Michael Ohoven

Michael Ohoven

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Mr.Pink Summer Soiree in Beverly Hills

Michael Ohoven and Joyce Giraud - Mr.Pink Summer Soiree held at Sofitel Los Angeles at Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 23rd July 2015

Michael Ohoven and Joyce Giraud
Michael Ohoven and Joyce Giraud

Michael Ballack at Craigs

Michael Ballack, Michael Ohoven and Joyce Giraud - Michael Ballack and a female friend seen leaving Craigs restaurant with Joyce Giraud and Husband Michael Ohoven after having dinner together. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 1st May 2015

Joyce Giraud, Michael Ohoven and Michael Ballack

NBC/Universal's 72nd Annual Golden Globes After Party - Arrivals

Joyce Giraud and Michael Ohoven - A host of stars were snapped as they arrived for NBC/Universal's 72nd Annual Golden Globes after party. The party was sponsored in part by Chrysler, Hilton, and Qatar and was held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 12th January 2015

Joyce Giraud and Michael Ohoven
Joyce Giraud and Michael Ohoven
Joyce Giraud
Joyce Giraud

Joyce Giraud shops for sunglasses with her husband Michael Ohoven at Dan Deutsch Optical

Joyce Giraud and Michael Ohoven - Ex-Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star, Joyce Giraud, shops for sunglasses with her husband, Michael Ohoven, at Dan Deutsch Optical in Los Angeles - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 6th August 2014

Joyce Giraud and Michael Ohoven
Joyce Giraud and Michael Ohoven
Joyce Giraud and Michael Ohoven
Joyce Giraud and Michael Ohoven
Joyce Giraud and Michael Ohoven

Lisa Vanderpump and Ken Todd launch of PUMP Lounge

Michael Ohoven and Joyce Giraud - Lisa Vanderpump and Ken Todd attend launch of their newest culinary endeavor, PUMP Lounge, featuring a curated menu by Executive Chef Penny Davidi in West Hollywood. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 13th May 2014

Michael Ohoven and Joyce Giraud
Michael Ohoven and Joyce Giraud

Just Friends Review


Weak
I like Ryan Reynolds. I like Anna Faris. I'm befuddled why Amy Smart hasn't become the 21st century version of Meg Ryan. All three star in Just Friends, and they are all likable, with Reynolds and Faris showing deft comic timing. It's too bad the script doesn't just let them down, it leaves them for dead.

The movie starts in 1995. Chris (Reynolds) and Jamie (Smart) are childhood friends, who have just graduated high school. Chris chooses the night of her graduation party to confess his love for her. Long story short, Chris's love for Jamie gets broadcast for everyone to hear, and she responds by telling Jamie that she loves him. Like a brother.

Continue reading: Just Friends Review

The Devil's Rejects Review


Excellent
House of 1000 Corpses, the last song on Rob Zombie's 2001 album The Sinister Urge, also served as the title track to the metal frontman-turned-filmmaker's 2003 directorial debut, but the cut's country twang-inflected ghoulishness would have made a more apt musical accompaniment for Zombie's The Devil's Rejects. Less a sequel than a spiritual follow-up, the director's latest revisits House's serial-killing Firefly clan as they're cast into the backwater dustbowls of rural America by a sheriff (William Forsythe) intent on exacting vigilante revenge for the murder of his brother. A gritty Western-via-grindhouse modern exploitation flick imbued with the ferocity of independent '70s horror, Zombie's splatterfest wisely alters virtually everything (narratively, stylistically, thematically) that characterized his campy, cartoonish and awkward first film. And from its coarse, graphic visual aesthetic, profusion of classic Southern rock tunes, and portrait of unrepentant mayhem, his film reverentially exults in the deranged spirit and impulsive, unpredictable energy of seminal genre masterpieces The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and The Hills Have Eyes.

The Devil's Rejects diverges from its predecessor beginning with its opening frames, in which the depiction of the Firefly residence - no longer a remote, forest-shrouded funhouse of horrors but, rather, a dilapidated structure situated in a stretch of open land - speaks to the film's rejection of atmospheric claustrophobia in favor of wide-open anarchy. A fascination with rampant disorder certainly fuels the tour de force intro sequence, a bullet-strewn siege on the Firefly home by Sheriff Wydell (Forsythe) and an army of police officers heightened by Zombie's sly use of freeze frames, Sergio Leone-esque close-ups, and The Allman Brothers' "Midnight Rider." Exhibiting a directorial maturity devoid of his former MTV-ish gimmickry (no hyper-edited montages with varying film stocks or bludgeoning industrial heavy metal here), the director orchestrates the chaotic events with feverish abandon, his shaky handheld camera set-ups and scraggly, sun-bleached cinematography (courtesy of Phil Parmet) placing us directly inside the carnage. By the time murderous siblings Otis (Bill Moseley) and Baby (Sheri Moon) escape their now overrun home to seek shelter in the rotting, blindingly white desert, Zombie has demonstrated a newfound adeptness at lacing nasty action with a breakneck thrust and vicious wit.

