Michael Murphy

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White House Down Trailer


When USCP officer John Cale is turned down as he applies for a highly coveted role in the Secret Service, he is devastated but cannot find it in himself to disappoint his young daughter Emily who idolises him and his job. In a bid to give Emily an experience to remember, he takes her on a tour of the White House, but what started out as the most normal of days (if a little extra exciting for Emily) quickly becomes a situation of life and death when terrorist groups launch a series of bombs that hit the White House causing a shocking scene of devastation. John now finds himself with the responsibility of keeping his daughter safe from harm as well as protecting President James Sawyer along with the rest of his country. He may have lost out on becoming an official protector of the President, but he now faces a true test of his abilities that is unlikely to go unnoticed.

Continue: White House Down Trailer

Picture - Jeremy Jordan and Ashley Spencer , Monday 16th January 2012

Jeremy Jordan and Michael Murphy - Jeremy Jordan and Ashley Spencer Monday 16th January 2012 If It Only Even Runs A Minute 8, a concert series celebrating underappreciated Broadway musicals, held at Joe's Pub.

Jeremy Jordan and Michael Murphy

Picture - Kevin Michael Murphy and Lucy... , Monday 16th January 2012

Kevin Michael and Michael Murphy - Kevin Michael Murphy and Lucy Horton Monday 16th January 2012 If It Only Even Runs A Minute 8, a concert series celebrating underappreciated Broadway musicals, held at Joe's Pub.

Kevin Michael and Michael Murphy
Kevin Michael and Michael Murphy
Kevin Michael and Michael Murphy

Picture - Jennifer Ashley Tepper and Kevin... , Monday 16th January 2012

Kevin Michael and Michael Murphy - Jennifer Ashley Tepper and Kevin Michael Murphy Monday 16th January 2012 If It Only Even Runs A Minute 8, a concert series celebrating underappreciated Broadway musicals, held at Joe's Pub.

Kevin Michael and Michael Murphy
Kevin Michael and Michael Murphy
Kevin Michael and Michael Murphy
Kevin Michael and Michael Murphy
Kevin Michael and Michael Murphy

Picture - Jeremy Jordan and Claybourne Elder , Monday 16th January 2012

Jeremy Jordan and Michael Murphy - Jeremy Jordan and Claybourne Elder Monday 16th January 2012 If It Only Even Runs A Minute 8, a concert series celebrating underappreciated Broadway musicals, held at Joe's Pub.

Picture - Jeremy Jordan from the film... , Monday 16th January 2012

Jeremy Jordan and Michael Murphy - Jeremy Jordan from the film 'Joyful Noise' Monday 16th January 2012 If It Only Even Runs A Minute 8, a concert series celebrating underappreciated Broadway musicals, held at Joe's Pub.

Jeremy Jordan and Michael Murphy

Away From Her Review


OK
The act of being forgotten becomes pop-Bergman fair in Sarah Polley's Away from Her. If Polley's name rings a few bells, its because she was a rather prominent ingénue of independent cinema in the early '00s, her range swinging from Doug Liman's rollicking Go to Atom Egoyan's solemn, sublime The Sweet Hereafter. Here, director Egoyan serves as executive producer and gives the floor to Polley as she translates Alice Munro's short story "The Bear Came Over the Mountain" to the screen.

Fiona (Julie Christie) has begun to lose her memory as an effect of Alzheimer's. Grant (Gordon Pinsent), her husband, can only sigh heavily as he watches her slip away; at one point, she puts a frying pan in the freezer. Begrudgingly, Grant signs Fiona into a home for people with Alzheimer's and other diseases incurred through aging. There's a catch: He can't see her for a month, allowing her to settle in without any debilitations. He returns to find Fiona's memory thickly veiled, only remembering him as a figure without nuance. It also happens that Fiona has become cozy with a catatonic, wheelchair-bound man named Aubrey (Michael Murphy). While attempting to get his wife to remember him, Grant makes time to visit with Aubrey's wife Marian (a fantastic Olympia Dukakis) to see what her side is like.

Continue reading: Away From Her Review

Strange Behavior Review


Weak
Why are you hearing about this 1981 film today? Not because of director and co-writer Michael Laughlin, whose career may have ended after he wrote the notorious Town & Country in 2001.

