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Murder On The Orient Express Trailer


It's the 1930s and a group of strangers from different walks of life board a crowded luxury train called the Orient Express in Istanbul, preparing for a long overnight journey to their destination. Among them is the world famous detective Hercule Poirot who certainly isn't expecting to be working in such circumstances, but when a passenger named Edward Ratchett is found havng been brutally murdered in his sleep on the second night, it's up to him to gather all available evidence and wheedle out all of the suspects. So who are they? He soon deduces that the potential killer could be one of eleven including Professor Gerhard Hardman, Edward Masterman the Butler, Count Andrenyi, Hector MacQueen the Assistant, Mary Debenham the Governess, Pilar Estravados the Missionary, Mrs. Hubbard the Widow, Marquez the Salesman, Hildegarde Schmidt the Maid, Doctor Arbuthnot or Princess Dragomiroff. 

Continue: Murder On The Orient Express Trailer

David E. Kelley and Michelle Pfeiffer - Celebrities attend The Television Academy's 23rd Annual Hall of Fame event at The Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 11th March 2014

David E. Kelley and Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer
David E. Kelley and Michelle Pfeiffer
David E. Kelley and Michelle Pfeiffer
David E. Kelley and Michelle Pfeiffer
David E. Kelley and Michelle Pfeiffer

Michelle Pfeiffer Led Cult-Like Lifestyle As Young Actress In L.A.


Michelle Pfeiffer Robert De Niro Joaquin Phoenix River Phoenix John Travolta Leah Remini

Michelle Pfeiffer admitted to being in a cult when she was younger. The 55-year-old actress discussed her involvement with an unusual couple which led to her involvement into a cult called breatharianism. This involved abstaining from drinking or eating as they believe it food and drink are not necessary to live.

Michelle PfeifferMichelle Pfeiffer discussed her cult-like lifestyle in a magazine article promoting her latest film, The Family.

The Batman actress spoke to The Sunday Telegraph's Stella magazine (published on 3rd November) about her youthful involvement in the cult. Pfieffer described how, after leaving home at the age of 20, she became involved with a "very controlling" couple when she arrived in Los Angeles. She described the couple as "kind of personal trainers" who placed her on an extreme diet, breatharianism, which "nobody can adhere to."

Continue reading: Michelle Pfeiffer Led Cult-Like Lifestyle As Young Actress In L.A.

Dianna Agron, Luc Besson, Virginie Silla, Michelle Pfeiffer, Robert De Niro and Lenny Kravitz - The French premiere of 'Malavita' Premiere at Aeroville - Roissy En France, France - Wednesday 16th October 2013

Dianna Agron, Luc Besson, Virginie Silla, Michelle Pfeiffer, Robert De Niro and Lenny Kravitz
Dianna Agron, Luc Besson, Virginie Silla, Michelle Pfeiffer, Robert De Niro and Lenny Kravitz
Dianna Agron and Michelle Pfeiffer

'The Family': Who Says Robert De Niro Doesn't Make Good Movies Anymore?


Robert De Niro Michelle Pfeiffer Luc Besson

Thinking of heading to the theater this weekend to catch a new release? Well, as the major studios prepare their premium Oscar-bait for the November and December release dates, there isn't a whole lot to choose from. Still, Luc Besson's new comedy The Family - starring Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer and executive produced by Martin Scorsese - should satisfy family crowds not keen on seeing another Insidious movie.

Robert De NiroRobert De Niro Means Business In 'The Family'

The off-beat movie follows a mafia boss and his family who relocate to a sleepy town in France under the witness protection program after snitching on the mob. Despite the best efforts of Tommy Lee Jones's Agent Stansfield, the family can't help but revert to its old ways and eventually get tracked down by a couple of former mafia cronies. Of course, chaos ensues in the most unlikely of settings.

Continue reading: 'The Family': Who Says Robert De Niro Doesn't Make Good Movies Anymore?

Michelle Pfeiffer - New York premiere of 'The Family' held at AMC Loews Lincoln Square - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 10th September 2013

Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer and David E. Kelley
Michelle Pfeiffer
Grace Hightower, Robert De Niro, John D' Leo, Dianna Agron and Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer and Jimmy Palumbo

Robert De Niro Stars In Mobster-Comedy 'The Family' [Trailer And Pictures]


Robert De Niro Luc Besson Dianna Agron John D'Leo Michelle Pfeiffer

John D'Leo, Michelle Pfeiffer and Dianna Agron in 'The Family'
John D'Leo, Michelle Pfeiffer and Dianna Agron in 'The Family'

From director Luc Besson (Taken, Léon) comes a new gangster movieThe Family- only this time Besson has made a black comedy. The Family stars Hollywood heavyweights Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer as a husband and wife duo. The pair co-starred together in 2007's Stardust but hadn't actually 'performed' together until now.

