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Mickey Rourke - Mickey Rourke leaving Cafe Roma in Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 27th May 2016

Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke

Mickey Rourke - Mickey Rourke gets lunch at Caffe Roma in Beverly Hills at beverly hills - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 17th May 2016

Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke

Mickey Rourke - Mickey Rourke having lunch at Caffe Roma at beverly hills - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Friday 26th February 2016

Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke

Norman Reedus , Mickey Rourke - Premiere Of Open Road's 'Triple 9' at Regal Cinemas L.A. Live - Arrivals at Regal Cinemas L.A. Live - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 16th February 2016

Norman Reedus and Mickey Rourke
Norman Reedus and Mickey Rourke
Norman Reedus and Mickey Rourke
Norman Reedus and Mickey Rourke
Norman Reedus and Mickey Rourke
Norman Reedus

Mickey Rourke Once Told Anna Faris' Baby To Be Quiet On A Plane


Anna Faris Mickey Rourke Chris Pratt

Celebrity bust-up time! Actress Anna Faris has blown off steam about the time Mickey Rourke told her son Jack to be quiet.

When she appeared on Tuesday’s edition of ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live!’, 38 year old Faris told the host that Rourke had shushed her young son on a transatlantic flight from London to Los Angeles back in 2013. Recalling the incident, she said “The longest trip we've ever done is to London to visit Chris when he was shooting Guardians of the Galaxy. It’s a long trip.”

Anna Faris Chris Pratt
Mickey Rourke apparently told Anna Faris and Chris Pratt's son Jack to be quiet on a flight

Continue reading: Mickey Rourke Once Told Anna Faris' Baby To Be Quiet On A Plane

Film Franchises That Go On Forever


Martin Freeman Peter Jackson Ian McKellen Vin Diesel Sylvester Stallone Bruce Willis Harrison Ford Johnny Depp Mickey Rourke

The Hobbit trilogy has been criticised by some viewers for having too little content spread too thinly over the course of too many films. Originally, the idea was to split the 1937 J. R. R. Tolkien story over two films; however, in 2012, director Peter Jackson confirmed his plans for a third film; some six years after the two-film decision had been made.

Peter Jackson
Director of The Hobbit, Peter Jackson, originally thought the franchise would only spread across two films 

Was this to enhance viewers’ experience of the story or was it because three films make more money than two? Audiences will never know. They will instead have to settle with a narrative with a lot less to say than The Lord of the Rings trilogy over the same number of motion pictures; with the final chapter in the piece, The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, released in the UK on 12 December.

Continue reading: Film Franchises That Go On Forever

Immortals Trailer


Immortals follows the epic tale of a blood-thirsty King, Hyperion as his brutal and murderous army travel throughout Greece, destroying everything in their path with a ruthless efficiency. As a string of villages fall to Hyperion's power, the powerful King moves closer to his ultimate goal: to unleash the power of the imprisoned Titans in order that they may triumph over the Gods of Olympus along with the rest of the human race.

Continue: Immortals Trailer

Video - Mickey Rourke Almost Ran Over Photographer


Veteran actor Mickey Rourke (The Expendables; Iron Man 2; The Wrestler) leaves Cafe Roma in Beverly Hills wearing shorts and a leather biker's jacket. He asks the photographers which one of them followed him home, as they very nearly got run over. It turns out that none of them did, which must have come as a relief to the actor. One photographer reveals that she once saw Mickey's underwear while he was having lunch and the actor tells her that his white shorts were particularly short that day.

Mickey can currently be seen in the action film The Immortals. His next project is upcoming thriller The Courier, which will also star Jeffrey Dean Morgan and Til Schweiger. It is set to be released in 2012

Immortals Review


OK
Like 300 on acid, this outrageously violent Greek mythology epic bludgeons us into submission as we become increasingly frustrated by the flaky plot, thin characters and incoherent craziness. But it's so amazingly designed that we can't look away.

