with 18 films, none of them more than a few minutes long and directed by a glittering, international roster of filmmakers. While none of the films here are anything approaching masterpieces, hardly a one is in any way a chore to sit through, which has to be some sort of an accomplishment.

Continue reading: Paris, Je T'aime Review

Wah-Wah Review


OK
The obvious risk with autobiographical films is that audiences just might not in the end be interested in the same sort of story that the filmmaker wants to tell about himself. So it is with Wah-Wah, written and directed by Richard E. Grant, who based it on his own childhood growing up in Swaziland in the years leading up to the end of British rule - Grant might want to focus most on the film's dysfunctional (though fun in its own way) family and its effect on his young stand-in, but viewers may be left wondering what's going on outside that melodrama. It's a big world out there, and Grant only gives us teasing glances at it.

The boy at the center of everything is Ralph Compton, 11 years old in the film's preamble, in which he watches (once literally, from the back seat) as his mother Lauren (Miranda Richardson) screws a married man and then takes off with him. The divorce proves ugly and Ralph is sent off to boarding school, leaving his devastated father Harry (Gabriel Byrne) behind, fending off the occasional advance from local females. The film starts properly three years later with the return home of Ralph, this time played by Nicholas Hoult, sprouted quite a bit from his About a Boy days. Ralph comes back to find Harry just remarried, this time to an American stewardess he's known for six weeks, Ruby (Emily Watson). She's a breath of warm air, waltzing right into this snobbish little colonial backwater and immediately breaks practically every one of their thousand little etiquettes - night and day to the waspish, scathing Lauren. But yet it's not enough to keep Harry from hitting the bottle hard. Harry drinks, Ruby frets, Ralph fumes, and occasionally Lauren returns just to stir things up to an even higher pitch.

Continue reading: Wah-Wah Review

Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire Review


Excellent

For the uninitiated, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was the book where author J.K. Rowling finally went off her rocker, turning out a 734-page monster of a book (vs. 309 pages for #1) that made everyone wonder if any child could possibly have that kind of attention span.

Turns out they did: Book four is also where Rowling went from Big Hit to Mega Worldwide Sensation, and the Harry Potter series became a cultural touchstone. (This is also about the time that ultra-right wing groups started denouncing the series as demonic.)

And so, everything that is past is prologue: The first three films now feel like nothing more than window dressing for this one, a rich movie with expert plotting, clever humor, and a sophistication lacking in the earlier pictures. At the same time, it's fine for (older) kids, who'll root for Harry and Co. through his many scrapes in this edition.

Goblet of Fire finds Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) back for his fourth year at Hogwarts Academy. Things are getting heavier for the lad: He's having vivid dreams about Lord Voldemort being revived in the flesh. On top of that, the school is hosting the legendary Tri-Wizard Tournament, in which three aspiring magicians will compete to win a fancy blue cup (plus bragging rights), which brings two foreign schools -- one a collection of brutish Russian guys, another a group of breathless French fairy queens -- into Hogwarts for the term. While the tournament is meant for older kids, naturally the undersized Potter will find his way into the mix. On top of that, Harry's got some raging hormones, which has him swooning for fellow student Cho (Katie Leung), while Ron (Rupert Grint) tries in vain to suppress his budding love for Hermione (Emma Watson). This comes to a head of sorts during a formal dance, one of the film's most memorable scenes. And all the while, Voldemort inches closer to Harry.

Overall, the story is obviously and dramatically pared down from the book. Even I, a non-reader, could tell that there were huge gaps in the plot. Strangely, it doesn't really matter. All but the bare essentials have been stripped away, and even though it tops 2 1/2 hours, Goblet is a lean, mean, storytelling machine. There's rarely a dull moment (a stark contrast to some of the overblown earlier installments in the series), and it's amazingly easy to follow the serpentine plot. Partly this is because we've had three movies to get up to speed on the myriad characters of Potter, and even though Goblet introduces a good number of new faces, keeping track of them is a snap. The downside of this is that, aside from a little romance for the main three characters, there's not much time to develop our heroes further. But really, it isn't needed. They're fleshy enough as it is, and the film does give them a bit more structure to set up #5.