The plot follows the Manzoni family, led by patriarchal Giovanni (De Niro), who are placed under witness protection after snitching on the mafia. After the mafia turn on him, wanting him dead, Giovanni's family are moved en masse from Brooklyn to Normandy in France reinventing themselves as 'the Blakes' but encounter difficulties when trying to fit in.

Continue reading: Robert De Niro Stars In Mobster-Comedy 'The Family' [Trailer And Pictures]

The Family Trailer


Giovanni Manzoni is a gangster boss who has been placed under witness protection by Agent Stansfield after betraying the mafia. However, wherever they are relocated and whatever names they are given, they always manage to get themselves into trouble as blending in to their new towns becomes more and more difficult. With their lives under threat from their old pals again, the Manzonis are moved to Normandy in France where they become the 'Blakes'. Unfortunately, they have barely moved one day before the family manage to create chaos yet again, with Mrs Blake blowing up a convenience store in response to a snide comment from the French shopkeeper, the daughter getting into numerous fights and the son in trouble at school for theft and bribery. As expected, they manage to attract attention from the mob and they are forced to fight back to protect themselves in the only way they know how.

Continue: The Family Trailer

People Like Us Review


Good

There's an intriguing true story buried inside this overly structured drama, and by playing by simplistic screenwriting rules the filmmakers make everything trite and predictable. Fortunately, the cast is much better than the material, and they bring their characters to life with jaggedly engaging interaction and some resonant emotion.

The story centres on Sam (Pine), a fast-talking New York salesman who is in big trouble professionally. So when his estranged father dies in Los Angeles, it gives him a chance to escape. He heads off to see his mother (Pfeiffer) and find out what he has inherited. But the lawyers hand him a bag of cash that he has to give to smart 11-year-old Josh (D'Addario), whose barmaid mother Frankie (Banks) is the half-sister Sam never knew he had. Without revealing his identity, he worms his way into Frankie and Josh's life. But the Feds are catching up with him, and Frankie is about to learn who he really is.

This is one of those films that hinges completely on the characters' inability to talk to each other. So one honest conversation at the beginning would make this a very short movie! But no, the screenwriters force everything into an unnatural formula that completely undermines the genuinely interesting things going on. Even so, the actors manage to hold our interest, mainly due to some terrific chemistry. At the centre, Pine nicely holds his own in scenes with the wonderful Pfeiffer and Banks, while D'Addario proves to be a young actor to keep an eye on. Meanwhile, side characters add texture, most notably Duplass as a neighbour with the hots for Frankie, and Wilde as Sam's frazzled girlfriend.

Continue reading: People Like Us Review

Michelle Pfeiffer - DeeDee Pfeiffer, Michelle Pfeiffer Saturday 27th October 2012 arrives at "The Pink Party '12" at Hanger 8

Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer and David E. Kelley
Michelle Pfeiffer

Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival Friday 15th June 2012 2012 Los Angeles Film Festival premiere of 'People Like Us' at Regal Cinemas L.A. LIVE Stadium - Arrivals

Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival
Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival
Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival
Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival

Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival Friday 15th June 2012 2012 Los Angeles Film Festival premiere of 'People Like Us' at Regal Cinemas L.A. LIVE Stadium

Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival
Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival
Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival
Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival
Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival
Michelle Pfeiffer and Los Angeles Film Festival

People Like Us Trailer


Sam is a successful salesman in his twenties who is dire need of a plan after he loses an $84,000 sale to debt. The loss comes at the same time he is informed of his estranged record producing father's sudden death. After reluctantly flying home to LA for the funeral, he is informed that his father left him $150,000 that he must deliver to his long lost sister Frankie who he never knew even existed, and her difficult pre-teen son Josh. Sam develops a close bond with Frankie and Josh and is shocked to learn that his father left Frankie's mother to be with his own mother.