Theseus (Cavill) is a peasant being groomed for greatness by the god Zeus (Evans, or Hurt in human guise). And Greece needs him, because the mad King Hyperion (Rourke) is on the rampage looking for the all-powerful Epirus Bow so he can release the imprisoned titans and kill the gods. But Theseus will need the help of virginal seer Phaedra (Pinto) and slave sidekick Stavros (Dorff), because the gods are forbidden from intervening.

Continue reading: Immortals Review

The Expendables Review


OK
Relentlessly loud and bombastic, this old-school thriller is clearly trying to exceed the 1980s action movies it so shamelessly emulates. And Stallone and his fellow potato-faced buddies come very close to doing just this.

Barney (Stallone) is the leader of a ruthless team of mercenaries: knife-wielding Lee (Statham), chop-socky Yin (Li), tattooist Tool (Rourke), hotheaded Gunnar (Lundgren), muscle-gun toting Hale (Crews) and demolition man Toll Road (Couture). Their new mission is to infiltrate the Latin American island of Vilena and overthrow the dictator (Zavas). But he's merely the puppet of a rogue American agent-turned-trafficker (Roberts). He also has a sexy daughter (Itie) to distract the boys. Then there's the issue of Gunnar, who's disgruntled after being thrown off the team.

Continue reading: The Expendables Review

Bruce Willis and Mickey Rourke - Bruce Willis and Mickey Rourke Tuesday 3rd August 2010 at Grauman's Chinese Theatre Los Angeles, California

Bruce Willis and Mickey Rourke
Bruce Willis and Sylvester Stallone
Bruce Willis and Emma Heming
Bruce Willis and Rumer Willis
Sylvester Stallone and Bruce Willis
Bruce Willis and Emma Hemming

Mickey Rourke Friday 2nd July 2010 Mickey Rourke out shopping with girlfriend Anastassija Makarenko in the West Village. New York City, USA

Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke and Girlfriend Anastassija Makarenko Shopping Together In The West Village
Mickey Rourke and Girlfriend Anastassija Makarenko Shopping Together In The West Village
Mickey Rourke and Girlfriend Anastassija Makarenko Shopping Together In The West Village
Mickey Rourke and Girlfriend Anastassija Makarenko Shopping Together In The West Village

Iron Man 2 Review


Very Good
Cast and crew expand this franchise in just about every direction with this hugely enjoyable sequel. It's bigger, louder, funnier, darker and more emotional than before. So much so that you hardly notice how thin and choppy the plot is.

After saving the world, cocky arms-maker Tony Stark (Downey) is riding on his laurels and fending off attacks from his smarmy competitor (Rockwell) and a pushy senator (Shandling). Then a mysterious Russian (Rourke) nearly kills him with technology that matches his own. But Tony has another secret problem: his mechanical heart is killing him. He won't confide in his faithful assistant Pepper (Paltrow) or his best pal Rhodes (Cheadle), but he prepares to leave everything to them. Then the shady Nick Fury (Jackson) offers him another option.

Continue reading: Iron Man 2 Review

The Expendables Trailer


Barney Ross is the leader of a group of mercenary fighters, his team is made up of Lee Christmas, Yin Yang, Hale Caesar, Toll Road and Gunnar Jensen, each member is a specialist in varying areas of destruction and fighting.

Continue: The Expendables Trailer

Mickey Rourke - Mickey Rourke and guest Sunday 21st February 2010 at BAFTA London, England

Mickey Rourke

Iron Man 2 Trailer


Watch the trailer for Iron Man 2.

Continue: Iron Man 2 Trailer

Mickey Rourke Saturday 7th November 2009 shares an intimate moment with a friend Los Angeles, California

Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke

Mickey Rourke Tuesday 8th September 2009 GQ Men Of The Year Awards held at the Royal Opera House. London, England

Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke

Killshot Review


Good
An exceptionally difficult gestation period that spanned many years, many casts, and many studios destined Killshot to the DVD bin, and it's an unfair fate. While there may not be much innovation in this good vs. evil showdown between a crazed killer for hire and a divorcing couple hiding in the witness protection program, the quality of the A-list cast's performances do deserve a tip of the hat.

