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Michael Moore - The 20th Annual Webby Awards - New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 17th May 2016

Michael Moore
Michael Moore

Michael Moore - 'Taxi Driver' 40th Anniversary Celebration during 2016 Tribeca Film Festival at The Beacon Theatre at Tribeca Film Festival, Beacon Theatre - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 21st April 2016

Michael Moore

Michael Moore - Cast reunite for 40th Anniversary for special screening of 'Taxi Driver' at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival, presented by AT&T at the Beacon Theate at Tribeca Film Festival - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 21st April 2016

Michael Moore
Michael Moore

Michael Moore - "Joy" New York Premiere - Red Carpet Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Monday 14th December 2015

Michael Moore

Michael Moore - World premiere of 'Joy' at the Ziegfeld Theatre - Red Carpet Arrivals at Ziegfeld Theatre - New York City, New York, United States - Sunday 13th December 2015

Michael Moore

Michael Moore - Opening night for Clever Little Lies at the Westside Theatre - Arrivals. at Westside Theatre, - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 13th October 2015

Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore

Michael Moore - Hamptons International Film Festival 2015 - 'Where To Invade Next?' - Screening at Guild Hall - East Hampton, New York, United States - Saturday 10th October 2015

Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore

Michael Moore - 40th Toronto International Film Festival - 'Where to Invade Next' - Premiere - Toronto, Canada - Friday 11th September 2015

Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore

Producer, Meghan O'Hara and Michael Moore - New York Premiere of 12-12-12 at Clearview Cinemas Ziegfeld Theater - NYC, New York, United States - Saturday 9th November 2013

Producer, Meghan O'hara and Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore
Michael Moore

Michael Moore Ministers arrive for a Cabinet meeting at 10 Downing Street Featuring: Michael Moore Where: London, United Kingdom When: 15 Jan 2013

Michael Moore
Michael Moore

SiCKO Review


Excellent
Paul Arthur recently wrote about the idea of "aesthetic ethics" in relation to documentary filmmaking in an issue of Film Comment. Arthur's argument was that aesthetic ethics are part of the visual landscape in documentary films whereas in narrative cinema the truth and ethical deliberation goes on behind closed doors. It's no small surprise that Michael Moore was name-checked specifically in the article: His manipulative theatrics have always been poised right next to his muckraker sensibilities. Returning from his Fahrenheit 9/11 (basically the catalyst for the revival of popular documentary filmmaking), Moore goes broader and more heartfelt for his latest investigation, SiCKO.

In case you've been living comfortably in a condo located under a rock, SiCKO takes the world of health-care, HMOs, and the U.S. medical system into the ring for 12 punishing rounds. Jabs are delivered by horror stories of denied claims, uppercuts delivered by an intense study of how awful our medical care is (we place 37th, right above Slovenia). The most fascinating parts deliberate the capital gains of the American medical industry, ostensibly outing the entire shindig as a capitalist enterprise rather than an aid for humanity. Reaching all the way back to Nixon's idea to privatize health care with Edgar Kaiser, Moore's portrait of the medical establishment is coal-black and more clear-eyed than he's been in years.

Continue reading: SiCKO Review

Sicko Trailer


If you want to stay healthy in America, don't get sick. 

Continue: Sicko Trailer

This Divided State Review


Excellent
When I think of mass bigotry arising out of a fundamentalist religious credo, my images go to the Taliban, the Iranian clerics, the Palestinian Hamas. Farther back in history, grand ideas about God and the power of the church led to the Inquisition and the Crusades. But, in modern times, in a modern western society? Here in the U.S. of A? Community intolerance based on religious fanaticism is unknown... isn't it?

If anyone imagines that the answer to that question is yes, this documentary stands to wipe out that rosy picture. Sadly and profoundly, the tendency in the human race to gather into groups that think themselves superior to others is alive and well in the Mormon community of Utah where, in some places, principles of democracy, inclusion, and concepts like freedom of speech just don't apply.

Continue reading: This Divided State Review

Stupidity Review


Very Good
Stupidity... now there's an idea for a documentary. I gotta say, it's fascinating, and as director Albert Nerenberg points out, in modern society we seem to be surrounded by stupidity of all kinds, all the time. Is society genuinely this inane? Or are we just being too hard on ourselves?

Nerenberg's Stupidity is a frequently fascanating but sometimes wandering work that provides some insight into the nature of dumbness. There's a history lesson here: "Idiot" and "imbecile" have specific IQ levels they correspond to, and "moron" is a whole other thing of its own. Talking heads like Bill Maher and Noam Chomsky describe stupidity in our current culture (with Jackass and George W. Bush taking the brunt of the heat), and some of the intellectual discussion here is fascinating. If nothing less, it makes you think twice when you call someone or something "stupid," because of the loadedness of the term.

Continue reading: Stupidity Review

The Corporation Review


OK
There was a popular bumper sticker last year that read: If you aren't completely appalled then you haven't been paying attention. It was most commonly seen on vehicles that also had a Kerry/Edwards sticker or the one with a simple illustration of falling bombs that read "Bush Family Values." The same sentiment could very well apply to big business -- corporations. And indeed the new documentary The Corporation wants you to make that link. The Corporation is a documentary about corporate law. Sounds boring, but not when you have talking heads like Michael Moore and Milton Friedman. It's a polemic film, biased but cutting. Think Fahrenheit 9/11 meets Wall Street.