Continue: People Like Us Trailer

Dark Shadows Review


OK
There were 1,245 episodes of the gothic soap Dark Shadows between 1966 and 1971, so adapting it into a movie was never going to be easy. The script is an odd mix of smart dialog and random plot-strands, and while Burton gets the style right he never quite finds the tone.

After spending nearly 200 years trapped in a coffin, Barnabas Collins (Depp) is released to rejoin what's left of his wealthy New England family in 1972. The matriarch Elizabeth (Pfeiffer) now lives in the falling-down manor Collinswood with her brother Roger (Miller), her daughter (Moretz) and his son (McGrath), as well as a live-in shrink (Bonham Carter), a caretaker (Haley) and a new governess (Heathcote). But Angelique (Green), the witch who turned Barnabas into a vampire, is still trying to destroy the family.

Continue reading: Dark Shadows Review

Michelle Pfeiffer and Empire Cinema Wednesday 9th May 2012 UK premiere of 'Dark Shadows' at The Empire Cinema - Arrivals

Michelle Pfeiffer and Empire Cinema
Michelle Pfeiffer and Empire Cinema
Michelle Pfeiffer and Empire Cinema
Michelle Pfeiffer and Empire Cinema
Michelle Pfeiffer and Empire Cinema
Michelle Pfeiffer and Empire Cinema

Michelle Pfeiffer, The Shadows and Empire Leicester Square Wednesday 9th May 2012 Michelle Pfeiffer at the premiere of Dark Shadows at Empire, Leicester Square, London, England

Michelle Pfeiffer, The Shadows and Empire Leicester Square
Michelle Pfeiffer, The Shadows and Empire Leicester Square
Michelle Pfeiffer, The Shadows and Empire Leicester Square
Michelle Pfeiffer, The Shadows and Empire Leicester Square
Michelle Pfeiffer, The Shadows and Empire Leicester Square

Michelle Pfeiffer and Empire Cinema Saturday 9th June 2012 UK premiere of 'Dark Shadows' at The Empire Cinema - Arrivals

Michelle Pfeiffer and Empire Cinema
Michelle Pfeiffer and Empire Cinema

Michelle Pfeiffer and Grauman's Chinese Theatre Monday 7th May 2012 'Dark Shadows' premiere at Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Arrivals

Michelle Pfeiffer and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Cloris Leachman, Michelle Pfeiffer and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Cloris Leachman, Michelle Pfeiffer and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Cloris Leachman, Michelle Pfeiffer and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Cloris Leachman, Michelle Pfeiffer and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Cloris Leachman, Michelle Pfeiffer and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

New Year's Eve Review


Terrible
The team that made the thin-but-enjoyable Valentine's Day in 2010 reunites for another massively overextended rom-com with a remarkable A-list ensemble. But this time the stories and filmmaking overdose on ill-conceived schmaltz.

As the countdown to 2012 begins, an executive (Swank) is frazzled about a technical glitch in the iconic Time's Square ball-drop. Meanwhile, a courier (Efron) is trying to help a frumpy secretary (Pfeiffer) achieve her dreams. A chef (Heigl) is catering a glittering event while trying to avoid her rock star ex (Bon Jovi), whose back-up singer (Michele) is stuck in a lift with a lovelorn slacker (Kutcher). A mother (Parker) is worried about her teen daughter (Breslin). And a tuxedoed millionaire (Duhamel) is trying to get to an important event in the city.

Continue reading: New Year's Eve Review

Dark Shadows Trailer


In 1752, The Collins family moves from Liverpool for a new life in North America. Barnabas, the son of the family, grows up and soon earns a reputation as a playboy. One day, his antics break the heart of a young woman, Angelique. She reveals her true nature to Barnabas - she is really a witch! She curses Barnabas and turns him into a vampire, burying him alive.

Continue: Dark Shadows Trailer

Video - Michelle Pfeiffer And Sarah Jessica Parker Bring Husbands Along To Premiere - New Year's Eve New York Premiere Arrivals Part 2


Michelle Pfeiffer (What Lies Beneath; Hairspray) attended the premiere of her latest movie, New Year's Eve, at the Ziegfeld Theater in New York, along with her husband, David E. Kelley. The next celebrity couple on the red carpet was Michelle's co-star, Sarah Jessica Parker and her husband, Matthew Broderick. The pair leaned in to talk to each other on the red carpet and appeared to be very close.