Based on an Elmore Leonard novel, the story sets half-Indian contract killer Armand "Blackbird" Degas (Mickey Rourke) loose in Detroit, where he puts a bullet into the skull of Hal Holbrook, of all people. When he meets equally dangerous and trigger-happy career criminal Richie Nix (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) in a bar, the two decide to team up to finish off an extortion job Richie has set into motion at a real estate agency. Pay me $20,000, he has told the broker, or I'll burn down your inventory.

Continue reading: Killshot Review

The Informers Review


Bad
The drug-addled zombies lurching through Gregor Jordan's The Informers are relics, dinosaurs from a decadent decade who belong in a museum, not a movie theater. Their destructively self-absorbed attitudes might have shocked audiences in 1983, the year the picture is set. Since then, however, we've spent too much time in the dead zones of Melrose Place, The O.C., and The Hills to be shaken by southern California's over-privileged fraternity.

Like a soap opera, Informers introduces multiple characters and touches on their issues. The nicest ones are stoners, voyeurs, and adulterers. On the flip side, we get kidnappers, drug dealers, and pedophiles.

Continue reading: The Informers Review

Mickey Rourke and Kim Basinger - Mickey Rourke and Kim Basinger Thursday 16th April 2009 at Arclight Theater Hollywood, California

Mickey Rourke and Kim Basinger
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke and Kim Basinger
Mickey Rourke and Kim Basinger
Mickey Rourke

Mickey Rourke Saturday 11th April 2009 Mickey Rourke leaving a Hollywood nightclub carrying a string of jade prayer beads Los Angeles, California

Mickey Rourke
Mickey Rourke

Mickey Rourke, Vanity Fair and Academy Awards Sunday 22nd February 2009 The 81st Annual Academy Awards (Oscars) - Vanity Fair Party Hollywood, California

Mickey Rourke, Vanity Fair and Academy Awards

The Wrestler Review


Extraordinary
For those who have been following Darren Aronofsky's career since he broke out in 2000 with Requiem for a Dream, his latest work, The Wrestler, might very well come as a bit of a shock. Unlike Requiem and 2006's The Fountain, the film does not garner its power from hyperactive editing (the former) nor grandiose flourishes of the patently ludicrous (the latter). Shot in grainy 16mm by the estimable Maryse Alberti, a cinematographer who has spent the last few years shooting documentaries, The Wrestler realigns Aronofsky as a director concerned with the slow burn of American neo-realism more than hyperactive pseudo-transcendentalism.

It is also the resurrection, renovation, and reinvention of Mickey Rourke in the King Lear of self-reflexive roles. Walking hunched with his long strands of bleached-blonde hair covering his face until he puts it up under a hairnet, revealing an unsightly hearing aid, Rourke's Randy "The Ram" Robinson, an aging legend of the 1980s pro-wrestling boom, walks like a grand warrior just starting to get used to the knife in his back after years of minor shows as a nostalgic draw. After suffering a heart attack, Randy declines an upcoming rematch with his erstwhile nemesis The Ayatollah and tries to clean himself up, taking a weekend shift at the local deli counter, ensuring that his landlord won't evict him from his trailer.

Continue reading: The Wrestler Review

Mickey Rourke and AFI - Thursday 6th November 2008 at Grauman's Chinese Theatre Hollywood, California

Mickey Rourke and Afi
Mickey Rourke and Afi
Mickey Rourke and Afi
Mickey Rourke and Afi
Mickey Rourke and Afi
Mickey Rourke and Afi

Mickey Rourke - Wednesday 10th September 2008 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Mickey Rourke

Mickey Rourke and Guest - Mickey Rourke, Guest Miami, Florida - 944 Miami magazine one year anniversary - Arrivals Saturday 10th May 2008

Mickey Rourke and Guest

Nine 1/2 Weeks Review


Excellent
I have no idea what Nine 1/2 Weeks is supposed to be about. I do know this: Basinger is hot, naked, and covered in food. Sounds ridiculous, but hey, this movie is based on a novel written by a woman.

