Miranda Otto

Miranda Otto

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Miranda Otto , Darcey O'Brien - Premiere Of Disney's "Alice Through The Looking Glass" at El Capitan Theatre, Disney - Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 24th May 2016

Miranda Otto and Darcey O'brien
Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto and Darcey O'brien
Miranda Otto and Darcey O'brien
Miranda Otto and Darcey O'brien
Miranda Otto and Darcey O'brien

Darcey O'Brien , Miranda Otto - Premiere of Disney's 'Alice Through The Looking Glass' - Arrivals at Disney - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 24th May 2016

Darcey O'brien and Miranda Otto

Atheer Adel, Rene Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic , F. Murray Abraham - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at Shrine Auditorium, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Atheer Adel, Rene Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic and F. Murray Abraham
Atheer Adel, Rene Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic and F. Murray Abraham
Miranda Otto

Atheer Adel, René Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic , F. Murray Abraham - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at The Shrine Expo Hall, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Atheer Adel, René Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic and F. Murray Abraham
Atheer Adel, René Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic and F. Murray Abraham

Miranda Otto - AACTA International Awards at Avalon Hollywood - Arrivals at Avalon Hollywood - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 29th January 2016

Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto

The Turning Trailer


In 2005, Australian author Tim Winton collected a series of 17 short stories and published them under the title 'The Turning'. The stories revolve around the character Vic Lang (Dougie Baldwin, Richard Roxburgh, Josh McConville, Casey Douglas and Dan Wyllie), with themes involving companionship, sentimentality and drug abuse. The book received multiple awards for the stories, and went on to become a part of the Western Australian English curriculum in schools. In 2013, the book was turned into a movie, nominated for numerous awards at the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards.  

Continue: The Turning Trailer

The Turning Review


Excellent

Life-changing moments feature in each of the nine short films in this Australian anthology, and each is told with remarkable artistry and sensitivity. While the filmmakers use different styles of filmmaking, there's a clever connection between the shorts, as themes of inner longing are made resonant by earthy honesty. So even if each brief segment film feels like just a fragment of an idea, taken together the film is remarkably moving.

It opens and closes with the animated "Ash Wednesday", using the T.S. Elliot poem to explore the idea of communal memory. From here a variety of mini-stories unfurl, often using the same character names even though the films are dramas, comedies or documentaries, and many have no dialogue at all. The lighter clips include "Reunion", in which a couple (Cate Blanchett and Richard Roxburgh) are surprised that spending Christmas with his mum isn't as awful as expected. "Cockleshell" follows a young guy (Toby Wallace) who's obsessed with the girl (Brenna Harding) next door. And both "Big World" and "Boner McPharlin's Moll" take lively kaleidoscopic looks at how reality is often nothing like our idea of how things should be.

Other segments are dark and provocative, including "Aquifer", about a man (Callan Mulvey) who is pushed by a news headline to recall a painful childhood memory. Two young boys (Jakory and Jarli-Russell Blanco) have a creepy adventure while on a beach day out with their dad and uncles in "Sand". The most moving film is "Commission", in which a young man (Josh McConville) drives to the outback to tell his estranged dad (Hugo Weaving) that his mother is dying. The best performance comes from Rose Byrne in the eponymous "The Turning", as a trailer-trash wife and mother whose friendship with a rich woman (Miranda Otto) sparks a religious epiphany. And the most unforgettable short is "Long, Clear View", impressively directed by Mia Wasikowska, which follows a young boy (Matthew Shanley) playing with his dad's rifle.

Continue reading: The Turning Review

The Homesman Review


Very Good

Strong characters and a vivid sense of life in frontier America give this film a kick of authentic energy that makes it a gripping journey. While it may be a little too serious for its own good, the movie is strikingly shot and played to bring out the gritty tenacity of people who dare to live in such a foreboding place. And a couple of shocking twists in the tale keep us on our toes.

In the Nebraska Territory in 1853, life was so difficult that three women (Grace Gummer, Miranda Otto and Sonja Richter) in a small community are driven mad by the isolation, desperation and harsh weather. Their husbands are too busy surviving to do anything about it, so the local pastor (John Lithgow) arranges for the strong-willed spinster farmer Mary Bee (Hilary Swank) to escort them back east to civilisation. She needs a "homesman" to help make the arduous five-week journey, so she drafts in drunken scoundrel George (Tommy Lee Jones). During their long trek across the plains, they have a series of potentially life-threatening encounters with the likes of well-armed Native Americans, an interfering opportunist (Tim Blake Nelson) and a cruelly dismissive hotel owner (James Spader).

