Michael Radford

Michael Radford

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Elsa & Fred Review


Good

While this geriatric romance is too simplistic and sentimental to be anything remarkable, its lively central performances add some badly needed subtext and make the film worth a look. Meanwhile, the supporting cast add some spark to their scenes, elevating the warm, silly drama with quirky humour and some more resonant themes. It's also remarkably honest about how it feels to grow older.

Set in New Orleans, the story starts as 80-year-old Fred (Christopher Plummer) is moved by his hyperactive daughter Lydia (Marcia Gay Harden) into a small apartment building. Fred's wife has recently died, but they didn't get along very well, so he's enjoying being on his own. Although Lydia's husband (Chris Noth) has yet another crazy business scheme he wants Fred to invest in. And his new next door neighbour is Elsa (Shirley MacLaine), a larger-than-life 74-year-old who claims to have once known Picasso. Her son Raymond (Scott Bakula) looks in on her from time to time, while she secretly supports her younger son Alec (Reg Rogers) in his artistic career. She also immediately starts trying to coax Fred out of his shell.

Obviously, the main idea is that you're never too old to fall in love, so director-cowriter Michael Radford (Il Postino) tries to balance a comedy about ageing with a sweet love story about an engagingly mismatched couple. The blend of genres is somewhat uneven, as the script never quite decides whether it's about making the most of the time you have left, being open to unexpected romance or accepting your family members for who they are. All of these big themes are in here, most with a fairly heavy-handed touch. But at least this means that the film is about more than just a bunch of goofy characters interacting in rather silly ways.

Continue reading: Elsa & Fred Review

Elsa & Fred Trailer


Fred Barcroft is an old man struggling to find much good in his life following the death of his wife. While he feels terribly lonely, he hates being around people, and while he despises the tiny apartment his daughter Lydia has moved him into, he can't bear to enjoy the world outside. Soon he meets Elsa Hayes from a nearby apartment; a free spirit of similar age determined to enjoy the last years of her life in the most spectacular ways possible, be it running from an expensive restaurant without paying or going dancing like she did when she was young. She teaches Fred that death is not something to be feared, rather a motivation to live the life you have. While Lydia disapproves of her father's newfound romance, he starts to open up, cheer up and realise that his life is far from over.

Continue: Elsa & Fred Trailer

Guest and Michael Radford - Miami International Film Festival (MIFF) 2014 - Elsa & Fred - Premiere - Miami, Florida, United States - Friday 7th March 2014

Guest and Michael Radford
Michael Radford and Ja Ie Laplante

Michael Radford - The 18th Capri, Hollywood Film Festival - Preview Launch - Rome, Italy - Wednesday 18th December 2013

Michael Radford
Michael Radford

B. Monkey Review


Very Good
Her name is B. Monkey. Why they called her movie B. Monkey is beyond me. No matter. Asia Argento is rather striking in this lead role, about a gorgeous heist artist who tries to get out of the business, settles down with a schoolteacher (Jared Harris), and gets sucked back in to crime. The film's story (as told by Il Postino director Michael Radford) is sleek and fun, and is helped in no small regard by the fact that Argento spends virtually the entire 95 minutes buck naked. Nice.

Dancing At The Blue Iguana Review


OK
I'm jaded enough as a film critic to be unsurprised when I see a movie about five strippers, all leading melodramatic and tragic lives.

But when those five strippers are all reasonably B-level or former A-level movie stars, even my ears start to perk up. Even more amazing -- they're all naked.

Continue reading: Dancing At The Blue Iguana Review

White Mischief Review


Very Good
It's lust and... more lust, under the Kenyan sun. In this pulpy 1940s period piece. On the eve of WWII, British colonists are living high on the hog -- none higher than a British noble (Joss Ackland), who returns to Africa with a hot young wife (Greta Scacchi, mostly naked throughout the film), who promptly gets into all sorts of trouble. Namely this involves an affair with a local womanizer (Charles Dance), who ends up dead, shot in the head, before too long. One of Britain's most notorious and "unsolved" murders, Ackland's character stands trial and ultimately goes free. This very interesting and authentically recreated (the story is true) tale is still a bit cold in the final analysis, though Scacchi hits notes she'd never reach again.

The Postman (Il Postino) (1995) Review


Excellent
The story surrounding the making of The Postman is almost as interesting as the film itself. English/Austrian Michael Radford was hand-picked by the star of the picture, Italian Massimo Troisi, to direct the dramatization of a Chilean novel about the story of Pablo Neruda (Phillippe Noiret), a Chilean poet exiled to an Italian island, where he befriends a local fisherman-cum-letter carrier.

Radford accepted the assignment, and Troisi assumed the title role of Mario, a simple Everyman whom Neruda slowly cultivates from tongue-tied wallflower to smooth Romeo. With Neruda's advice and introduction to poetry, Mario is able to overcome his awkwardness and enchant the woman of his dreams, the darkly beautiful Beatrice (Maria Grazia Cucinotta), and subsequently he convinces her to marry him. His transformation complete, Mario finds inside himself the romanticism and courage that we all wish for.

Continue reading: The Postman (Il Postino) (1995) Review

The Merchant Of Venice Review


Very Good
When I heard that Al Pacino was playing Shylock in The Merchant of Venice, part of me was extremely skeptical. I was fearful he would bellow every other word ("If YOU prick US!"), which has been his acting technique for over a decade. Or, perhaps he would lapse into the Foghorn Leghorn accent that made The Recruit such a hoot.

It's been a crap shoot with the great actor for some time. Watching Pacino is like watching a beloved, over the hill athlete sticking around. He hobbles, the crispness of his movements isn't there, and the mixture of luck and confidence he once had is just a pleasant memory. More often than not, you just hope he just doesn't stumble. You just want a glimmer of what once was.

Continue reading: The Merchant Of Venice Review

Michael Radford

Michael Radford Quick Links

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Michael Radford Movies

Elsa & Fred Movie Review

Elsa & Fred Movie Review

While this geriatric romance is too simplistic and sentimental to be anything remarkable, its lively...

Elsa & Fred Trailer

Elsa & Fred Trailer

Fred Barcroft is an old man struggling to find much good in his life following...

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Dancing At The Blue Iguana Movie Review

Dancing At The Blue Iguana Movie Review

I'm jaded enough as a film critic to be unsurprised when I see a movie...

The Merchant of Venice Movie Review

The Merchant of Venice Movie Review

When I heard that Al Pacino was playing Shylock in The Merchant of Venice, part...

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