Michael Wincott

Michael Wincott

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Knight Of Cups Trailer


Rick is one of the hottest screenwriters in Hollywood but after the death of his brother he finds himself becoming absorbed into a world of parties, drinking and excess. Parties are part of the norm for Rick but after the loss of his brother he finds himself evaluating his life and what it all means.

Spiralling uncontrollably his only real solace comes from short lived relationships with women, but each relationship actually brings Rick a little closer to the closure he seeks.

Knight Of Cups is the new film from Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life & The Thin Red Line)

Hitchcock Review


OK

What could have been an intriguing look at how Alfred Hitchcock created one of his most iconic masterpieces is instead turned into a gently entertaining romp. We may enjoy watching the twists and turns as this troubled project takes shape, but the script simply never breaks the surface or gives its stars any real depth to play with. So in the end, the most engaging thing about the film ends up being the portrayal of Hitchcock's marriage.

The story starts with the 1959 premiere of North by Northwest, a hit that critics dismissed as more of the same from a master resting on his laurels. So Hitchcock (Hopkins) decides to give them something unexpected, and takes his first foray into horror based on the little-known novel Psycho, a fictionalised story about a real serial killer. Working closely with his wife Alma (Mirren) on every aspect of the film, he is in constant conflict with the studio chief (Portnow) and the chief censor (Smith), who both believe the material is too strong. Meanwhile, Alma is tired of him flirting with his leading ladies (Johansson and Biel), so she takes a side job with a writer (Huston) who wants to be more than friends.

Oddly, neither director Gervasi (Anvil) nor writer McLaughlin (Black Swan) seems interested in getting beneath the surface of their central character, so Hitchcock is little more than the jovial caricature we saw in his TV anthology series. Hiding under layers of prosthetic face and body fat, Hopkins is good but never seems to break a sweat in the role. Which leaves Mirren to steal the film as Alma, mainly by departing from reality to create a more intriguing movie character instead. And Collette adds some spice as Hitchcock's assistant. But as the cast of Psycho, Johansson (as Janet Leigh), Biel (Vera Miles) and D'Arcy (Anthony Perkins) are only given small details to define them, which leaves them lurking uninterestingly around the edges.

Continue reading: Hitchcock Review

Pictures: No Hopkins Or Johansson, But 'Hitchcock' Premiere Still Shows Star Power


Helen Mirren Jessica Biel Toni Collette Sacha Gervasi Michael Wincott Jamie Lee Curtis

The Hitchcock cast at the LA Premiere

Hitchcock's leading ladies [L-R]Toni ColletteDame Helen MirrenJessica Biel

Some of Hollywood's most established stars - not least the cast themselves - turned out for the premiere of Hitchcockyesterday (November 20) at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, California. It's not surprising that such a dazzling array of talent should take to the red carpet, given that the film effectively honours one of the greatest directors of all time in Alfred Hitchcock. Taking center stage were leading ladies Toni Collete, Jessica Biel and, of course,Dame Helen Mirren- the latter extremely enamoured by Biel's gorgeous dress, struggling to keep her hands off it.

Continue reading: Pictures: No Hopkins Or Johansson, But 'Hitchcock' Premiere Still Shows Star Power

At The Premiere Of Fox Searchlight Pictures' 'Hitchcock' At The Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences Samuel Goldwyn Theater - Arrivals.

Michael Wincott - Michael Wincott, Tuesday 20th November 2012 at the premiere of Fox Searchlight Pictures' 'Hitchcock' at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Samuel Goldwyn Theater - Arrivals.

Michael Wincott
Michael Wincott
Michael Wincott
Michael Wincott

Hitchcock Trailer


Alfred Hitchcock was in his sixties and struggling to come up with a fresh idea for a new movie; that was until the notoriously terrifying story of 'Psycho' by Robert Bloch came along in 1959. Arguably one of his best ideas for a movie to date, the Oscar nominated Hitchcock set to work pulling it together despite the extreme scepticism of his wife Alma Reville and Paramount Pictures who disapproved of the degree of horror the movie maker was planning to utilise. In fact, he was so confident that he was willing to pour in thousands of dollars for the film to be made when he was refused his usual budget from the studio; an action that Alma found irresponsible and rather worrying.

'Hitchcock' is drama biopic strongly focused on Alfred's often strained though very loving relationship with his wife and has been based on the book 'Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho' by Stephen Rebello. Directed by Sacha Gervasi ('Anvil: The Story of Anvil' documentary) and written by BAFTA nominee John J. McLaughlin ('Man of the House', 'Black Swan'), this is story of how 'Psycho', one of the greatest films of all time, was made including its inspiration from real-life Winconsin murderer and grave robber Ed Gein. It is set for release on February 8th 2013 in the UK.

Starring: Scarlett Johansson, Anthony Hopkins, James D'Arcy, Jessica Biel, Michael Stuhlbarg, Ralph Macchio, Toni Collette, Judith Hoag, Danny Huston, Michael Wincott, Kurtwood Smith, Richard Portnow, John Rothman, Tara Summers, Helen Mirren.

