Michelle Yeoh

Michelle Yeoh

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Walkabout Foundation's Inaugural Gala - Arrivals

Michelle Yeoh - Walkabout Foundation's Inaugural Gala held at the Natural History Museum - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Saturday 27th June 2015

Michelle Yeoh
Michelle Yeoh
Michelle Yeoh
Michelle Yeoh
Michelle Yeoh

Netflix Announces First Original Movie With ‘Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon’ Sequel


Netflix Michelle Yeoh Ang Lee

Netflix are teaming up with the Weinstein Company to produce the sequel to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon titled, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon II: The Green Destiny. For the first time ever, the movie will be released simultaneously online and in IMAX cinemas, next August.

Michelle YeohCrouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon 's Michelle Yeoh

The film marks Netflix’s first foray into movie making after the success of original series' such as ‘House of Cards’ and ‘Orange is the New Black’. The sequel to Ang Lee’s 2000 Academy Award nominee will this time see Woo-ping Yuen behind the camera, while former Bond actress Michelle Yeoh return in the role of Yu Shu Lien.

Continue reading: Netflix Announces First Original Movie With ‘Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon’ Sequel

FIA Gala and prize giving event

JeanTodt and Michelle Yeoh - FIA Gala and prize giving event for champions in motorsport - Arrivals - Paris, France - Friday 6th December 2013

JeanTodt and Michelle Yeoh
JeanTodt and Michelle Yeoh

Oktoberfest 2013

Michelle Yeoh and Jean Todt - Munich Oktoberfest at the Hippodrom beer hall - Munich, BAVARIA, Germany - Tuesday 1st October 2013

Michelle Yeoh and Jean Todt
Michelle Yeoh and Jean Todt

SSIF - Culinary Zinema - Premiere

Michelle Yeoh - 61st San Sebastian International Film Festival - Culinary Zinema - Premiere - San Sebastian, Spain - Saturday 21st September 2013

Michelle Yeoh
Michelle Yeoh
Michelle Yeoh
Michelle Yeoh
Michelle Yeoh

Picture - Dominic Cooper, Gyalwang Drukpa, Michelle... , Friday 16th March 2012

Dominic Cooper, Michelle Yeoh and BAFTA - Dominic Cooper, Gyalwang Drukpa, Michelle Yeoh Friday 16th March 2012 Pad Yatra: A Green Odyssey - gala screening held at

Dominic Cooper, Michelle Yeoh and Bafta

The Lady Trailer


Aung San Suu Kyi, born in Burma, watched her father die when she was three years old. Her father had lead Burma into independence from the British empire in 1947, as well as founding the modern Burmese army. But in that same year, he was assassinated by his rivals.

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The Lady Review


Good
The inspirational story of Aung San Suu Kyi comes to the big screen in the unlikely hands of Luc Besson, better known for mindless action like Taken and The Transporter. This is an emotionally involving film, with terrific central performances.

As daughter of Aung San, founder of independent Burma, Suu (Yeoh) has a place in her nation's heart. She lives in Britain with her Oxford-professor husband Michael (Thewlis) and their sons (Raggett and Woodhouse), and when she returns home to care for her ailing mother, she gets involved in the pro-democracy movement. This terrifies the military junta that rules with an iron fist, so they put her under house arrest just before the 1990 election that her party won in a landslide. Then the military refuses to cede power.

Continue reading: The Lady Review

Kung Fu Panda 2 Review


Good
Jack Black's cuddly alter-ego is back for another epic adventure in this lively, colourful sequel. It pretty much has the same plot as the final act of the 2008 original, and it's not quite as funny, but it's beautifully animated and thoroughly engaging.

Now that Dragon Warrior panda Po (voiced by Black) has joined the Furious Five (Jolie's tigress, Rogen's mantis, Chan's monkey, Liu's viper and Cross' crane), there's peace in the valley again. But in a distant kingdom, the villainous peacock Lord Shen (Oldman) has developed a secret weapon with which he plans to take over China and put an end to kung fu. Although he's been rattled for decades, since his soothsayer (Yeoh) told him he'll be conquered by a panda.

And he knows the Dragon Warrior is on his way.

Continue reading: Kung Fu Panda 2 Review

Kung Fu Panda 2: The Kaboom of Doom Trailer


What more can come for the Panda who has it all? Since gaining the respect of his heroes - Master Shifu and the furious five - and defeating the evil snow leopard Tai Lung, Po's life in the Valley of Peace is perfect but it isn't to last.

