Michael Thomas

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Bullet For My Valentine Drummer To Sit Out Dates For Baby


Michael Thomas Bullet For My Valentine

The drummer will take a temporary leave of absence from the road and Pitchshifter star Jason Bowld will take his place.

A band statement reads: "Our brother Moose (Thomas) got the wonderful news late last year that he and his wife are expecting their first child together, which I'm sure you’ll join us in congratulating them on! In light of this, Moose has made the decision that, after ten years of non-stop touring, he's going to take a few months out to be at his wife's side around the birth.

"We support him 100% in this, and we thank our good friend Jason Bowld for agreeing to step in on the drums in the meantime."

Continue reading: Bullet For My Valentine Drummer To Sit Out Dates For Baby

Bullet For My Valentine In Concert

Michael Thomas - Bullet For My Valentine perfoming at the Manchester Phones4U Arena - Manchester, United Kingdom - Sunday 1st December 2013

Michael Thomas
Michael Thomas

Mister John Trailer


Gerry Devine is faced with a dilemma after suffering two personal tragedies; his brother drowned near his home in Singapore and the mother of his child has been unfaithful in their marriage at home in London. The tiny but beautiful Far Eastern country offers him an idyllic escape and chance to start his life over when he ventures there to deal with his brother's business, an Irish bar called Mister Johns. Surrounded by a stunning landscape and desirable women, there's a large part of him that wants to remain, comforted by his attractive sister-in-law Kim. However, as he manages to get himself into some trouble and his wife continues to call him, miserable in his absence and desperately worried about their daughter, Gerry struggles to find the right path as his grief blurs his concept of what he believes is right and wrong.

Continue: Mister John Trailer

Paradise: Hope [Paradies: Hoffnung] Review


Excellent

After Love and Faith, Austrian filmmaker Ulrich Seidl takes a gentler approach to explore hope, although the film is equally unsettling. This is an inventive look at the conflicting desires and aspirations of teens and adults, and as it dips into areas that are deeply inappropriate, it turns memorably provocative.

While her mother is in Kenya on holiday (see Love), Melli (Lenz) is staying with her religious aunt (see Faith), who sends her to a summer diet camp for overweight teens. The fitness programme is run by a disciplinarian coach (Thomas) and strict nutritionist (Bartsch) who put the kids through their paces. But it's the camp's middle-aged doctor (Lorenz) who catches Melli's attention. As he monitors her health, she starts to flirt with him. And he flirts back. She's encouraged to keep going by her new friend Verena (Lehbauer), who's much more experienced with men and helps Melli sneak out for a trip to a local bar to meet a few more.

Seidl's filmmaking approach is observational rather than plot-driven. And watching this awkward interaction is often very funny, although we feel a bit guilty about laughing at it. Especially as the film quietly and astutely explores the characters' deep yearning for connection with other people, including of course the potent curiosity every adolescent feels about sex. It's hardly surprising that these kids have secret drunken parties, play spin the bottle and raid the kitchen for midnight snacks.

Continue reading: Paradise: Hope [Paradies: Hoffnung] Review

Premiere Of 'The Devils Double' Held At Theater Tuschinski

Dominic Cooper, Mem Ferda and Michael Thomas - Dominic Cooper, Michael Thomas, Mimoun Oaissa and Mem Ferda with the cast and writers Amsterdam, The Netherlands - Premiere of 'The Devils Double' held at Theater Tuschinski Monday 5th September 2011

Dominic Cooper, Mem Ferda and Michael Thomas
Dominic Cooper
Dominic Cooper
Dominic Cooper
Dominic Cooper, Mem Ferda and Michael Thomas
Dominic Cooper, Mem Ferda and Michael Thomas

The Devil's Double Review


Excellent
Anchored by a fierce double performance from Dominic Cooper, this true story is so intensely violent that it's not easy to watch. But it's an extremely well-made film, and the tight point of view makes it both riveting and urgent.