Continue reading: The Devil's Rejects Review

The Cave Review


Good
When I as a kid, there was no better place in Denver than Celebrity's Sports Center. I was not an athletic adolescent -- I spent more time reading books in my bedroom than I did tossing around the pigskin or chasing skirt -- but luckily for me Celebrity's Sports Center wasn't that type of "sports" place. It was a bowling alley/arcade/indoor water slide extravaganza where even the most geeky, awkward child could feel as though he or she was a star. What attracted me most to Celebrity's was the waterslides. There were three: the Dolphin, the Shark, and the Barracuda. Despite its often being referred to as the "baby" slide, or the "slow" one, I most enjoyed the Dolphin. Not because I was a lily-livered wuss, but because it was the one slide with rocky overhangs and waterfalls. For the two minutes that you drafted down the Dolphin you passed through a veritable equatorial jungle, replete with cascades, overhanging foliage and steep cliff faces -- all fake, of course.) And being in that slide, spiraling down to the warm pool, I often imagined myself an explorer making his way to some subterranean kingdom inhabited by monstrous creatures and lovely damsels in distress. (They tore Celebrity's down in the late '90s to make way for a Home Depot. Have people no respect?)

Watching The Cave I had that same feeling. The movie is like a multi-million dollar recreation of my boyhood fantasies on the Dolphin. And despite the many lapses in logic, the ridiculous plot twists, and the sketchy characterizations, I found myself giddy while watching The Cave.

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Undiscovered Review


Terrible
Watch enough movies and after a while you learn a few things. Here's one important lesson: When the number of ushers assigned to a theater showing a movie is greater than the number of people actually watching the movie, you're in trouble. For Undiscovered, the final count during this reviewer's public screening: Ushers 3; Audience Members 1.

This underwhelming romantic drama set against the backdrop of L.A.'s rock music scene doesn't break that rule. Oddly enough, what dooms the movie is its strict adherence to two overused story tactics, "a star is made; a star is destroyed" and "the missed opportunity" romance. Predictably, the results are not pleasant and ushers nationwide will have an easy time cleaning gum and cola off the floors.

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Capote Review


Excellent
Capturing the inspirational process of a quirky character can be a daunting task. You have to weigh informational material with a big personality, and keep these two balanced over the course of a changing story without getting bogged down with proving a truth or allowing an actor to get so overwhelming that you miss the entire point of the film.

Hence why Philip Seymour Hoffman is such a perfect choice to play Truman Capote in a film about the research that became the book In Cold Blood. Not only does he look like him and sound like him, but because Capote was such an enormous personality in his own right, the smallest glimpse into Hoffman's movements or talk speaks volumes. He conveys so much with so little, and he's able to provide an amazing performance of the four years it took to write his biggest seller.

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Evelyn Review


Extraordinary
I chuckled when I noticed that my preview screening for Evelyn was shown in a theater next to another theater featuring Die Another Day. At first I thought the theater was doing a tribute to Pierce Brosnan, but then I realized it was just a coincidence that he was starring in two movies at the same time in the same theater. I feared my view of Brosnan in Evelyn would be tainted because of his typecasting as the suave British spy. Much to my delight however, Brosnan effectively sheds his powerful alter-ego and turns in a warm and touching performance as an average, Irish working-class bloke in Evelyn.

Based on a true story that took place in the 1950s, Brosnan plays Desmond Doyle, a father of three young children who is left to care for the kids when his wife leaves him for another man the day after Christmas. This happens to coincide with another unsettling loss for Doyle - he's recently lost his job. Since he is unable to find work, the courts have taken his two sons and only daughter Evelyn (Sophie Vavasseur) and placed them in church run orphanages. When he finds suitable employment and tries to re-unite with his children, he finds his troubles have only just begun.

Continue reading: Evelyn Review

Michael Ohoven

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