Michael Rosenbaum

Michael Rosenbaum

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Celebrities at Comic Con

Michael Rosenbaum - Celebrities at Comic Con in San Diego - San Diego, California, United States - Thursday 9th July 2015

Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum

Michael Rosenbaum goes shopping at The Grove

Michael Rosenbaum - Michael Rosenbaum goes shopping at The Grove in Hollywood - Hollywood, California, United States - Saturday 23rd May 2015

Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum

Michael Rosenbaum goes shopping in Beverly Hills

Michael Rosenbaum - Smallville star Michael Rosenbaum goes shopping in Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 5th March 2015

Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum

Celebrities shop at The Grove

Michael Rosenbaum - A variety of celebs were spotted as they went shopping at The Grove in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 29th November 2014

Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum
Michael Rosenbaum

Picture - Actor Michael Rosenbaum , Sunday 21st October 2012

Michael Rosenbaum - Actor Michael Rosenbaum Sunday 21st October 2012 has his hands full as he leaves Crate & Barrel after shopping at The Grove with his girlfriend

Hit & Run Review


OK

Audiences out for a bit of mindless fun will probably enjoy this raucous road movie, but only if they can look past comedy that relies on jokes about racism, sexism and homophobia. And if the characters are all paper-thin, at least the film is loose and enjoyably silly.

It centres on Charlie (Shepard), who lives in rural California with his girlfriend Annie (Bell). But when she's offered a job in Los Angeles, Charlie has to face up to his criminal past. He's currently in witness protection, and returning to L.A. is very dangerous. Still, he decides to take Annie to her job interview, while his protective agent (Arnold) follows close behind. But trouble is brewing because Annie's still-smitten ex (Rosenbaum) is also in hot pursuit, and when he figures out Charlie's secret, he gets in touch with the gang boss, Alex (Cooper), who wants him dead.

While the film looks whizzy and is packed with banter that sounds offensive, everything is pretty half-hearted. The dialog continually touches on sexuality and ethnicity in ways that are more lazy than inappropriate, and the discussions of serious issues like gender roles have no depth at all. This is a movie essentially made up of nothing but stereotypes. Bell and Cooper just about manage to give their characters personalities, but everyone else has essentially one note. Most of the men are mere chucklehead idiots, while the women are male fantasies.

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Hit and Run Trailer


When Charlie Bronson, a bank robbery getaway driver on a witness protection programme, jeopardizes his life to take his beloved fiancée to Los Angeles, his past comes knocking at his door in the form of his old best friends who want their money after being released from an 8 month prison sentence. Charlie's abrupt escape leads to a frenzied sequence of car chases involving his former friends, gangsters and the police, not to mention Charlie's fiancée's shock and rage at finding out that he hasn't been honest with her.

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Hit and Run - Trailer Trailer


Father Of Invention Trailer


Robert Axle is a wealthy infomercial master. However, when one of his latest inventions has a design fault that chops users' fingers off, his empire shatters. After spending eight years in federal prison, he is released, and begins to attempt to rebuild his fortune.

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Kickin' It Old Skool Review


Grim
Haven't I seen this movie before? More to the point: Haven't I seen Jamie Kennedy make this movie before?

Well, not exactly. While Malibu's Most Wanted featured a goofy white guy obsessed with rap culture -- to the extreme annoyance of everyone around him -- Kickin' It Old Skool gives us Kennedy as a goofy white guy obsessed with... breakdancing culture. The key difference? In Old Skool Kennedy is a coma victim who awakens 20 years after a junior-high talent show (after breakdancing his way to a concussion, of course), only to find a world that's unlike the '80s. Wait, haven't I seen this movie before?

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Sorority Boys Review


Grim
The heavily recycled "war-of-the-Greeks" movie theme, first made popular in the early 1980s, has returned to the screen in an updated form with the cross-gender comedy Sorority Boys. The movie is filled to its bong-brim with the crude, embarrassing humor of its predecessors, however its sole joke fails to leave an impact.

Dave (Barry Watson), Doofer (Harland Williams), and Adam (Michael Rosenbaum) are the only members of the KOK (pronounced cock) fraternity social committee. During one bash, the money the house had saved to sponsor the annual KOKtail Cruise is stolen and the three bumbleheads are accused of pilfering the money. They are banished from the house. They then return for the next night's party to find out who really took the money. To get into the party, though, they need a disguise. What better way to fool their fraternity brothers than to show up at the party as women!? "Daisy," "Roberta," and "Adina" go to the party to find a hidden video camera that recorded the true thief in the act. All they need to do is find the videotape and their innocence will be revealed. If it were only so easy! Instead, they are tossed out of the party during the ceremony known as "dogcatcher" -- usually reserved for getting rid of the unattractive women of the neighboring Delta Omicron Gamma (DOG - clever, huh?) sorority.

