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Brad's Status Trailer


Not everyone gets to the place they thought they would get to in life. Nothing rings more true than that for Brad Sloan (Ben Stiller). His college friends have all gone on to bigger and better things; Craig Fisher (Michael Sheen) ended up in the White House, Jason Hatfield (Luke Wilson) formed his own hedge fund company and Billy Wearslter (Jemaine Clement) sold his business and got to retire at 40-years-old. Brad, meanwhile, put all his efforts into a non-profit venture - and that's exactly what he has to show for it. None of the luxury and wealth of his classmates, but he does have a son he's incredibly proud of.

Troy Sloan (Austin Abrams) is a talented musician who's smart enough to get into pretty much any college he chooses including Harvard. Brad takes him on a tour of colleges across the East Coast, and while he initially doesn't want to put too much pressure on Troy, he soon gets over-zealous by the prospect of Harvard that he can't stop himself from heaping advice onto his son who's anxious enough as it is. Brad just doesn't want Troy to end up struggling like he is, but he's going the wrong way about ensuring his success - especially when he bumps into one of his old friends and starts doubting his own successes (or lack thereof) in life.

'Brad's Status' is a comedy drama directed and written by Mike White ('School of Rock', 'The Good Girl', 'The Emoji Movie'). It was nominated for the Platform Prize at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival, and was released in theatres on September 15th 2017.

The Emoji Movie Review

Weak

There's no reason why this animated comedy adventure needed to be this pointless. Solidly entertaining movies have been made using far less as source material (see The Lego Movie). But while there are some hilarious verbal and visual gags peppered throughout this movie, it all hinges on a script that's painfully obvious and animation that simply isn't inventive enough to hold the attention without a decent story and stronger characters.

It's set in Textopolis, an app inside the smartphone of the teen Alex (Jake T. Austin). The central character is Gene (T.J. Miller), who has far too many expressions for a meh emoji. His parents (Jennifer Coolidge and Steven Wright) worry that he has some sort of defect. Threatened by the cruel senior emoji Smiler (Maya Rudolph), Gene and his pal Hi-5 (James Cordon) sneak out of the app in search of the hacker Jailbreak (Anna Faris), who can help reprogramme him if they can make it to the cloud. But Smiler sends a team of killer bots in hot pursuit.

Yes, the plot is cursory at best, and essentially exists only so the film can namecheck carefully placed apps in a series of sponsored, rather pointless extended set pieces. This leaves the movie feeling like a low-rent variation on Wreck-It Ralph, although only a few of these sequences have any visual interest. The Candy Crush world is at least a colourful alternative to the dull digital look of most of most of the movie. And the lack of imagination shows in the depiction of music streaming as a stream and a firewall as a wall of fire. There's also a strange rush to violence in almost every sequence, as the bots continually try to delete our heroes.

Continue reading: The Emoji Movie Review

The D Train Review

Excellent

A provocative drama wrapped in the skin of an adult sex comedy, this sharply written and performed movie is hugely entertaining even as it grapples with some big issues. The central themes here are notions of celebrity and sexuality, neither of which is nearly as clear-cut as the audience or characters think they are. And the script allows actors like Jack Black and James Marsden to do what they do best while undermining their usual personas with some edgy shadings.

Black plays Dan, the self-proclaimed leader of his high school class' 20-year reunion. He has always felt invisible, and is annoyed that he gets no respect from the reunion committee. Then he spots hot classmate Oliver (Marsden) in a TV advert and hatches a plan to increase his popularity by convincing Oliver to attend the reunion. He lies to his boss (Jeffrey Tambor) about needing to go to Los Angeles on business, and he gets carried away as the openly bisexual Oliver shows him the partying lifestyle, taking things far beyond where he thought his limits were. Back home, he can't admit any of this to his sharp wife (Kathryn Hahn) and begins to lose touch with his smart teen son (Russell Posner). Then when Oliver turns up, things get even more precarious.

Filmmakers Andrew Mogel and Jarrad Paul get everyone into this mess in the usual ways, with snappy dialogue, goofy antics and rather a lot of humiliating embarrassment for poor Dan. Then they do something interesting: they refuse to play it safe, taking a surprisingly complex journey through questions about everything from peer pressure and family dynamics to the illusion of fame and the unspoken spectrum of sexuality. So even though the characters aren't always likeable, and even though all of them make some questionable choices, they're unusually sympathetic because the astute script and performances make them thoroughly recognisable.