Speculation has been rampant about how director Mike Newell -- of Four Weddings and a Funeral fame -- would work out as the helmer of an action-oriented kid flick. Turns out, he's better than those who came before him. Not only does Newell have a good handle over the film's action showpieces, he knows how to deal with awkward romances and growing pains of the teen years. Maybe it's because he's the first British director to try his hand at this very British series?

Speaking of the action: The special effects in this installment are hands-down better than ever. There's probably not a single scene in Goblet of Fire that isn't manipulated with CGI in some way -- but you'll never notice. The effects are so good and so seamless that you seriously can't tell the difference (reality-wise) between Radcliffe and the giant, fire-breathing dragon staring him down.

And speaking of dragons: The film is scary, more so than the other three. As a case in point, the woman sitting in front of me, with two kids aged about six to eight, had to leave the theater after the first two minutes because the little ones were so frightened.

Altogether the film is just about right for what a Harry Potter movie ought to be. The story is consistently interesting but not too confusing, the dialogue is spot-on, and the film blends action and quiet moments perfectly. (Frankly, the film should win an Oscar for editing.)

But overall Goblet of Fire has succeeded in doing one big thing that the first three movies completely failed at: For the first time, I'm actually looking forward to the next in the series.

A little magic ought to fix that arm right up, no?

The Prince & Me Review


Bad
Fun fact about Julia Stiles, teen movie vet: She isn't much good in teen movies. She hit the right notes in 10 Things I Hate About You, playing a caustic outsider, but since then she's struggled to fit in with the Freddie Prinze/Selma Blair crowd. So long, in fact, that it's since become the Lindsay Lohan/Hilary Duff crowd (even if, in terms of youth-market trends, "so long" actually means about twelve hours).

Try as she might, Stiles doesn't fit comfortably within the framework. Her slightly deep voice has an intelligence to it that physically undermines her attempts to slum. Yet she persists. Unfortunately, I fear the onslaught of Down to You, Save the Last Dance, and now The Prince & Me has left Stiles a little stunted and worse for wear. She's spent so much time in the teen ghetto that even when she emerges in an allegedly grown-up movie like Mona Lisa Smile, something feels off. An aura of routine hangs in the air, and other actresses upstage her. Stiles may, in real life, resemble her character in The Prince & Me: smart, down-to-earth and good-humored. It's a tribute to the thinness of her starring roles that she still manages to come off awkward, even fake.

Continue reading: The Prince & Me Review

Kansas City Review


Weak
Every time Robert Altman makes a movie, it becomes the thing to do for the Hollywood acting community. It happened with The Player. It happened with Short Cuts. It happened with Ready to Wear. And it happened with Kansas City.

The only problem is that The Player was the last of his films that was really all that great. While Kansas City marks a slight improvement over Ready to Wear, that ain't saying much because, after all, so does Showgirls.

Continue reading: Kansas City Review

The Big Brass Ring Review


Good
Extremely convoluted and complex political thriller, made only because Orson Welles was in the process of making it (and starring from his own script) when he died in 1985. The political melodrama was intended as a "bookend" to Citizen Kane, but this ain't no Rosebud.

The Crying Game Review


Good
Years ago on David Spade's "Hollywood Minute" segment on Saturday Night Live, the comedian offered his take on The Crying Game's big secret. "Sssh," he said. "It's overrated." Sarcasm aside, I have to agree with Spade.

Is it a good secret? Sure. Is it one of the most memorable in cinema's last 15 years? Possibly. But one good surprise/twist does not make a great movie, and there's very little else in director/writer Neil Jordan's drama to deserve such lavish wide-eyed acclaim. It's a solid, well-acted character study. That's it, I'm afraid.

Continue reading: The Crying Game Review

The Rage In Placid Lake Review


Excellent
Placid Lake (Ben Lee) is a (regrettably named) young man who has just graduated from preparatory school and thoroughly embarrassed his self-seeking hippie parents, Doug (Garry McDonald) and Sylvia Lake (Miranda Richardson), his tyrannical classmates and hypocritical teachers. Convinced that he can only find himself in the wilds of Montana (he lives in Australia), Placid makes a schmaltzy student film (Life is Super Dooper) about the awe-inspiring atmosphere of friendliness at his school and it nets him a coveted $10,000 prize check. With the money, he can now leave the small world he's always known and venture to exciting, foreign locales. Unfortunately, there is a rage inside Placid Lake - a rage that compels him to recreate his award winning film for its debut screening. The Life is Super Dooper shown at the awards ceremony is a B&W expose consisting of hidden camera footage of classmates beating each other up, teachers cursing about their charges, and Placid's parent's internal strife over his mother's lesbian affair. The audience is shocked, and Placid winds up flying off the roof of the school. Lying in a full body cast for months, Placid emerges with a plan for the ultimate act of rebellion: being normal.