High School Musical star Zac Efron put in his appearance. In the film, his character shares a kiss with Michelle Pfeiffer's character, something that Zac was reportedly very happy about. Finally, acting legend Robert De Niro made an appearance, to the delight of the photographers

New Year's Eve Trailer


On New Year's Eve, there is no better place to be than New York. All over the city, thousands are preparing for the most magical night of the year.

Continue: New Year's Eve Trailer

Scarface Review


OK
To say that Al Pacino chews the scenery as Tony Montana, Cuban drug lord par excellence, doesn't really do justice to the performance. Pacino tears into his lines with a lust approaching frenzy, ripping through scenes with an animalistic fervor, creating a role that has already gone down in the books as one of the great, if not the greatest, portrayals of a gangster ever to hit the screen. It's also, watching some 20 years down the line, laughably campy in a manner that the rest of this bloated, self-important film doesn't seem to appreciate.

Pacino and producer Martin Bregman had a good idea in wanting to make an updated version of the original 1932 Scarface, which chronicled the rise and fall of a Prohibition-era Capone-like criminal overlord (screenwriter Ben Hecht was a Chicago journalist with a lot of intimate knowledge of Capone). Handing it over to director Brian De Palma (who had specialized mostly in psychosexual thrillers like Dressed to Kill and The Fury), and screenwriter Oliver Stone (whose credits included an Oscar for 1978's Midnight Express but also Conan the Barbarian), was a daring move. Stone did a lot of research for the screenplay, hanging out and doing coke with drug lords all over Latin America, and De Palma promised to bring a certain visual flair to the proceedings.

Continue reading: Scarface Review

I Am Sam Review


Very Good
What defines a parent? Is it the amount of intellectual maturity displayed or the level of love given? Such is the question posed in I Am Sam.

In the film, Sam Dawson (Sean Penn) is a mentally challenged single father raising his daughter Lucy (Dakota Fanning). Sam is a sweet, good-natured man who earns a living by sweeping up at a local coffee store. His mental capacity is that of a seven-year-old, and as his daughter turns seven, she begins to intellectually outgrow her father. Soon, their lives come under the scrutiny of a social worker, who, "for the good of the child," wants Lucy placed into foster care.

Continue reading: I Am Sam Review

White Oleander Review


Very Good
White Oleander is one girl's dramatic coming-of-age story -- emphasis on the word "dramatic." A bright teen bounces around some dreadful foster homes, gets street-tough while in a facility for abandoned kids, and witnesses more tragedy in three years than any person should see in a lifetime. With such relentlessly morose subject matter, you'd think director Peter Kosminsky's adaptation of Janet Fitch's bestseller would lean toward TV melodrama -- and while the script may do so, Kosminsky's deft direction and fine editorial choices make White Oleander an effective and well-paced story of self-realization and determination.

The novel White Oleander was a 1999 selection of the ubiquitous Oprah Winfrey Book Club and you can tell why: There are so many brutally dysfunctional people in the story that Dr. Phil could produce months of television delving into their sorry lives. Astrid (Alison Lohman) is an only child, growing up in the Hollywood Hills with Ingrid (Michelle Pfeiffer), her eccentric, urban-arty mother. After a series of events that Kosminsky smartly keeps off-camera, Ingrid kills her boyfriend. Or does she? And how? Regardless, the beautiful, hopeful, young Astrid is picked up by state services and sent to live in a double-wide with a foster family.

Continue reading: White Oleander Review

The Deep End Of The Ocean Review


Very Good
I had expected the worst. I do not know what "The Deep End of the Ocean" is supposed to mean, but I figured it carried some deeply symbolic motif-laden mumbo-jumbo that novelists tend to include in their works, or else it was robbed from a dumb line of dialogue inserted merely to give a movie its name.

The title is evidently the former, though the movie is hardly the overwrought mess that I'd expected to see (for example: Message in a Bottle). Instead, The Deep End of the Ocean is a surprisingly thoughtful and laconic character study, full of nuance and genuine emotion, largely driven by Pfeiffer's unraveling character Beth. The well-known plot involves the sudden disappearance of Beth's 2 year-old son Ben, who vanishes while she is visiting Chicago. Nine agonizing years later, a kid who can only be Ben shows up -- as Sam, a neighbor's boy who wants to mow the lawn. Sure enough, it's him, but he doesn't remember his family,

Continue reading: The Deep End Of The Ocean Review

What Lies Beneath Review


Weak

Robert Zemeckis' self-indulgent direction hangs like an albatross around the celluloid neck of "What Lies Beneath," a soft-peddled yuppie horror flick that could have been -- with some fine tuning -- a sharp and genuinely scary thriller.