Angel Heart Review


Good
A decade before Hollywood got obsessed with urban volcanoes, asteroid impacts, and Steve Prefontaine -- offering us multiple movies about each topic -- the Big Bastardized Theme of the year was an inexplicable one: Voodoo. In 1987-88, three major voodoo-themed movies came out, including Angel Heart, The Serpent and the Rainbow, and The Believers. Each was tackled by a major director, and none of them made a huge splash critically or commercially. In fact, they all made pretty much the same amount at the box office -- slightly under $20 million.

So put aside your quizzical concern over why Angel Heart merits a special edition DVD (Robert De Niro's performance alone is worth it), and dig back into this quirky project from yesteryear, when we were all scared to death that a cowrie shell or a chicken claw was going to cause bugs to start crawling out of our face. Angel Heart (based on the novel Fallen Angel) is a 1950s period piece and starts out simply enough: An eccentric, sharp-fingernailed man named Louis Cyphre (De Niro) hires private eye Harry Angel (Mickey Rourke) to track down a missing person with whom Cyphre has an old (and unhonored) contract. Rourke's investigation takes him into the seedy underbelly of New Orleans and the Louisiana swamp. Virtually every one Angel speaks to turns up dead within days, but he plows ahead anyway. In the end he hooks up with a young voodoo priestess (Lisa Bonet when she had a career), and, well, the whole thing gets a little kooky. It's hard to write much about the utlimate resolution of Angel Heart without giving too much away, but suffice it to say it's at once obvious and surprising, considering the very thinly-veiled dialogue and unsubtle imagery.

Continue reading: Angel Heart Review

Animal Factory Review


Very Good
Dear Ma,

After seeing Steve Buscemi's sophomore directorial effort, Animal Factory (following 1996's Trees Lounge), I nearly reconsidered choosing film criticism as a career path. For the first hour of this film, it seemed the way to go was to become a convict. (By the way, ma, they don't call 'em inmates in the pen, they call 'em convicts.)

Continue reading: Animal Factory Review

The Pledge Review


Excellent
An early note to parents with young, blonde daughters: Think twice about seeing The Pledge, and if you must go -- if you're eager to see Jack Nicholson give one of his best cinematic performances ever -- then take a Valium before entering the theater and practice saying, "This won't happen to my family! This won't happen to my family!"

From the opening shot, where we see the top of Nicholson's half-bald, hair-transplanted head, The Pledge is an exercise in stomaching an ugly truth. Body parts, pony-tailed girls splotched with blood and bruises -- this isn't a film about happy endings and human triumph. Suspected sex perverts lurk down every road in The Pledge, causing Nicholson's character, a retired homicide detective, so much angst that he becomes his own worst enemy.

Continue reading: The Pledge Review

Masked & Anonymous Review


Bad
Masked & Anonymous, as a title, comes across as a vague, artsy moniker as inaccessible as the film it represents. But look closer at the name of this movie about revolution and despair, and you'll discover a clear reference to the film's writers; credited as Rene Fontaine and Sergei Petrov, the screenwriters have been unmasked, as it were, revealed to be the film's iconic star, Bob Dylan, and director Larry Charles (HBO's Curb Your Enthusiasm).

The result of this combination is an overly ambitious film that's as muddled and cryptic as a mumble-filled Dylan vocal. Dylan stars as the symbolically named Jack Fate, an apparent musical legend, jailed in the midst of a brutally downtrodden America where the government has taken over, war is rampant, and even the counter-revolutionaries have counter-revolutionaries.

