Mike Figgis

Mike Figgis

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Cressida Bonas outside The Rosemary Branch Theatre

Cressida Bonas, Mike Figgis and Daniel Bruhl - Cressida Bonas chats with actor Daniel Bruhl and Director Mike Figgis outside The Rosemary Branch Theatre after appearing 'There's A Monster In The Lake' - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 17th July 2014

Cressida Bonas
Cressida Bonas
Cressida Bonas, Mike Figgis and Daniel Bruhl
Cressida Bonas, Mike Figgis and Daniel Bruhl
Cressida Bonas

Suspension of Disbelief Review


Weak

Oscar-nominated filmmaker Mike Figgis (Leaving Las Vegas) continues to explore experimental styles of cinema (see Timecode or Hotel) with this playful in-joke about the act of artistic creation. It's an ambitious idea that never quite overcomes the indulgent approach, but the gimmicky touches and mysterious noir vibe hold our interest even if the characters are never very clearly developed.

At the centre is screenwriter Martin (Koch), who lectures at a London film school as his long-awaited new script is finally going into production. His daughter Sarah (Night) has landed a lead role in the film, and Martin celebrates this with her at her 25th birthday. He also becomes fascinated by her friend Angelique (Verbeek), who turns up dead in a canal the next morning, leaving him as the prime suspect. A police inspector (Cranham) is especially suspicious since Martin's wife (Fox in flashback) went missing 15 years ago. Then Angelique's twin Therese (also Verbeek) turns up to twist things further.

Figgis continually throws us out of the story by referring to the film within the film. For example, characters are continually picking up movie scripts that describe them picking up movie scripts. And Figgis further tweaks us with on-screen captions, split-screen angles and movie-set camera gags, plus of course the fact that a central character is an identical twin. But because of all of this self-referential trickery, we can never engage with the story or characters at all.

Continue reading: Suspension of Disbelief Review

Friends of the Earth's Extraordinary Banquet event

Galen Ayers and Mike Figgis - Friends of the Earth's Extraordinary Banquet event held at London's One Mayfair - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 14th March 2013

Mike Figgis and Rosie Chan

10:10 - launch held at the Turbine Hall, Tate Modern.

Sara Cox, Ken Livingstone and Mike Figgis - Sara Cox, Franny Armstrong, Ken Livingstone, Antony Gormley, Alistair McGowan, Kevin McCloud, Diana Athill, Jeremy Hardy, Tony Juniper, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Michael Craig-Martin, Deborah Moggach, Andrew Motion, Shami Chakrabarti, Adhaf Souief, Peter Tatchell, Harold Tillman, Livia Firth, Mike Figgis, Sarah Waters Cox DJs, Armstrong speaks and others attend launch of scheme pledging to cut 10 per cent of CO2 emissions by 2010. Celebrities, business leaders and members of the public sign up to do their bit for the environment. London, England - 10:10 - launch held at the Turbine Hall, Tate Modern. Tuesday 1st September 2009

10:10 - launch held at the Turbine Hall, Tate Modern

Sara Cox, Ken Livingstone and Mike Figgis - Sara Cox, Franny Armstrong, Ken Livingstone, Antony Gormley, Alistair McGowan, Kevin McCloud, Diana Athill, Jeremy Hardy, Tony Juniper, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Michael Craig-Martin, Deborah Moggach, Andrew Motion, Shami Chakrabarti, Adhaf Souief, Peter Tatchell, Harold Tillman, Livia Firth, Mike Figgis, Sarah Waters 10:10 Environmental Campaign launch at the Turbine Gallery at the Tate Modern to cut 10 percent of CO2 emissions by 2010 London, England - 10:10 - launch held at the Turbine Hall, Tate Modern Tuesday 1st September 2009

Sara Cox, Ken Livingstone and Mike Figgis

Glenmorangie 5 Senses By Mike Figgis - private view held at Proud galleries

Charlotte Asprey and Mike Figgis Tuesday 13th May 2008 Glenmorangie 5 Senses By Mike Figgis - private view held at Proud galleries London, England

Charlotte Asprey and Mike Figgis

Liebestraum Review


Good
Mike Figgis channels David Lynch and the Coen brothers' Barton Fink in this atmospheric neo-noir about a journalist who gets involved with an old friend's wife on the eve of the destruction of a historic cast-iron building. Ironically enough, the building is the site of a years-earlier triple-murder/suicide, in which a vengeful husband killed two cheating lovers.... Putting this all together isn't simple, as Figgis's way-convoluted tale takes you down many a dream-sequenced road. But the ride is a fun one, and the cast is surprisingly apt.