Forty minutes longer than necessary and featuring a cry-scream-and-run climax so drawn out that every ounce of tension evaporates from the screen half an hour before the credits roll, it's a frustrating movie to watch because of all the wasted potential.

Anything but a standard teens-in-peril slasher movie, "What Lies Beneath" stars Michelle Pfeiffer as a New England mom with empty nest syndrome after packing her daughter off to college in the opening scenes. Now alone in the house a lot, she becomes a busy body, spying on the new next door neighbors and witnessing what she thinks is a murder.

Continue reading: What Lies Beneath Review

Sinbad: Legend Of The Seven Seas Review


Bad

To understand how completely, contemptibly and cavalierly DreamWorks has gutted the Arabian legend of Sinbad for its every-cliché-in-the-book animated adaptation "Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas," all you need know is one line of dialogue, delivered by the hero in a feeble attempt at outdated hip-hop dialect:

"Who's baaad?...Sinbad!"

The fact that this line is delivered by an appallingly miscast Brad Pitt as the voice of a Santa-Monica-beach-bum-looking Sinbad only makes it worse.

Continue reading: Sinbad: Legend Of The Seven Seas Review

A Midsummer Night's Dream Review


OK

I've always seen "A Midsummer Night's Dream" as one of Shakespeare's daffier comedies -- what with the fairies and all -- so this film version, adapted by director Michael Hoffman ("One Fine Day," "Restoration"), came as something of a surprise because it takes itself so seriously.

Hoffman seems to hold the Bard's less jestful observations on amour ("The course of true love never did run smooth") in higher regard than his saucy slapstick of miscommunication.

The laughs are definitely present, but they're subdued as two pairs of young sweethearts steal away into the forest (of 19th Century Tuscany in this adaptation) trying to escape the consequences of an arranged marriage, and rush headlong and unknowingly into the domain of impishly interfering immortals.

Continue reading: A Midsummer Night's Dream Review

The Deep End Of The Ocean Review


OK

I had a problem with "The Deep End of the Ocean" right off thebat because Michelle Pfeiffer loses her kid (that's the plot) at one ofthose 15th class reunions that take place only in the movies.

Continue reading: The Deep End Of The Ocean Review

Michelle Pfeiffer

Michelle Pfeiffer Quick Links

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Michelle Pfeiffer

Date of birth

29th April, 1958

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.71


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Michelle Pfeiffer Movies

Murder on the Orient Express Movie Review

Murder on the Orient Express Movie Review

The latest adaptation of Agatha Christie's 83-year-old classic whodunit, this lavish, star-studded film is old-style...

Mother Movie Review

Mother Movie Review

Darren Aronofsky doesn't make fluffy movies, and has only had one genuine misfire (2014's Noah)....

Mother! Trailer

Mother! Trailer

A young woman (Jennifer Lawrence) and her older husband (Javier Bardem) have the most perfect...

Murder On The Orient Express Trailer

Murder On The Orient Express Trailer

It's the 1930s and a group of strangers from different walks of life board a...

The Family Movie Review

The Family Movie Review

Despite a promising trailer and a great cast, this French-American comedy-thriller is a complete misfire...

The Family Trailer

The Family Trailer

Giovanni Manzoni is a gangster boss who has been placed under witness protection by Agent...

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People Like Us Movie Review

People Like Us Movie Review

There's an intriguing true story buried inside this overly structured drama, and by playing by...

People Like Us Trailer

People Like Us Trailer

Sam is a successful salesman in his twenties who is dire need of a plan...

Dark Shadows Movie Review

Dark Shadows Movie Review

There were 1,245 episodes of the gothic soap Dark Shadows between 1966 and 1971, so...

New Year's Eve Movie Review

New Year's Eve Movie Review

The team that made the thin-but-enjoyable Valentine's Day in 2010 reunites for another massively overextended...

Dark Shadows Trailer

Dark Shadows Trailer

In 1752, The Collins family moves from Liverpool for a new life in North America....

New Year's Eve Trailer

New Year's Eve Trailer

On New Year's Eve, there is no better place to be than New York. All...

Cheri Trailer

Cheri Trailer

Watch the trailer for CheriCheri is the story of a gorgeous retired courtesan Léa and...

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