Continue reading: Masked & Anonymous Review

Nine 1/2 Weeks Review


Excellent
I have no idea what Nine 1/2 Weeks is supposed to be about. I do know this: Basinger is hot, naked, and covered in food. Sounds ridiculous, but hey, this movie is based on a novel written by a woman.

Man On Fire (2004) Review


Good
An overstuffed, pricey, and smashingly gorgeous bag for a variety pack of clichés, Man on Fire represents director Tony Scott taking somewhat of a step backwards after fun, spry thrillers Spy Game and Enemy of the State; but damn if he doesn't try his hardest to make it all mean something.

In the film (a remake of a 1987 flick of the same name) Denzel Washington coasts through his role as John Creasy, your average ex-undercover operative now saddled with a drinking problem and a yen for his own death. His buddy from the bad old days, Rayburn (Christopher Walken), now a wealthy Mexican businessman of ill repute, gets Creasy a job as bodyguard for the nine-year-old daughter of Mexico City industrialist Samuel Ramos (Marc Anthony). The average parent might have noticed that Creasy might not have been the best man for the job, seeing as he drinks, is temperamental with the daughter, and tries to off himself one lonely night. But the girl herself, Pita (Dakota Fanning), takes to crusty old Creasy anyway, saying to her mother (Radha Mitchell) that "he's like a big, sad bear" and filling her notebook with moony scribblings about how much she loves him. Creasy finally warms up to Pita, an irresistibly personable ball of energy as played by Fanning, who also brings a powerfully adult presence to her scenes with Washington, complementing his character's world-weariness: they're like the only two adults in a world full of corrupt, venal teenagers.

Continue reading: Man On Fire (2004) Review

The Last Outlaw Review


Bad
Whoa, Steve Buscemi in a western? With Mickey Rourke, too!? Sadly, crazy casting is just about the only thing of note in The Last Outlaw, a sad, sad excuse for a western. After a botched bank robbery, the film quickly degenerates into one long bloodbath, with the bad guys being killed by each other and/or the law. In the end, only one will survive? Which one? Who cares.

Buffalo '66 Review


Very Good
Curious, but highly experimental film by actor/writer/director/composer Gallo in his writing/directing/composing debut. The story of a guy who returns home (from prison) to Buffalo is touching and bizarre, with equal emphasis on both.

Diner Review


Excellent
Six guys try to make sense of their lives before one of them is married. But why would anyone want to marry Steve Guttenberg (in the only good role of his life, I think)? Witty and fun.

Barfly Review


Excellent
Charles Bukowski's "crazy, beer-drinkin' wrestler" comes to life in the inimitable hands of Mickey Rourke, seen here with a nearly unidentifiable Faye Dunaway as his equally rundown muse. They drink, fight, steal corn, and drink some more. And that, director Barbet Schroeder, is life. Or some imitation of it, anyway. Rourke's performance has become the stuff of legend as he appears genuinely trashed throughout shooting, yet manages to blow none of his lines. Impressive.

Sin City Review


Good
Innovative and dazzling in its absolute loyalty to thevisual style of its inspiration, "Sin City" brings comic bookpages alive to a degree that is unprecedented in movie history.

A triptych of dark, violent tales set in a fallen cityof corruption and grime, the film is a collaboration between film directorRobert Rodriguez (of "Desperado" and "SpyKids" fame) and graphic novelist FrankMiller (responsible for the gritty reinventions of Batman and Daredevil),whose unique touch in the unusual role of co-director is unmistakable.

Pages from the "Sin City" books were clearlyused as storyboards for the stunning, stark black-and-white cinematography,which features exclamation points of illustrative color: the golden tressesof a beautiful femme fatale, white-on-black silhouettes, red splashes ofblood from brutal murders that occur just out of frame.

His influence can also be felt (along with that of Rodriguezpal Quentin Tarantino, who is curiously credited as a "special guestdirector") in the "Pulp Fiction"-like plot structure thatlends itself well to the interconnected short stories, each of which makeup in atmosphere what they sometimes lack in profundity.