No, the other writer was Bill Condon, who not only wrote Gods and Monsters, he also wrote the script for Chicago (not that that's such a Herculean effort). So riding on Condon's rising star comes his first film, made when little Bill was just 26 years old. He even appears in the opening scene, sneaking a cigarette before he gets killed (in shadow) as the first of several offings.

Continue reading: Strange Behavior Review

M*A*S*H Review


Extraordinary
As its opening song tells us, suicide may be painless, but war doesn't look all that bad, either, not the way the storied M*A*S*H tells it.

M*A*S*H isn't just the most successful translation from film to TV show of all time, it's also a masterful movie in its own rite. Maybe Robert Altman's best work (and his first movie of any serious note), though he's barely associated with the film in the popular consciousness now.

Continue reading: M*A*S*H Review

The Year of Living Dangerously Review


Good
Five bucks if you can remember where and when the heralded Year of Living Dangerously is set. No, not Vietnam or Cambodia. It's actually 1965 Indonesia, when a boring assignment turns "dangerous" for Aussie journalist Guy Hamilton (Mel Gibson) when the country's revolution unexpectedly begins. Soon he's involved with a diplomat (Sigourney Weaver) when not running amok with photographer pal Billy Kwan, a half-Chinese dwarf man -- memorably played by non-Chinese, non-dwarf, non-male Linda Hunt, who deservedly won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar. The rest of the film hasn't aged nearly as well as Hunt's fun performance, though.

Salvador Review


Excellent
It's like two Hunter Thompson characters come to life. In Oliver Stone's harrowing Salvador, James Woods and James Belushi play two real-life guys named Richard Boyle and "Doctor Rock." Boyle's a down on his luck journalist (I mean way down). Rock's a San Francisco deejay. Together they take El Salvador by storm in an unforgettable musical!

Okay, scratch that last bit. Salvador is actually a gripping docu-drama about the horrors of the revolution in that country in the mid-1980s. From raped nuns to the mass dumping of dead bodies, Stone's gaze is unflinching on the horrors that occurred, and Wood's Boyle is there to document it all, despite an utter lack of charisma, money, or morality.

Continue reading: Salvador Review

McCabe & Mrs. Miller Review


Good
Robert Altman's only Western takes a long time to get heated up, but in its final hour it truly burns. As John McCabe, Warren Beatty is terrific as a hustler who's built a reputation for himself as a gunslinging tough guy, though secretly he's really a coward who's never killed anyone. After opening a smash-hit brothel in a wintry village, a big cartel swoops in to buy him out. He refuses, and a price is quickly put upon his head.

Continue reading: McCabe & Mrs. Miller Review

Nashville Review


Weak
Call me a heathen. I don't like Nashville.

Possibly the most celebrated film of the 1970s -- at least among film snob circles -- Robert Altman's sprawling case study of five days in the Tennessee city is self-absorbed, overwrought, and dismissive. Nor is it particularly well-made, with poor sound (even after being remastered for its DVD release) and washed-out photography, not to mention a running time (2:40) that's at least an hour too long.

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Kansas City Review


Grim
Every time Robert Altman makes a movie, it becomes the thing to do for the Hollywood acting community. It happened with The Player. It happened with Short Cuts. It happened with Ready to Wear. And it happened with Kansas City.

The only problem is that The Player was the last of his films that was really all that great. While Kansas City marks a slight improvement over Ready to Wear, that ain't saying much because, after all, so does Showgirls.

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Childstar Review


OK
In this smart but inconsistent look at the concept of celebrity, Canadian indie favorite Don McKellar pulls triple-duty -- writing, directing, and starring -- for the first time in seven years. That year, 1998, McKellar caught the eye of the international film audience with his end-of-the-world diary Last Night, and the ambitious epic The Red Violin, which he co-wrote. In comparison to those fine contributions, Childstar is lightweight stuff and sub-par McKellar.

Having conceived the idea for Childstar after a chance Oscar party conversation with Haley Joel Osment, McKellar stars as Rick, an experimental filmmaker who becomes the limo driver for Taylor Brandon Burns (great name!) a spoiled 12-year-old American superstar (Mark Rendall) shooting a new film in Canada. That movie, The First Son, is a ridiculous piece of jingoistic drivel where the President's son kicks some terrorist ass in order to save Dad, the White House and the whole damn country.

Continue reading: Childstar Review

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