Michael York

Michael York

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8th Annual BritWeek Launch Party

Michael York and Pat York - 8th Annual BritWeek Launch Party - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 22nd April 2014

BAFTA Los Angeles Awards Season Tea Party

Michael York - BAFTA Los Angeles Awards Season Tea Party At Four Seasons Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 11th January 2014

40th Anniversary restoration of "Cabaret"

Michael York - 40th Anniversary restoration of "Cabaret" New York NY United States Thursday 31st January 2013

Michael York, Liza Minnelli, Joel Grey, Robert Osborne and Maris
Michael York, Liza Minnelli and Joel Grey
Michael York

at the TCM Classic Film Festival opening night premiere of the 40th anniversary restoration of 'Cabaret' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Michael York and Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Patricia McCallum; Michael York Thursday 12th April 2012 at the TCM Classic Film Festival opening night premiere of the 40th anniversary restoration of 'Cabaret' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Michael York and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

TCM Classic Film Festival opening night premiere of the 40th anniversary restoration of 'Cabaret' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Arrivals

Michael York and Grauman's Chinese Theatre Thursday 12th April 2012 TCM Classic Film Festival opening night premiere of the 40th anniversary restoration of 'Cabaret' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Arrivals

Michael York and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Conduct Unbecoming Review


OK
The movie looks hideous: What, was this made for the BBC? The weird lighting and bad camera work (not to mention the music and even the credits) screams Movie of the Week. Good thing the story is far better than its technical pedigree, a case of military justice about a women, ostensibly raped by a soldier in British colonial India. A number of solid performances can be found in the courtroom (especially Michael York's earnest defense attorney), though the machinations of the case border on the absurd. The ending -- the sole part of the film that is visually moving -- almost makes it all worthwhile.

Austin Powers In Goldmember Review


Weak
Goldmember finds Mike Myers returning to his most successful franchise, but desperately running out of steam and resorting to yet another stab at jokes that hit-and-missed the first two times around.

And guess what: They haven't improved with age.

Continue reading: Austin Powers In Goldmember Review

Murder on the Orient Express Review


Excellent
Classic Agatha Christie becomes a near-classic motion picture, as a dozen major stars are trapped on a snowbound train with what appears to be a killer on the loose. It's up to an absurdly made-up Poirot (Albert Finney) to unmask the murderer of a millionaire in this rich whodunit. Beautifully made and full of good one-liners, Ingred Bergman inexplicably won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar as a relatively forgettable "simple woman." Odd.

Romeo and Juliet (1968) Review


Good
Franco Zeffirelli's rendition of Shakespeare's classic tragic love story gets off to a slow and rocky start but eventually takes hold once its titular leads take over. The introduction of musical numbers isn't bad, though it severely dates this production to the '60s, however faithful it otherwise is as a period piece. Olivia Hussey's Juliet is the show stealer and would go on to modest success as an actress; Leonard Whiting (as Romeo), however, would quickly fade into obscurity in the following years. Winner of two Oscars and a Best Picture nominee.

Wide Sargasso Sea Review


Grim
In the same year as the masterful The Piano, Wide Sargasso Sea planted a foreign woman in a lush tropical setting and cut her loose to roll in the hay with the natives. The sexy similarities are uncanny, but Sargasso is about as uninteresting as romantic drama can get.

Starlet Karina Lombard was one of those shot-in-the-dark/outta-nowhere actresses (today's example: Kill Bill's Chiaki Kuriyama) who made a splash in a tiny role (she was the island girl who seduced Tom Cruise in The Firm) and subsequently bit off more than she could chew in a lead role. But since Lombard has no discernable acting ability, it's almost painful to watch her try to pull off this romance. Playing a Jamaican landowner in the 1840s, she marries an import Englishman named Rochester (Nathaniel Parker) in order to maintain her status. Too bad her family's a wreck, with a crazy mother locked up in the house. Nevertheless, there's plenty of time for lots of sex -- which originally earned Sargasso an R but got it re-rated as an NC-17 for it's minutely more graphic home video release (which is one minute longer than the R version).

Continue reading: Wide Sargasso Sea Review

The Three Musketeers (1973) Review


Good
I saw the word "whimsical" used in one product description of this installment of The Three Musketeers, a faithful adaptation of the classic novel, and no word could better describe the film. It's a combination of belly laughs via non-stop sight gags, endless swashbuckling, and only a dab of plot, all of which serve to make this an engaging event movie that takes place in France instead of in space. Packed with classic actors (including Charlton Heston, Christopher Lee, and Raquel Welch), this is a fun, nearly farcical adventure that's definitely worth a look.

The Four Musketeers Review


Good
More of the same from Richard Lester, who made The Three Musketeers a slapstick classic. Extremely cute and nearly as much fun as the original (D'Artagnan, now a musketeer, has to save his girlfriend from the clutches of the evil Rochefort), but this isn't a story that's exactly begging for a sequel.

Austin Powers: International Man Of Mystery Review


OK
A rare case of the sequel being far better than the original, the first Austin Powers (Mike Myers as unfrozen and bumbling 60s British superspy in the 90s) is uneven and often not funny, relying on recycled jokes and far-too-broad physical humor. Stick with the second one.

The Omega Code Review


Grim
A prophetic code hidden within the Torah. A sinister plot sealed until the end of the Age. Two men caught up in an ancient supernatural struggle to determine the fate of the next millennium.

Hey it sounds like a pretty cool concept for a film, right? I mean, it's the classic good-versus-evil scenario mixed in with the whole "end of the millennium" hype. It sounded like a good excuse to check it out.

Continue reading: The Omega Code Review

Cabaret Review


OK
Liza Minnelli's most famous work has her star as American singer Sally Bowles in 1930s Germany, where she falls for two men (including one bisexual) while trying to make ends meet singing at the Kit Kat Club, all while the Nazi rise to power builds around them. Much-lauded, Fosse's look at pre-Nazi Germany is pretty uneven and uninspired -- his work is far better when we're inside the Kit Kat Club where there's singing and dancing to be had. Also of note, the sound on this film is wretchedly bad to the point of near unwatchability. Originally based on the book Berlin Stories.
Michael York

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