Continue: Hitchcock Trailer

The Grand Opening Of The New OnePiece Store In West Hollywood

Michael Wincott - Lisa Dwan and Michael Wincott Los Angeles, California - The grand opening of the new OnePiece store in West Hollywood Thursday 12th May 2011

Michael Wincott
Michael Wincott
Michael Wincott
Atmosphere and Michael Wincott
Atmosphere and Michael Wincott
Michael Wincott

Leaving The Chateau Marmont Hotel

Michael Wincott Saturday 21st February 2009 Leaving the Chateau Marmont hotel Los Angeles, California

Michael Wincott

What Just Happened Trailer


Trailer for What Just Happened

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Seraphim Falls Review


Terrible
Director David Von Ancken's first feature after a lengthy stint in television shows his influence and experience without the slightest sense of shading. Out of the gate, Von Ancken found himself at the helm of Law & Order disciples CSI: NY and Cold Case, not to mention HBO's seminal Oz, and has been making his living at these shows ever since. Now, faced with a tale of post-Civil War vengeance, Ancken not only has to deal with the problem of sustaining fluidity, but of heftier emotional weight.Gideon (Pierce Brosnan) hides in the snowy drifts of the Ruby Mountains in northern Nevada. His hide has become a sought-after item; after a misunderstanding in the final days of the Civil War, Gideon's cold ignorance caused the unneeded death of one man's family. That man in question, Carver (Liam Neeson), has hired a trio of bandits to hunt down Gideon and exact what Carver sees as very just revenge.Much like Mel Gibson's misbegotten Apocalypto, Seraphim Falls takes its surroundings and time period simply as hallmark images to frame what is, sadly, a rather rudimentary look at vengeance and survival. Putting aside the outfits washed in waves of dirt and the small spurts of dialogue, the film could have taken place at any time and seems uninterested in exploring how the world the men inhabit and their time period affect their decisions.There's also a timid nature to the camerawork that sticks out. As Carver and his band of miscreants trails Gideon, they stomp through snowy mountains, faith-based wagon towns, and cracked-earth deserts. These areas seem flat and lacking character under Von Ancken and cinematographer John Toll, who somehow is also responsible for the shattering imagery of Terrence Malick's revelatory The Thin Red Line.The bland photography puts acute pressure on the actors to keep things popping, and most of the actors seem to take their roles with a passive grasp of character. Michael Wincott, an actor who oozes menace, is regulated as a rather forgettable sidekick to Carver, where he would have been more at home with the role of Carver. When Carver's men start getting picked off, the action gives a slight pulse to what is mostly a tepid pool up until then. After the final (and best) death scene, the two men, both visited by a strange bargainer (a particularly wasted Angelica Huston), face each other for a showdown.Seraphim Falls brings a hammering reminder that Westerns can still be made under tired eyes and loose constructs. Where the last few years have brought some strong evocations of the genre (The Proposition, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada) and just last week we were blessed by Tears of the Black Tiger, Von Ancken seems to take the basics of his genre as reassurance that he doesn't have to try as hard to make them work. As it is, Von Ancken can't seem to get his concentration away from the episodic nature of the small screen.Uncle Owen and Luke seem pretty upset.

The Doors Review


Good
I figure most of us thought The Doors was plenty of movie at 138 minutes. Little did we realize that one of Oliver Stone's least favorably received movies would call for a two-disc DVD set with 43 minutes of deleted scenes, numerous documentary extras, and a feature length commentary track from Stone.

And yet here it is.

Continue reading: The Doors Review

The Count Of Monte Cristo (2002) Review


Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count Of Monte Cristo (2002) Review

The Doors Review


Good
I figure most of us thought The Doors was plenty of movie at 138 minutes. Little did we realize that one of Oliver Stone's least favorably received movies would call for a two-disc DVD set with 43 minutes of deleted scenes, numerous documentary extras, and a feature length commentary track from Stone.

And yet here it is.

Continue reading: The Doors Review

The Count Of Monte Cristo Review


Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count Of Monte Cristo Review

Talk Radio Review


Excellent
Two powder kegs of angry energy -- director Oliver Stone and actor/writer Eric Bogosian -- joined together in 1988 for this character study set during the late '80s media explosion, a combustible drama about a self-important talk radio host (Bogosian) on the road to disaster. With every ranting Bogosian monologue, with every listener phone call of derision or adoration, both actor and director keep their audience riveted. It's an impressive feat considering that the bulk of Talk Radio takes place in a single radio studio.

Bogosian is Barry Champlain, a brilliant loudmouth gab machine hosting a popular nightly talk show filled with his strong opinions and whack-job listeners. One fears her garbage disposal. One begs to visit Barry at the studio. And one (many?) offer the Jewish host death threats in the name of Nazism.

Continue reading: Talk Radio Review

Michael Wincott

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