Continue reading: The D Train Review

Mike White - Mike White out and about in Beverly Hills at Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 3rd September 2015

Mike White
Mike White
Mike White
Mike White

Mike White - Director Mike White goes out and about running errands in Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 30th July 2015

Mike White
Mike White
Mike White
Mike White

The D Train Trailer


Nobody really wants to attend their school reunion. Nobody, except for maybe Dan Landsman (Jack Black), who is the self-appointed head of the school reunion committee. After slogging through days of rejections, Dan is beginning to believe that no one is going to come to the 20th Anniversary reunion for their high school - that is, until he turns on the television and sees Oliver Lawless (James Marsden). Lawless, a once popular student, is now a relatively successful actor, and Dan believes that getting him to attend the reunion will convince everyone else to come along. But when he meets up with Lawless for the first time in twenty years, something goes wrong. Lawless is going to attend the reunion, and it is on track to be a massive success, but Dan no longer feels so good about it.

Continue: The D Train Trailer

Mike White - Celebrities attend Dancing for NED, a dance party to raise funds for the Cedars-Sinai Women's Cancer Program at UNICI CASA in Culver City - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 3rd May 2014

Mike White
Mike White
Mike White
Mike White
Mike White
Mike White

Mike White - Celebrities attend 6th Annual GO GO Gala at Bel Air Bay Club in Pacific Palisades. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 14th November 2013

Mike White
Mike White
Mike White
Mike White
Mike White
Mike White

Richard Linklater, Mike White, Miranda Cosgrove and Jack Black - AFS (Austin Film Society) presents 'The School of Rock' 10-Year Reunion - Austin, Texas, United States - Thursday 29th August 2013

Richard Linklater, Mike White, Miranda Cosgrove and Jack Black
Richard Linklater, Mike White, Miranda Cosgrove and Jack Black
Richard Linklater, Jack Black and Mike White
Richard Linklater, Jack Black and Mike White
Richard Linklater, Jack Black and Mike White
Richard Linklater, Mike White, Miranda Cosgrove and Jack Black

Zombieland Review


Very Good
A sharply clever script and relentlessly kinetic structure keep us thoroughly entertained all the way through this corny zombie action-comedy. Although there's also the gnawing realisation that there's absolutely no subtext at all.

Zombies have taken over America and the few remaining humans are fending for their lives. Names are irrelevant, so they use their hometowns: Columbus (Eisenberg) is a resourceful nerd who teams up with bonkers fighter Tallahassee (Harrelson) to try to find someone else who's alive. They run into two con-artist sisters, Wichita and Little Rock (Stone and Breslin), and set off on a perilous cross-country journey to find the last enclave of humanity. Not only are they attacked at every turn by the snarling, toothy undead, but they don't really trust each other.

Continue reading: Zombieland Review

Smother Review


Terrible
It's so sad watching really talented people grasp at straws in a project that was doomed from conception. Nothing works in Smother, and nothing ever should -- it is a story that doesn't need to be told, makes jokes that would never be construed as funny, and represents money that should never have been spent. Watching actors like Diane Keaton and Liv Tyler get saddled with impossibly unfunny, disrespectful material is like watching the slow-motion video of the guy getting hit with the cannonball -- they are lining up to get submarined by a movie that had no business being made.

Smother is a catastrophic train wreck that rightfully abandoned any hope of being released theatrically, but isn't even a solid bet for mindless entertainment in its final destination on video store shelves. The entire movie reminds me of one of those Saturday Night Live sketches centered on a character with a very uncomfortable one-note quirk, like "Massive Head Wound Harry" or "Debbie Downer." This film could have been titled Madcap Marilyn, and the title would have fit the material, but the movie still would have sucked.

Continue reading: Smother Review

Year Of The Dog Review


Weak
There's a passage in Evelyn Waugh's The Loved One that lends itself directly to Mike White's Year of the Dog, regardless of where the film runs with this idea. Said by the owner of a pet mortuary to a lowly employee concerning normal funeral homes: "Why wouldn't I be [jealous of] all that dough going to relations they've hated all their lives, while the pets who've loved them and stood by them, never asked no questions, never complained, rich or poor, sickness or health, get buried anyway like animals?" Correctly assuming that as a public we take the love we can't find with humans and bestow it on animals, Waugh's criticism has more than a leg up on Mike White's directorial debut.

Peggy (Molly Shannon) dotes on Pencil, her puppy, with the affection only rewarded to the luckiest of children from the most spoiling of parents. So, when Pencil gets into some toxic shrubbery and goes, as all dogs do, to heaven, Peggy is inconsolable. Not that there aren't plenty of people who want to help her. Her oafish neighbor (John C. Reilly) wants to date her, her best friend (Regina King) wants to set her up with someone, and the receptionist at the vet (the invaluable Peter Sarsgaard) wants to get her a new dog ASAP. It's the receptionist, Newt, who gets Peggy into veganism and, ostensibly, sends her on a path of social destruction the likes of which are rarely seen.