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Poolhall Junkies Review


Grim
Deceptive advertisements aside, there's very little Christopher Walken in Poolhall Junkies, a dull and lifeless film about a down-and-out underdog overcoming adversity to triumph in the end. The legendary actor (who seems to dominate every frame of the film's television commercials) shows up for only two notable scenes - his introduction, and the film's climax - and, when he's on screen, this middling B-movie displays some sizzle and pizzazz that's otherwise all too conspicuously missing from its "kind-hearted hustler makes good" blather. Walken has made a career out of rejuvenating shoddy clunkers like this one and, despite his limited screen time, he devours his scenes with the kind of gleeful voraciousness that his co-stars would be wise to study.

Star/writer/director Gregory "Mars" Martin has certainly taken a few lessons from watching Walken. As pool prodigy Johnny Doyle, Martin sports bouffant Walken-esque hair and mimics the actor's famously off-kilter verbal cadence, but has no idea how to craft a performance aside from these affectations. As an orphaned kid, Doyle was taken under the wing of a mobster named Joe (Chazz Palminteri) who taught him to be a pool-playing con man. Years later, Doyle learns that Joe screwed him out of a chance to go professional, and he turns on his former benefactor - a decision that comes back to haunt him when Joe returns looking for revenge with a professional ringer (a surprisingly convincing Rick Schroder) in tow. Doyle is trying to keep his relationship with girlfriend Tara (Alison Eastwood) afloat despite her disapproval over his pool shark ways, and also attempting to steer his eager brother Danny (Michael Rosenbaum) and his gang of straight-out-of-central-casting wisecracking buddies away from a life of hustling.

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Bringing Down The House Review


Good
More than a decade after Steve Martin lost control of his own home in Housesitter, another of his patented Poor Sap characters is in similar trouble. This time, instead of a spunky, conniving Goldie Hawn acting as unwanted tenant, a sassy, street-smart, badass Queen Latifah is movin' on up. Thankfully, Martin and Latifah make for a good high-concept Hollywood odd couple that keeps all races and ages laughing, in director Adam Shankman's speedy, funky -- and politically incorrect -- comedy.

Martin, in a plain, white guy role that's getting a bit tired, is tax attorney Peter Sanderson. He's got a fairly palatial suburban home, an ex-wife, two kids... and a chat room buddy named "lawyergirl." Peter quickly learns that making friends on the Internet can be a bitch -- his dream girl ends up being an ex-con named Charlene (Latifah), a sly loudmouth who's served time for armed robbery. Through some not-so-gentle blackmail, Charlene enlists Peter's legal aid and moves into his house and life.

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Cursed Review


Zero
Friday, February 25, 2005

If you're looking for a review of "Cursed" or "Man of the House" in your newspaper this morning, you're not going to find one -- in any newspaper anywhere. Opening in theaters nationwide today, these two movies have been kept hidden from critics because, to be blunt, the studios think they're garbage and want to rake in as much money as they can before word gets out.

Of course, nobody will admit to this at Dimension Films or Columbia Pictures, which are releasing the junkers. But it's no coincidence that every movie Hollywood doesn't screen in advance -- either by not holding previews until the night before opening or not holding them at all -- is largely lambasted once critics and audiences have caught up with it.

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Bringing Down The House Review


Grim

Toothlessly trite and inundated with a relentlessly chirpy elevator-music score, "Bringing Down the House" is a ghetto-woman-in-the-ritzy-white-suburbs culture-clash comedy sanitized to oblige the same middle-aged white folks that are the butts of most of its jokes.

It's about an uptight, overworked, miserably divorced tax attorney (a hammy yet vanilla Steve Martin) whose life is turned upside down when a woman he'd flirted with in a legal-forum online chatroom turns up on his doorstep for a date not looking anything like the sophisticated, young white lawyer she'd pretended to be. She is, in fact, a feisty, girthy, street-smart spitfire straight outta Compton (and played with relish by Queen Latifah) who has just escaped from prison and wants Martin's help proving her innocence on an erroneous armed robbery charge.

The movie would have little plot if these two didn't spend the next five reels trying to hoodwink Martin's neighbors and law partners into thinking the loud-and-proud Latifah is a nanny or a maid -- telling lie on top of outrageous lie when a simple variation on the truth ("She's an acquaintance that I'm helping with a case") would have sufficed.

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Michael Rosenbaum

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