The Rage in Placid Lake is writer/director Tony McNamara's debut film and it's both a wildly entertaining and heartfelt film. McNamara comes from a theatre background and we hear it in the clever and witty dialogue. While the film is not fast paced, it moves along congenially and never pauses long enough to become bogged down in the sentimentality that smoothes out its rougher edges -- it's a poignant film with a young, brash attitude.

Continue reading: The Rage In Placid Lake Review

The Designated Mourner Review


OK
Is Wallace Shawn a genius? I won't try to deny it. The diminuitive actor and prolific writer has some amazing insight on life, and in this film, an adaptation of his stage play, three characters sit at a table and talk to the camera (and, rarely, to one another) about those insights. Think Spalding Gray, times three, but without the humor. A lack of humor is what gets this Mourner into trouble early on. While the commentary is biting, the setting (a futuristic totalitarian state out of The Handmaid's Tale) feels unfinished and false, and much of the chit-chat revolves around the death of individuality due to the new regime, not due to any real character development. As a result, Mourner is a tough nut to crack and requires your utmost attention to the smallest nuances of speech. Nichols is astounding. The other players are less so. The film on the whole feels overwhelmingly pretentious, but it certainly has its moments.

St. Ives Review


Good
Take one Merchant-Ivory flick and stir in about 20 pounds of marshmallow crème -- and you've got St. Ives.

Pronounced "sahn TEEVE," the film is based on a Robert Louis Stevenson tale about a Napoleonic Era French captain named Jacques St. Ives (Jean-Marc Barr) who is captured by the British during the war, sent to P.O.W. camp in Scotland, and falls in love along the way, of course. The object of his affection is a local girl (the forgettable Anna Friel), who lives under the protection of her mother (Miranda Richardson), a woman who is having a dalliance with the stiff prison camp boss (Richard E. Grant), who is oddly enough receiving lessons in the ways of love from our very own, very Frahnch St. Ives.

Continue reading: St. Ives Review

The Evening Star Review


Weak
What could be more foul than having your ashes spread over the beach of the horribly polluted Gulf of Mexico? Well, maybe having to sit through The Evening Star, the long-awaited tearjerky sequel to Terms of Endearment.

The Evening Star picks up in 1988, and follows 8 more years of the further adventures of Aurora Greenwood's (Shirley MacLaine) über-dysfunctional extended family. Now, Emma's (Debra Winger in Terms) kids have grown up under Aurora's eye, and the jury's still out on how well she did. Their Aunt Patsy (Miranda Richardson) is now a wealthy divorcee who is constantly one-upping Aurora. The caustic Aurora finds brief happiness in the arms of a younger man (Bill Paxton). Rosie (Marion Ross) is still in Aurora's kitchen, and a whole horde of minor players weave in and out of the action, mainly serving to dredge up the past and to breathe some new life into the Endearment franchise.

Continue reading: The Evening Star Review

Tom & Viv Review


OK
Notable mainly because two of its stars were nominated for 1994 acting Oscars, Miranda Richardson and Rosemary Harris, Tom & Viv is 1994's biopic about the life and times of T. S. Eliot (Willem Dafoe) and his wife, Viv (Richardson). Richardson's performance as the poet's ill wife who slowly loses her mind thanks to turn-of-the-century drugs is fine: the best of the five nominees for Best Actress in my opinion. Harris plays Viv's mother, and she has about 12 dull lines. Plotwise, this self-absorbed tale goes nowhere after the first 15 minutes. Interesting is Richardson's character interpretation, but nothing more.

Sleepy Hollow Review


Good
I'll be the first to admit I don't really remember the details of Washington Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. But what I do remember, well, it didn't go like this.

In typical Tim Burton fashion, a fairy tale gets an update (and the film's color gets drained out in the process). The guts of Legend are still there: In 1799, evil headless horseman marauds a tiny village in upstate New York. Ichabod Crane (Depp) is sent to investigate.

