Mike Fleiss

Mike Fleiss

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Picture - Raul de Molina, Kris Jenner,... , Saturday 14th January 2012

Raul De Molina, Kris Jenner, Lara Spencer, Mark Ballas, Mike Fleiss, Miss America, Teri Polo and Planet Hollywood - Raul de Molina, Kris Jenner, Lara Spencer, Laura Kaeppeler 2012 MIss America, Chris Powell, Mike Fleiss, Teri Polo, Mark Ballas Saturday 14th January 2012 2012 Miss America Pageant Winner News Conference at Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino

Picture - Mike Fleiss , Saturday 14th January 2012

Mike Fleiss and Planet Hollywood Saturday 14th January 2012 2012 Miss America Pageant Winner News Conference at Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino

Picture - Mike Fleiss Los Angeles, California, Thursday 1st September 2011

Mike Fleiss Thursday 1st September 2011 Screening of 'Shark Night' at the Universal CityWalk - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Hostel: Part II Review


Unbearable
Let's lay the cards on the table: Hostel, to me, was one of the coldest, most blindly-conceived horror films to get released in years, basically acting as torture porn rather than an actual film. So, the fact that Hostel: Part II is more thuggishly ambivalent to thought and structure, more cold and condescending to its audience and its characters, and more wildly absurd in both tone and execution doesn't come as a surprise. To be honest, it makes sense that after two thoroughly fascinating horror experiments (Bug and 28 Weeks Later) are released that Hostel: Part II will easily make enough money to secure a third installment and will set the horror genre back a solid decade.

Basically, Part II is Hostel plus a B-cup. Three girls (Lauren German, Bijou Phillips, and Heather Matarazzo) are in Europe studying art. One of the models for the art course is a statuesque beauty (Vera Jordanova) who befriends the girls and starts a friendship with one girl that borders on lesbianism. Of course, the model gets them to go to a special hot springs and stay at a hostel. Shortly after arriving, the girls are drugged, dragged, and prepped for a slab or a death seat.

Continue reading: Hostel: Part II Review

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning Review


Terrible
There's a great conversation that goes on in the original The Texas Chainsaw Massacre where a crazed man and a van of hippies awkwardly talk about the difference between the new way of killing cattle and the old, barbaric ways. The new way is painless and more sanitary in general, but it was bad for social matters (layoffs, machinery-over-manpower etc.) but the old way was brutal, unclean and considered inhumane. At the time, this conversation was meant to point out how the '60s counter-culture wanted to help the poor workers but disapproved and actually fought to get rid of the jobs they had. How proper it is that now, 32 years after the original and three years after the original remake, the same argument can be used to discuss what has now become the Texas Chainsaw Massacre franchise.

The film begins with the terrifically gruesome birth of none other than Tommy Hewitt, aka Leatherface (Andrew Bryniarski). He is born in the dark, dirty floor of an old-style killing floor, and thrown out in the garbage behind the plant. There, he is saved by an elderly woman who brings him home and puts him under the care of his Uncle Charlie (R. Lee Ermey), who later takes on the identity of Sheriff Hoyt, the Texas town's only cop who is disposed of after he calls Tommy "retarded." Time passes and the Hewitt family, at the full swing of the Vietnam War, happens upon two soldiers and their girlfriends. Only one of the girlfriends (Jordana Brewster) stands a chance of surviving the night.

Continue reading: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning Review

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning Review


Terrible
There's a great conversation that goes on in the original The Texas Chainsaw Massacre where a crazed man and a van of hippies awkwardly talk about the difference between the new way of killing cattle and the old, barbaric ways. The new way is painless and more sanitary in general, but it was bad for social matters (layoffs, machinery-over-manpower etc.) but the old way was brutal, unclean and considered inhumane. At the time, this conversation was meant to point out how the '60s counter-culture wanted to help the poor workers but disapproved and actually fought to get rid of the jobs they had. How proper it is that now, 32 years after the original and three years after the original remake, the same argument can be used to discuss what has now become the Texas Chainsaw Massacre franchise.

The film begins with the terrifically gruesome birth of none other than Tommy Hewitt, aka Leatherface (Andrew Bryniarski). He is born in the dark, dirty floor of an old-style killing floor, and thrown out in the garbage behind the plant. There, he is saved by an elderly woman who brings him home and puts him under the care of his Uncle Charlie (R. Lee Ermey), who later takes on the identity of Sheriff Hoyt, the Texas town's only cop who is disposed of after he calls Tommy "retarded." Time passes and the Hewitt family, at the full swing of the Vietnam War, happens upon two soldiers and their girlfriends. Only one of the girlfriends (Jordana Brewster) stands a chance of surviving the night.

Continue reading: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning Review

Poseidon Review


Weak

34 years ago, The Poseidon Adventure rode the trendy disaster meme of its day to stellar box office and numerous Oscar nominations. Today, Poseidon sits poised to ride the current effects meme to similar financial reward and perhaps some technical nods to boot. What it probably won't see is acclaim for its dialogue, story, or characters, but those laurels largely eluded its predecessor as well.

As with its forerunner, Poseidon opens with an introduction to its namesake, a massive luxury liner, and its passengers, which in this installment include an ex-mayor/firefighter (Kurt Russell), his daughter (Emmy Rossum), her beloved (Mike Vogel), a gambler (Josh Lucas), a jilted lover (Richard Dreyfuss), a stowaway (Mía Maestro), an inevitably hot single mom (Jacinda Barrett), her inevitably adorable tyke (Jimmy Bennett), and a waiter (a completely wasted Freddy Rodríguez). If you think reading a list of these stereotypes is tiresome, watching them establish their personas is more so.

Continue reading: Poseidon Review

Hostel Review


Weak
This day and age, money can buy you just about anything. Sex. Power. Real estate. Expensive cars. Yachts. Vacations. But once you've experienced all that money can buy -- and all the world has to offer -- what can do you for excitement? Is it possible to purchase something unforgettable when the very essence of the word is your day-to-day life?

According to Hostel, extremely wealthy and over privileged businessman can buy something they won't soon forget: another human being's life. Americans are expensive, but if you're open to the ethnicity of your purchase, you can get a human for a fairly reasonable price. But we are not talking about selling humans into slavery. These clients are purchasing "products" to torture and kill.

Continue reading: Hostel Review

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003) Review


Unbearable
Aren't remakes intended to improve on the films they're honoring? First-time director Marcus Nispel may return audiences to the Lone Star State to recreate the horrific and (not really) "factual" events of August 20, 1973, when five hippies were abducted and tortured by a killer named Leatherface and his inbred family of cannibals. But this flavorless rehash ultimately proves you can't just fire up a power tool, hang an innocent teenager on a meat hook, and call yourself The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

The new Massacre hacks away everything different and inventive Tobe Hooper's original film did for the horror genre. Graphic yet pointless, it introduces five teenagers returning from a Mexican vacation who make the fatal mistake of stopping to ask a woman wandering the side of the road if she needs a ride. They assume she's on a bad acid trip, and intend to turn her over to the local authorities. Little do they know that their bad trip has just begun.

Continue reading: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003) Review

Mike Fleiss

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