Continue: Kung Fu Panda 2: The Kaboom of Doom Trailer

The Karate Kid Review


OK
Even though it's corny, unnecessary and far too long, this remake of the 1984 hit is surprisingly engaging. This is mainly due to the crowd-pleasing story and a relatively understated performance from Jackie Chan.

Dre (Smith) is annoyed when his mother (Henson) moves from Detroit to Beijing, where he's mercilessly bullied by a gang of schoolboy thugs led by Cheng (Wang Zhenwei). Sure, there's the cute violinist (Han) to distract him, but things don't really start looking up until the maintenance man (Chan) agrees to teach him kung fu. Now Dre has three goals: learn skills to defend himself, compete in an upcoming tournament against Cheng and his evil mentor (Yu), and of course get the girl.

Continue reading: The Karate Kid Review

Babylon A.D. Review


Unbearable
In the movie critic handbook (yep, we all get one), there are certain assured signs that a movie is going to tank and tank hard. Sometimes, all it takes is a name over a marquee (Rob Schneider!). In other instances, the format (mindless Movie lampoon) foreshadows the flop sweat. Perhaps the surest indication of some certified crap comes from the studio itself. When they fail to screen a film before it opens, even cancelling pre-planned previews to avoid that deadliest of PR pariahs (bad word of mouth), you know you're in trouble. After the 90 soulless minutes that make up Mathieu Kassovitz's Babylon A.D., you'll never doubt that tome again.

Toorop (Vin Diesel) is a mercenary hired by an old ally, Gorsky (Gerard Depardieu) to transport a young girl named Aurora (Mélanie Thierry) from Eastern Europe to New York City. In the violent, dystopic world which is the future, she needs someone with Toorop's skills as a smuggler. Along with Sister Rebeka (Michelle Yeoh), the trio must traverse crowded train depots, perilous border checkpoints, a trip aboard an old Soviet sub, and a snowmobile ride across a security drone-policed arctic tundra. Once they arrive in America, Toorop finally discovers the purpose of his mission. Aurora is either carrying a deadly disease... or the new messiah. In either case, the evil High Priestess (Charlotte Rampling) will stop at nothing to get her hands on them.

Continue reading: Babylon A.D. Review

The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor Review


Terrible
In the classic movie monster hierarchy, the cloth-clad Mummy really scrapes the bottom of the scare barrel. Aside from his close kinship with the zombie -- sadly, this is one Egyptian artifact that avoids the mandatory skin eating -- there's really nothing inherently spooky about a reanimated corpse with limited super(natural) powers. This is especially true of the sarcophagus' latest big screen incarnation. In Rob Cohen's horrid The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor, our wrapped rascal is literally as menacing as an inert stone statue.

Ever since the end of WWII, the rough riding O'Connell Family -- Rick (Brendan Fraser), Evelyn (Maria Bello, subbing for Rachael Weisz), and college age son Alex (Luke Ford) -- have been in semi-retirement. Gone are the days when they would circumnavigate the globe looking for ancient treasure and kicking antiquated butt. When they get the chance to return a precious diamond to the people of China, they jump at the chance. Unfortunately, the gem is instrumental in the resurrection of the evil Emperor Han (Jet Li), a ruthless tyrant bent on conquering the world. Luckily, an ancient witch (Michelle Yeoh) has cursed him to an eternity embedded in rock. Of course, it won't be long before our haphazard adventurers have him up and around -- and seeking immortality via his massive terra cotta army.

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Babylon A.D Trailer


Watch the trailer for Babylon A.D.

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The Children of Huang Shi Review


Terrible
Roger Spottiswoode's limp The Children of Huang Shi sounds, looks, and feels like a chapter torn from a dusty history textbook that was relevant somewhere in the mid-1960s. Every revelation feels like a lesson being thrust upon the viewer, every character a simple metaphor for their nationality's opinion toward (and hand in) the Japanese occupation of China that culminated in the Rape of Nanking in the winter of 1937. Here, the Chinese were honorable soldiers from a conflicted country, the Japanese were buffoonish barbarians who still took their shirt off before they decapitated people, the British were naive and in way over their heads, and the Americans just wanted to get married.

As the film's pre-script enlightens us, Children follows the life of George Hogg (Jonathan Rhys Davies), a British journalist who steals the identity of a Red Cross worker to sneak into Nanking and get the story and the pictures of the massacres. After being captured, he almost meets the business-end of Tokyo steel before Hansheng (Chow Yun-Fat, not having fun with a mostly-American dialect), a resistance fighter, saves him from the blade. Hansheng sends Hogg off to the titular village, which serves as a sort of city for lost children, held in check by Dr. Pearson (Radha Mitchell), an actual Red Cross medic.

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Michelle Yeoh

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