Continue reading: Sleepy Hollow Review

Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom Of The Opera Review


Terrible

Andrew Lloyd Webber's musicals are garish, puerile melodramas with all the elegance and sincerity of a Super Bowl halftime show -- and his brash, brassy songs have the depth and nuance of action-movie explosions.

Director Joel Schumacher was responsible for one of the most tawdry, terribly cliché-riddled action-movie bombs in Hollywood history -- 1997's "Batman and Robin."

When this pair teamed up to bring Webber's "The Phantom of the Opera" to the big screen, it was a match made in hell.

Continue reading: Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom Of The Opera Review

Chicken Run Review


OK

It's always a pleasure to see an animated movie that eschews the trappings of shopworn formulas kiddie flicks, and the capriciously clever, clay-rendered "Chicken Run" is nothing if not unique.

A goof on "The Great Escape" and "Stalag 17," but set in a chicken coop kept by a tyrannical, hairpinned harpy of a farmer's wife, the picture serves up an charming self-confidence fable, refreshingly short on stock cartoony characters (no orphans or cutesy simian sidekicks) and long on the distinctive, malleable, stop-motion genius of its director, Wallace and Gromit creator Nick Park.

Park worked hand-in-hand with Peter Lord, best known for Peter Gabriel's "Sledgehammer" video, but the film's winning visual style is unmistakably Park's. Every character is remarkably alive with verve and personality, thanks largely to his trademarks: Ridiculously wide mouths with abbreviated rows of teeth, remarkably expressive, oversized eyeballs, ledge-like foreheads and the tendency for all his characters to walk with a little waddle.

Continue reading: Chicken Run Review

Sleepy Hollow Review


OK

Who better to revamp Washington Irving's classic spook tale of the Headless Horseman than Tim Burton, the modern maestro of movie macabre?

A little tweaking here (a conspiracy plot), a little re-writing there (Ichabod Crane is now a nervous police detective instead of a nervous school teacher) and -- ta-da! -- it's "Sleepy Hollow," a sumptuously stylized, oddly traditional, darkly comical, and unmistakably Burton-esque take on this uniquely American fairy tale.

Taking place in 1799, this inventive reinterpretation of "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" -- written by "Fight Club" scripter Andrew Kevin Walker and polished by "Shakespeare In Love" scribe Tom Stoppard -- features Johnny Depp as Ichabod Crane, an ungainly, outcast, New York City constable come to the upstate hamlet of Sleepy Hollow to investigate a spate of beheadings that local legend has pinned on the noggin-less ghost of mad a Revolutionary War mercenary.

Continue reading: Sleepy Hollow Review

Spider Review


Good

David Cronenberg's "Spider" is a mesmerizing immersion into the precariously unstable mind of a psychiatric patient who has just been released after 20 years in an asylum.

Living in an orderly but cavernous and colorlessly dreary halfway house in the empty industrial corner of London where he grew up, the haggard, misshapen man in his 30s begins a journey -- into his past and deep into his own mind -- that threatens the tenuous grip on reality that earned him his provisional freedom.

The director's preternatural talent for uncanny atmospherics permeates the film from its very first frames -- the opening credits run over Rorschach-test-like images of the peeling paint on the halfway house walls. But "Spider" is dominated by a few extraordinary performances with the ability to stir visceral reactions from beginning to end.

Continue reading: Spider Review

Get Carter Review


OK

If the rain-slicked new Sylvester Stallone revenge fantasy flick "Get Carter" seems a little familiar, it's with good reason.

It could be that the picture is a remake of a gnarly 1971 film of the same name (starring Michael Caine, who appears in this one too).

It could be that the bad-guy-going-after-worse-guys plot -- about a Las Vegas mob enforcer determined to find and snuff the people who whacked his estranged brother -- isn't all that different from the story of a hard-as-nails parolee avenging his daughter in last year's "The Limey."

Continue reading: Get Carter Review

The Prince & Me Review


Unbearable

Let me begin this review of the insultingly trite, insipidly twinkly, romantically suspect and aggressively unoriginal fairytale "The Prince and Me" with the least of the movie's thousands upon thousands of problems: It takes place in Wisconsin and Denmark between the months of September and January, and yet the trees are green, there's no snow on the ground and the characters never wear anything heavier than a long-sleeve shirt.