Continue reading: Year Of The Dog Review

Chuck & Buck Review


Terrible

Ninety-five minutes of feeling creeped out and uncomfortable passes for indie flick entertainment in "Chuck and Buck," a movie in which the audience supposed to sympathize with a stalker just because he's naive and slow-witted.

Buck, you see, never grew up. He's a 27-year-old whose mind gave up around age 11. He wipes his nose on the back of his hand; sucks on lollypops all day; makes collages with construction paper cut-outs, sparkles and Elmer's Glue. And when his mother dies, he becomes consumed by an obsession with his "best friend" Chuck -- a kid he grew up with but hasn't seen in 15 years.

The two childhood pals are reunited at the funeral, and for the simple, infantile Buck nothing has changed. He's ready for the two of them to run through sprinklers or play Chutes and Ladders.

Continue reading: Chuck & Buck Review

School Of Rock Review


Weak

Jack Black isn't an actor, he's a clown -- and a one-schitck clown at that.

Compare any two-minute clip of his new comedy "School of Rock" to any of his scenes from "Orange County," "Shallow Hal" or "Saving Silverman," and you'll see the exact same tongue-wagging and eye-bugging mugging, the exact same frenzied, finger-knotting gestures and roly-poly, off-balance dancing, the exact same eyebrow-stitching failed attempts at momentary sincerity, and the exact same set-devouring dialogue delivery.

"Read between the lines, baby! Read between the lines!" he whispers then screams, whispers then screams while giving a three-fingered flip-off to the musicians who have just kicked the embarrassing stage-hog out of their band in this movie's establishing scene.

Continue reading: School Of Rock Review

Orange County Review


Good

Somewhere inside the surprisingly fresh, sharply jocular, angst-of-youth comedy "Orange County" there's a trite, typical teen movie struggling to get out. But director Jake Kasden just keeps out-witting the monster, pulling the carpet out from under its inherent clichés and giving his characters the chance to breathe and break free of their stock moldings.

A screwball affair about a bookwormy high school beach bum from the SoCal 'burbs who thinks his life is over when he doesn't get into Stanford, this flick rises above the spiritless, increasingly insipid, cookie-cutter teen genre simply because Kasden ("Zero Effect") and screenwriter Mike White ("Chuck and Buck") cared enough to try a little harder.

Played with pitch-perfect Everykid exasperation by sublimely expressive string bean Colin Hanks (son of Tom), Shaun Brumder had his heart set on pursuing his literary aspirations under the tutelage of his favorite writer, a professor at the venerated campus. So when he finds out his rejection was the fault of an inept guidance counselor (Lily Tomlin -- in the first of several inspired cameo performances) who sent the wrong transcript, Shaun goes on a dogged mission to get the decision reconsidered.

Continue reading: Orange County Review

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Mike White Movies

Brad's Status Trailer

Brad's Status Trailer

Not everyone gets to the place they thought they would get to in life. Nothing...

The Emoji Movie Movie Review

The Emoji Movie Movie Review

There's no reason why this animated comedy adventure needed to be this pointless. Solidly entertaining...

The D Train Movie Review

The D Train Movie Review

A provocative drama wrapped in the skin of an adult sex comedy, this sharply written...

The D Train Trailer

The D Train Trailer

Nobody really wants to attend their school reunion. Nobody, except for maybe Dan Landsman (Jack...

Zombieland Movie Review

Zombieland Movie Review

A sharply clever script and relentlessly kinetic structure keep us thoroughly entertained all the way...

Year of the Dog Movie Review

Year of the Dog Movie Review

There's a passage in Evelyn Waugh's The Loved One that lends itself directly to Mike...

Nacho Libre Movie Review

Nacho Libre Movie Review

Husband-and-wife filmmakers Jared and Jerusha Hess share a bizarre sense of humor, one that's difficult...

The School of Rock Movie Review

The School of Rock Movie Review

A collaboration between indie auteur director Richard Linklater (Before Sunrise, Dazed and Confused) and taboo-pushing...

Orange County Movie Review

Orange County Movie Review

Forget She's All That and its brethren. Back in the 1980s, the maestro of teen...

The Good Girl Movie Review

The Good Girl Movie Review

The Good Girl is as close as you can get to nothing and still have...

Chuck & Buck Movie Review

Chuck & Buck Movie Review

Forgiveness is a thing most people long for in their lives. Forgiveness represents a...

The Stepford Wives Movie Review

The Stepford Wives Movie Review

Screenwriter Paul Rudnick (Adams Family Values, In and Out ) is wicked with the one-liners,...

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