Continue reading: Sin City Review

Spun Review


OK

An entertaining but hideous romp on the circus side of crystal meth addiction, "Spun" wants to be another "Trainspotting" and/or "Requiem for a Dream." Inundated with trip-cam trickery that keeps the audience riding the ups and downs of the main character's drug buzzes, the film is nothing if not stylish, but falls short for lack of depth.

Music video guru and first-time feature director Jonas Akerlund makes liberal use of the disorienting, grainy, washed-out look of bleach-bypass photography. When Ross -- a downward-spiraling college dropout (played by Jason Schwartzman of "Rushmore" fame) on the leading edge of addiction but still clinging to his letter-jacket memories -- takes a hit of speed, the movie's tempo is fed a brief burst of shaky acceleration. A rapid montage of sensory-assault, nervous-tension images dance across the screen, sometimes in the form of cinematic hyper-awareness (e.g., fish-eye lens ultra-close-ups of chapped lips, bloodshot eyes and nervous-ticking fingers), sometimes in the form of animated, soddenly pornographic hallucinations.

The world of "Spun" is an acutely realized day-lit underground of ghetto shacks and combustible meth labs in cheap, airless hotel rooms (greatly enhanced by a hip-trippy score from the Smashing Pumpkin's Billy Corgan) in which all the characters seem acquiescently ensnared.

Continue reading: Spun Review

Once Upon A Time In Mexico Review


Weak

"Desperado," the second eye-poppingly stylish and unabashedly outlandish B-movie in Robert Rodriguez's "El Mariachi" shoot-'em-up trilogy, is one of my all-time favorite action movies, in part because it has its priorities straight: The plot was simple -- a nameless mariachi avenges his girlfriend's murder with a guitar case full of semi-automatic weapons and an endless supply of ammunition -- and the action was non-stop and over-the-top.

Antonio Banderas cut an imposing, mysterious, hell-bent, dangerous and dead sexy figure in his long hair, implacable glower and black suede bandito get-up -- complete with jangling spurs -- as he performed a limber slow-motion ballet of body-twisting, two-fisted gunfire while dodging hails of bullets from evil drug-runners. And all this was set to a steamy, dynamic south-of-the-border score by the great guitaristas of Los Lobos.

But in the new installment, "Once Upon a Time in Mexico," writer-director-editor-composer Rodriguez pollutes the action -- which is uncharacteristically erratic, incongruous and over-edited -- with a needlessly convoluted plot involving 1) a thorny coup attempt against the Mexican president backed by a cartel kingpin (Willem Dafoe) and his turncoat henchman (Mickey Rourke), 2) a crooked and borderline-loco CIA agent (Johnny Depp) playing both sides against the middle, 3) a former FBI agent (Ruben Blades) frustrated with not nailing the kingpin before his retirement, 4) a curvaceous, gung-ho greenhorn federale (Eva Mendez) with ulterior motives, and 5) yet another murder, played out in fantasized-action flashbacks, that the mariachi is out to avenge.

Continue reading: Once Upon A Time In Mexico Review

Man On Fire Review


OK

Remove the potent dramatic anchoring effect of Denzel Washington in the title role -- as a guilt-ridden bodyguard reaping retribution on the kidnappers of his young charge -- and "Man On Fire" could have easily deteriorated into the apathetic, stone-faced overkill of a Steven Seagal action movie.

A brooding, violent tragedy about a former assassin who had given up on redemption and resigned himself to the bottle before taking a job in Mexico City guarding a millionaire's daughter, it's a film elevated above archetype by its star's profound, understated depth and by director Tony Scott's determination to take his time giving the story a character-driven soul.