It's a movie in which all European royalty speak with English accents no matter what country they're from. It's a movie in which a character moves into a dorm room and starts taking classes 24 hours after deciding to go to college. (Admissions process? What's that?) It's a movie without an ounce of chemistry between its romantic leads, and it's a movie in which people are supposed to learn What's Really Important In Life -- and yet it cops out and goes for the crowd-pleaser ending that doesn't jive with the lessons supposedly learned.

But these are merely symptoms of a much larger problem, which is that there is not a single creative plot point, original line of dialogue, unique personality trait or even fresh note of music in the entire everygirl-meets-royal-hottie fantasy.

Continue reading: The Prince & Me Review

The Hours Review


Very Good

"The Hours" is an Oscar voter's nightmare. An adaptation of Michael Cunningham's novel about three women in three different time periods whose lives are profoundly affected by Virginia Woolf's "Mrs. Dalloway," the film features equally magnificent performances of nearly equal screen time from three of the best actresses working in film today.

Meryl Streep submerges herself in the self-sacrificing soul of Clarissa Vaughan, a modern Manhattan book editor whose longtime dear friend -- and volatile ex-lover -- Richard (Ed Harris) likes to ruffle her feathers by comparing her to the heroine of Woolf's book. Both women are externally serene, perfectionist party-throwers hiding deep reservoirs of regret over missed opportunities while living lives as mother-hen caretakers to others.

Julianne Moore plays Laura Brown, a fragile, pregnant 1950s housewife in the midst of reading "Mrs. Dalloway," whose deep depression (like Woolf's) and suicidal musings (like Dalloway's) go all but unnoticed by everyone except her young son (Jack Rovello), who clings to her apron strings with worry.

Continue reading: The Hours Review

King And I Review


Bad

Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't kids like the "The King and I"the way it was? All the kids I know do. I did when I was a kid. So whydid Warner Bros. feel it was necessary to drastically dumb it down andgive it a shopworn formulaic re-write when they created this new, animatedversion of the Rogers and Hammerstein classic?

"The King and I" seemed like a natural for animation-- a vivid, colorful setting, great role model leads, plenty of lessonsto learn without it feeling like Sunday school -- but animator RichardRich practically threw that all away in favor of casting the Kralahome,the king's traditionalist prime minister, as a sneering and supernaturalnefarian bent on dethroning his shiny-headed majesty.

Continue reading: King And I Review

Miranda Richardson

Miranda Richardson Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Miranda Richardson Movies

Stronger Movie Review

Stronger Movie Review

Based on a true story about the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, this looks like one...

Stronger Trailer

Stronger Trailer

There's something about national tragedy that has the ability to unite human beings and incite...

Churchill Movie Review

Churchill Movie Review

This drama about the iconic British prime minister tells a darkly personal story set over...

Churchill Trailer

Churchill Trailer

It's June 1944 and the war has been waging for five long years. British Prime...

Testament of Youth Movie Review

Testament of Youth Movie Review

A classic British memoir gets the full costume drama treatment with this beautifully crafted World...

Testament of Youth Trailer

Testament of Youth Trailer

Vera Brittain is an extraordinarily talented young woman who battles the odds to land herself...

Belle Movie Review

Belle Movie Review

The plot feels like a Jane Austen novel infused with a hot-potato political issue, but...

Maleficent Trailer

Maleficent Trailer

'Maleficent' stars Angelina Jolie and Elle Fanning talk about the upcoming fairytale movie alongside screenwriter...

Maleficent Trailer

Maleficent Trailer

Maleficent is a cruel sorceress who will stop at nothing to destroy those who have...

Maleficent - Teaser Trailer Trailer

Maleficent - Teaser Trailer Trailer

Maleficent is a merciless sorceress who dubs herself the 'Mistress of All Evil'. But she...

Belle Trailer

Belle Trailer

Dido Elizabeth Belle is the mixed race daughter of Royal Navy officer Captain John Lindsay...

Turtle: The Incredible Journey Trailer

Turtle: The Incredible Journey Trailer

A loggerhead turtle is born on a beach in Florida and starts on a journey...

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 2 Trailer

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 2 Trailer

Harry Potter and his friends, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger, continue their search for Voldemort's...

Made in Dagenham Movie Review

Made in Dagenham Movie Review

This engaging, warm British comedy-drama not only features extremely vivid characters but also traces the...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.