The characters are strikingly feisty, starting with Swank's fiercely no-nonsense, self-sufficient Mary Bee, who one local observes is as good as any man around. She's also rather annoyingly holier-than-thou, which explains why she's has so much trouble finding a husband to help her. And these three women really push her to the breaking point: Gummer's Bella is consumed by grief, Otto's Theoline moans day and night, and Richter's Gro is a delusional menace. So it's a good thing that Jones provides some comic relief as the rapscallion George, a snarky realist who's the only likeable person on-screen.He also emerges along the way as the true protagonist of the tale.

Continue reading: The Homesman Review

The Homesman Trailer


George Briggs is a claim jumper who has only ever known a dishonest life. When he finds himself in serious trouble (sat astride an impatient horse with his hands bound behind his back and a noose around his neck tied to a branch), he starts to think this could finally be the end for him. That is until he is found by a lone woman with a wagon named Mary Bee Cuddy who agrees to free him from his plight in exchange for a favour. Living alone, she is struggling to carry out an important personal mission; she wants to take three insane women from Nebraska to Iowa now that their husbands can now longer cope with them. Thus, she asks Briggs to help her on the dangerous five week journey and, despite his serious reservations, he agrees to act as her aide and protector against the brutalities they may face along the way.

Continue: The Homesman Trailer

Reaching For The Moon Review


Very Good

Based on a true story, this Brazilian drama has a lush authenticity as it tells a story that has strong historical relevance even as it sometimes slips into heightened melodrama. Filmmaker Bruno Barreto recreates the events with sensitivity, bringing the real people to life in complex, emotional ways. So while it's sometimes a bit tormented, it's also fascinating.

In 1951, American poet Elizabeth Bishop (Miranda Otto) leaves her boyfriend (Treat Williams) in New York to travel to Rio de Janeiro to visit her old university friend Mary (Tracy Middendorf) and her new girlfriend, the noted architect Lota de Macedo Soares (Gloria Pires). They live in idyllic splendour in Lota's country estate, where the painfully shy Elizabeth is pried out of her shell by an overt display of affection from Lota. When Mary gets jealous, Lota agrees to adopt a baby, as long as she can keep Elizabeth as well. So they create a rather tense family together, which is strained badly by emotions as the years go by. But they find common ground when they get involved in the election campaign of their politician friend Carlos Lacerda (Marcello Airoldi).

This three-way relationship is clearly never going to last, but these women give it a go. Lota's complete rejection of society's rules is intriguing as it leads to some of her more iconic design work, but her Latina temperament also gets the best of her as she can't bear to let Elizabeth out of her sight. Intriguingly, the script reflects but never exaggerates repressed 1950s and 60s attitudes, layering in all kinds of dark meaning between every line of dialogue. Which makes every scene feel rather gloomy.

Continue reading: Reaching For The Moon Review

I, Frankenstein Review


OK

Even with its relentlessly cliched production design (trenchcoats and flickering candles galore), this raucous gothic thriller deploys enough visual flash to hold our attention. The gigantic effects-heavy action sequences are eye-catching and sometimes exciting, and there are elements of the story that almost begin to resonate before the script veers off in another more simplistic direction.

Based on a graphic novel, the story picks up where Mary Shelley's novel left off, as the monster (Eckhart) is attacked by demons that want to study his non-human existence. He's rescued by gargoyles, angelic protectors of humanity, and taken to their Queen Lenore (Miranda Otto), who names him Adam and enlists him in the demon-killing cause. Although her second-in-command (Courtney) isn't so sure. Over the next 200 years, Adam hones his skills before returning to Lenore just as the demon Prince Naberius (Nighy) is launching his evil plan to re-animate a dead army with the help of sexy scientist Terra (Strahovski) and Dr Frankenstein's journal. In other words, all hell is about to break loose.

Annoyingly, every time the plot begins to get interesting, writer-director Beattie indulges in another vacuous action set piece that's as irrelevant as the 3D. There's a decent story in here about the nature of the human soul, religious fervour and moral tenacity, but the film only uses these things as devices to make the dialog sound intelligent. Which is tricky since Beattie directs his cast to deliver their lines in growling, blurting monotone. Eckhart's voice-over narration is particularly dull. And this over-earnest tone leaves every potential relationship as a non-starter.

Continue reading: I, Frankenstein Review

'I, Frankenstein' Fails To Raise Critics' Pulses


Aaron Eckhart Frankenstein Bill Nighy Yvonne Strahovski Miranda Otto Aden Young Caitlin Stasey

I, Frankenstein, the latest adaptation of Mary Shelley's classic novel, has been crushed by critics and no electrical cables or extra body parts seem likely to rebuild its reputation.

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart stars as Adam, Frankenstein's monster.