Almost the entire first half of the picture, while underscored with danger and tension, is about the complex devotion that forms slowly (and reluctantly on his part) between CIA washout John Creasy (Washington) and inquisitive, fiercely intelligent, 8-year-old Pita Ramos (the preternaturally talented Dakota Fanning). A sweet little girl with a keen sense of the world around her, she converses with Creasey as her equal and knows enough about daily kidnappings in Mexico City to recognize that when the bodyguard asks her for a pencil while driving her to school, it's to write down the license number of a car tailing them.

Continue reading: Man On Fire Review

The Pledge Review


Weak

Director Sean Penn and star Jack Nicholson must have been drawn to the complexity of the haunted ex-detective character at the center of "The Pledge," because he's just about the only thing at all uncommon in this largely conventional serial killer suspense flick.

Although, even calling him uncommon is a stretch. Reno homicide dick Jerry Black is pretty much an assembly-line character -- a freshly retired cop obsessed with finding the "real killer" in an officially closed murder case that was his last assignment. Having made a promise to the parents of the dead little girl, he's still following hunches on his own time because nobody in the precinct believes him.

Doesn't Jerry sound like a regulation Morgan Freeman character? But with Nicholson in the role, he's a bit more of a wildcard. Big Jack brings an element of instability to Jerry that leaves the audience concerned for his sanity when his ostensive retirement finds him buying a gas station at a High Sierra crossroads as his nest egg because it's at the center of a geographic pattern he's discovered for his suspect.

Continue reading: The Pledge Review

Get Carter Review


OK

If the rain-slicked new Sylvester Stallone revenge fantasy flick "Get Carter" seems a little familiar, it's with good reason.

It could be that the picture is a remake of a gnarly 1971 film of the same name (starring Michael Caine, who appears in this one too).

It could be that the bad-guy-going-after-worse-guys plot -- about a Las Vegas mob enforcer determined to find and snuff the people who whacked his estranged brother -- isn't all that different from the story of a hard-as-nails parolee avenging his daughter in last year's "The Limey."

Continue reading: Get Carter Review

Mickey Rourke

Mickey Rourke Quick Links

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Mickey Rourke

Date of birth

16th September, 1952

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.80


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Mickey Rourke Movies

Ashby Trailer

Ashby Trailer

Ed Wallis has never really been the popular boy in his class and the thought...

Black November Movie Review

Black November Movie Review

Nigerian filmmaker Jeta Amata clearly feels passionate about the problems in his country, but despite...

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For Movie Review

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For Movie Review

It's taken nearly 10 years for filmmaker Robert Rodriguez and graphic novelist Frank Miller to...

Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For Trailer

Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For Trailer

It's all about revenge in Sin City now as the wounded (both physically and mentally)...

Generation Iron Trailer

Generation Iron Trailer

Mr. Olympia is one of the most prestigious international bodybuilding titles in the world, awarded...

Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Trailer

Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Trailer

The everlasting trail of violence, death and deceit continues with the return of several characters...

I Am Bruce Lee Movie Review

I Am Bruce Lee Movie Review

Comprehensively documenting Bruce Lee's life, work and philosophy, this engaging doc is packed with terrific...

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Immortals Trailer

Immortals Trailer

Immortals follows the epic tale of a blood-thirsty King, Hyperion as his brutal and murderous...

Immortals Movie Review

Immortals Movie Review

Like 300 on acid, this outrageously violent Greek mythology epic bludgeons us into submission as...

13 Trailer

13 Trailer

Vince Ferro is badly in need of money to support his family. His only source...

The Expendables Movie Review

The Expendables Movie Review

Relentlessly loud and bombastic, this old-school thriller is clearly trying to exceed the 1980s action...

Iron Man 2 Movie Review

Iron Man 2 Movie Review

Cast and crew expand this franchise in just about every direction with this hugely enjoyable...

The Expendables Trailer

The Expendables Trailer

Barney Ross is the leader of a group of mercenary fighters, his team is made...

Iron Man 2 Trailer

Iron Man 2 Trailer

Watch the trailer for Iron Man 2.Picking up where the first film left us, the...

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