In 1990 Iraq, Saddam Hussein's son Uday (Cooper) is on a rampage of rape, torture and murder when he grabs his old school friend Latif Yahia (Cooper again) and forces him to become his stand-in. Latif isn't allowed to say no and, after extensive training and plastic surgery, plus the approval of Saddam (Quast), he becomes Uday's doppelganger. But he never hides his belief that Uday is a psychopath, even to his mentor Munem (Rawl). And he takes an even bigger risk when he falls for one of Uday's girls, Sarrab (Sagnier).

Continue reading: The Devil's Double Review

B. Monkey Review


Good
Her name is B. Monkey. Why they called her movie B. Monkey is beyond me. No matter. Asia Argento is rather striking in this lead role, about a gorgeous heist artist who tries to get out of the business, settles down with a schoolteacher (Jared Harris), and gets sucked back in to crime. The film's story (as told by Il Postino director Michael Radford) is sleek and fun, and is helped in no small regard by the fact that Argento spends virtually the entire 95 minutes buck naked. Nice.

The Hunger Review


OK
Tepid vampire fare is really notable only for being Tony Scott's first major movie and for its steamy love scene between Catherine Deneuve and Susan Sarandon (never mind that awful hairdo). David Bowie would have been a lot more fun if they hadn't offed him in the first 45 minutes.

Welcome To Woop Woop Review


OK
Somewhere between A Boy and his Dog, Blue Velvet, and The Sound of Music, lies Welcome to Woop Woop, a truly oddball tale (as all Aussie movies tend to be) about an American con artist hiding out down under. Upon meeting a wild Aussie girl, he is promptly kidnapped to the very remote village of Woop Woop, whose sole industry is turning kangaroos into dog food called Woof Woof. It's no Queen of the Desert, but lets call it a middling princess.

Ladyhawke Review


Good
Setting aside the hamfisted Alan Parsons score and Rutger Hauer's equally hammy performance, Ladyhawke is a fine little fantasy based on a timeless tale. A curse has caused Hauer and his lover (Michelle Pfeiffer) to never cross paths -- he turns into a wolf at night, she turns into a hawk by day. Matthew Broderick -- who redeems the film completely for any of its datedness -- plays the thief who aids the pair in exacting revenge on an evil bishop (John Wood, reunited with Broderick from WarGames). Moody and quite dark, this is a great movie for a sleepy Sunday afternoon.

All The Way Review


Weak
Dennis Hopper as Frank Sinatra? It's a crazy idea, but not as wild as you might think. From a distance, Hopper bears a striking resemblance to the older, chunkier Frank. And whoever's doing the singing for him reasonably approximates a blend of Hopper's voice with Sinatra's.

Of course, there's a plot you need to suffer through to marvel at the stunt casting, and it involves a presumably true story about Sinatra being wooed to visit Australia in 1974 by a two-bit promoter. Getting him Down Under is only half the fun. Once he arrives, Frank -- in his inimitable way -- insults a reporter (Portia de Rossi) by calling her a whore. Aussie's native sons rise to defend her, and over 100 unions go on strike to ensure Frank won't be able to eat, drink, travel, or take a shower -- much less perform on stage. Hilarity ensues as our promoter friend (Joel Edgerton) tries to patch things back together, dealing with his own love life along the way.

Continue reading: All The Way Review

Backbeat Review


Good
If you think the story of the Beatles begins in February 1964 on the stage of The Ed Sullivan Show then you need a pretty serious history lesson. Backbeat provides it, traveling back in time to the earliest days of the '60s, when the Fab Four were a starving band of outsiders living a fun but also fairly hellish life on the mean streets of Hamburg.

You may have heard of Pete Best, the band's original drummer. He's on the scene here (not Ringo), and so is bassist Stuart Sutcliffe, the so-called "fifth Beatle," the one around whom this telling of the Beatles tale revolves.

Continue reading: Backbeat Review

Michael Thomas

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