The creators of the Underworld saga have contributed to this supernatural monstrosity, which is hardly surprising considering the standards of the latter movies in that particular franchise. The film is based on the graphic novel of the same name by Kevin Grevioux which places Frankenstein's monster in an alternative present day where gargoyles and demons struggle for dominance. 

Continue reading: 'I, Frankenstein' Fails To Raise Critics' Pulses

The Healer Review


Good
Looking to go to bed depressed, moping, and on the verge of suicidal? Look no farther than The Healer, a pedigreed movie with such a dark core than it's no mystery it never merited a theatrical release of any consequence. (The original title, Julie Walking Home, couldn't have helped either.)

Canadian Julie (Miranda Otto) returns home from a trip with her two twin children, only to find husband Henry (William Fichtner) in bed with another woman. Like that, her marriage is ruined. Days later, she discovers her son (Ryan Smith) has cancer. Soon after that, we learn he's allergic to the chemotherapy. Julie just can't catch a break. Julie hears about a faith healer in Poland and decides to take her son there to get some healin'. (Why Poland? Could have something to do with writer/director Agnieszka Holland (Oscar nominated for Europa Europa in 1992), who hails from the country.)

Continue reading: The Healer Review

War Of The Worlds Review


OK
Steven Spielberg's huge-budget update of "The Warof the Worlds," H.G. Wells' seminal alien-invasion novel from 1898,is a problematic blockbuster with one essential saving grace: It's profoundlyfrightening in a way that few directors have the talent to capture.

I'm not talking about masked-psycho-with-a-chainsaw scary.That's kids' stuff. This is a slow, relentless, meticulous fear. It's thefear of uncertainty, the fear of grand-scale devastation that humanityis powerless to stop. It's a fear that fills the air like a storm and creepsup your spine in a way that's hard to shake. It is a fear not unlike whatevery American felt on September 11, 2001 -- but divorced from fact andrealigned as entertainment through the subconsciously reassuring comfortof a movie theater seat and a tub of popcorn.

It's visceral, it's psychological, and it comes more fromthe terrified performances of Tom Cruise and the remarkable Dakota Fanning(the angelic 10-year-old from "Hide& Seek" and "Manon Fire") -- as a dock-worker deadbeatdad and his daughter on the run from 100-foot alien killing machines --than from the film's hyper-realistic special effects and monsters (whicharen't that different from the ones in the shamelessly corny "Warof the Worlds" rip-off "Independence Day").

The film is worth seeing just to experience this fear,which is a testament to the power of cinema.

Continue reading: War Of The Worlds Review

What Lies Beneath Review


Weak

Robert Zemeckis' self-indulgent direction hangs like an albatross around the celluloid neck of "What Lies Beneath," a soft-peddled yuppie horror flick that could have been -- with some fine tuning -- a sharp and genuinely scary thriller.

Forty minutes longer than necessary and featuring a cry-scream-and-run climax so drawn out that every ounce of tension evaporates from the screen half an hour before the credits roll, it's a frustrating movie to watch because of all the wasted potential.

Anything but a standard teens-in-peril slasher movie, "What Lies Beneath" stars Michelle Pfeiffer as a New England mom with empty nest syndrome after packing her daughter off to college in the opening scenes. Now alone in the house a lot, she becomes a busy body, spying on the new next door neighbors and witnessing what she thinks is a murder.

Continue reading: What Lies Beneath Review

Miranda Otto

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Miranda Otto Movies

The Turning Trailer

The Turning Trailer

In 2005, Australian author Tim Winton collected a series of 17 short stories and published...

The Turning Movie Review

The Turning Movie Review

Life-changing moments feature in each of the nine short films in this Australian anthology, and...

The Homesman Movie Review

The Homesman Movie Review

Strong characters and a vivid sense of life in frontier America give this film a...

The Homesman Trailer

The Homesman Trailer

George Briggs is a claim jumper who has only ever known a dishonest life. When...

Reaching for the Moon Movie Review

Reaching for the Moon Movie Review

Based on a true story, this Brazilian drama has a lush authenticity as it tells...

I, Frankenstein Movie Review

I, Frankenstein Movie Review

Even with its relentlessly cliched production design (trenchcoats and flickering candles galore), this raucous gothic...

I, Frankenstein Trailer

I, Frankenstein Trailer

Adam is the original creature created by Dr. Frankenstein 200 years ago and has taken...

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Movie Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Movie Review

Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The...

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Movie Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Movie Review

Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings...

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Movie Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Movie Review

Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The...

Flight of the Phoenix (2004) Movie Review

Flight of the Phoenix (2004) Movie Review

Even if you're not familiar with the original 1965 version of this film, the title...

Danny Deckchair Movie Review

Danny Deckchair Movie Review

In the game of life, Danny Morgan (Rhys Ifans) is a checkers piece sitting on...

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