Cold Creek Manor Review


Unbearable
Cold Creek Manor - the heavily marketed new thriller by Touchstone Pictures that stars some of Hollywood's most gifted actors - is without a single creative element. Put simply, it's one of the worst films of the year.

After their son is injured walking on the bustling streets of New York City, Cooper and Leah Tilson (Dennis Quaid and Sharon Stone) inexplicably decide to move their family to the "safer" confines of the countryside (because danger certainly doesn't lurk out there). The house they buy is Cold Creek Manor, a massive property that is in complete disrepair and requires more work to fix than humanly possible. It's not exactly clear why they choose this shabby house; the only clue given is that Cooper, a documentary filmmaker, finds the photos and documents left behind as intriguing subject matter for his next low budget project.

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Miss Julie Review


Grim
After single handedly crafting the worst film of 1999, the unbearably heavy handed art house rubbish The Loss of Sexual Innocence, jazzy auteur Mike Figgis brings his experimental eye to an adaptation of August Strindberg's Miss Julie.

It's a brilliant play, one which observes naturalistic behavior and flawed, complex characters without judgment. It's filled with beautifully written scenes of emotional conviction. Naturally, Figgis is so hell bent on his radical tinkering with form and content that the story becomes a muddle of sensual implications taken straight from fashion magazine perfume ads.

Continue reading: Miss Julie Review

One Night Stand Review


Grim
Another oddity from auteur director/jazz musician Mike Figgis (Leaving Las Vegas), this time with Wesley Snipes in a loveless marriage, tempted by Nastassja Kinski. Nastassja Kinski? Yep, still trying to play the femme fatale and not doing a great job of it. Ming-Na Wen has a puzzling role, and Downey's dying friend subplot only distracts the viewer even further from the fact that there's not much going on here. Despite a couple of obvious twists, One Night Stand never really goes anywhere new. Safe to avoid this one.

Leaving Las Vegas Review


Excellent
The main way Leaving Las Vegas has been described to me is this: "It's very, very sad." Finally able to see for myself, I can confirm that indeed the film is not the feel-good movie of the year. And while it's sad and spooky enough to send shivers down your spine, it is surprisingly able to avoid melodramatics and still leave us with a powerful message.

Leaving Las Vegas tells the tragic story of Ben Sanderson (Nicolas Cage), a once-powerful movie executive who is fired from his job and ends up moving to Las Vegas. Ben is painfully and obviously an alcoholic; drinking, quite literally, consumes his life. We get a glimpse of the demons in Ben's past from time to time, but by the time the film begins, Ben is already too far gone to be remotely curable. Alcohol has become his reason for existence.

Continue reading: Leaving Las Vegas Review

Hotel Review


Terrible
I like Mike Figgis a lot... as a person, I mean. Frankly, I haven't been able to make any sense of his movies since Leaving Las Vegas, and Hotel is probably his least accessible work ever.

The story -- as it exists -- concerns a troupe of British actors who descend on Venice to shoot a film version of the play The Duchess of Malfi. We follow the production with Figgis's all-seeing camera (courtesy of a documentarian following the production) -- which has a tendency to dip into slow-motion, cut the sound out, and shoot using an ultraviolet filter in the dark -- and bear witness to all manner of strange goings-on, the description of which I can't even begin to fathom putting on paper.

Continue reading: Hotel Review

The Loss of Sexual Innocence Review


Weak
Jesus, when I went to the movies today I didn't know I was going to have to think!

Mike Figgis, the genius behind Leaving Las Vegas, has put together one dense piece of celluloid here, his first outing since One Night Stand tanked last year.

Continue reading: The Loss of Sexual Innocence Review

Time Code Review


OK
Sorry, Mr. Lynch, your place at the head of the avant-garde experimental filmmaker table has been given away. Messrs. Jarmusch, Toback, Korine, and Cronenberg, you'll all be eating outside. Mike Figgis will be taking over for all of you, and don't come back.

Figgis, who earned a Best Director Oscar nomination for Leaving Las Vegas in 1996, appears to have gone a little funny in the head last year with his inexplicable and nearly dialogue-free The Loss of Sexual Innocence. Now he's fully gone off the deep end with what may be the most ambitious experiment ever: Time Code.

Continue reading: Time Code Review

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