Few words have the baggage that the word corporate does. It's gone from the economic textbooks, dry and undistinguished, to a near anathema curse. No one, whatever their profession, likes to say they are "corporate." And yet the majority of workers in the United States work for corporations. These days you're most likely to hear the word corporate bandied about as a rallying cry. It's leveled at artists who "sell out," or go "corporate." Thrown like pies at politicians with "corporate" interests. Corporate goons are the lynchpins of countless cuckold and old boy jokes. And yet corporations are stronger now than ever, driven by favorable political winds, fed by a steady stream of willing workers, and nestled deep and safe inside the American psyche.

Continue reading: The Corporation Review

Fahrenheit 9/11 Review


Very Good
During his acceptance speech at the 2002 Oscars, Michael Moore thrust himself into the political fray when he denounced the Bush administration and the war in Iraq. Some found his comments inappropriate, others found them ballsy and brash, just the sort of thing the rotund raconteur would do. Regardless of what you thought of the stunt, that night it became clear that the man who targeted General Motors in Roger & Me and the NRA in Bowling for Columbine would expose a bigger target: the President of the United States.

Moore claims his film is not really about politics. And yet, even before Fahrenheit 9/11 is released, there is already more than enough controversy to go around. Moore's film walked away with the top prize at the Cannes Film Festival, but Disney backed out of the deal to release it. While Fahrenheit eventually landed with Lions Gate, this early firestorm is just the kind of publicity Moore relishes.

Continue reading: Fahrenheit 9/11 Review

The Big One Review


Very Good
For a movie with a title like The Big One, Michael Moore's follow-up to Roger & Me is awfully small. It's a mishmash of corporate butt-kickery, political naysaying, and self-indulgence, courtesy of Moore's random walk across America during a late-'90s book tour.

Moore flies from city to city to expose the Hard Times he's become well known for. A Payday factory is shut down. Borders workers in Des Moines are getting wages deducted for a health plan that has no doctor in the city. Moore complains about vegetables on his McDonald's fish sandwich and how life went in the toilet in Flint, Michigan. He goes on a tirade (admittedly, a hysterical tirade) about how Steve Forbes (then running for president) was an alien. He gives a lot of speeches. He shepherds the unemployed (who mysteriously seem to lose their jobs the one day he's in town). And eventually he sets his sights on Phil Knight and Nike, whose outsourced manufacturing has long been rumored to be the product of child labor.

Continue reading: The Big One Review

Roger & Me Review


Extraordinary
Michael Moore used to be a nobody. You know, before he had an Oscar. Before he had a TV show. Before he got all big-headed as a cause celebre among the far far left.

Roger & Me is the movie that made Moore a sensation. It's a simple experiential documentary about the schlubby Moore as he attempts to get Roger Smith, the CEO of General Motors, to come with him to Flint, Michigan in order to see the social devastation caused by the mass layoffs there of Smith's company. It's tragic, tragic, tragic. From the countless evictions Moore rides along on to one sad moment wherein pet bunnies are revealed to be equally good on the dinner table, Smith's ride is nothing but horror when his camera is pointed on the town of Flint.

Continue reading: Roger & Me Review

Orwell Rolls In His Grave Review


Weak
As cliches go, you couldn't find a more overused and less eloquent one to use as the title of your movie than Orwell Rolls in His Grave. Alas, Robert Kane Pappas' meditation on paranoia has other flaws than its hair-tearing title.

In the wake of Fahrenheit 9/11's success, expect to see dozens of movies like this to hit the scene in short order. Orwell doesn't necessarily pillory George W. Bush, though. Pappas is keen on implicating the media as complicit in keeping the two party system alive and well and, by extension, in handing Bush the presidency.

Continue reading: Orwell Rolls In His Grave Review

Bowling For Columbine Review


Extraordinary
No one will ever accuse documentary filmmaker Michael Moore of being even-handed. In his funny, somber, anti-corporate debut, Roger & Me (1989), and his two, eat-the-rich style television series, Moore establishes his stance (the humorous left) and then makes his case, swaying all subject matter toward his ideals, and making the opposition look like idiots. The beauty of this is that Michael Moore doesn't have to be fair: He's not a network journalist; he's a gonzo moviemaker, utilizing gentle, almost lovable, guerilla tactics in an effort to make a statement and entertain. And with Bowling for Columbine, Moore does this with more skill and hard-edged comedic tone than anyone else today.

Moore's disgust for the corporate machine so proudly displayed in Roger & Me rears its head again in Bowling for Columbine, but it's just one piece of an enormously ambitious puzzle that Moore attempts to solve: Why is America such a remarkably gun-violent society?

Continue reading: Bowling For Columbine Review

Bowling For Columbine Review


OK

Point for point, I agree with just about everything mordant muckraker Michael Moore has to say in his gun violence documentary "Bowling for Columbine," but pardon me if I shoot the messenger (ooh, the horrible pun!) for his propagandist approach to the subject that comes close to crippling his credibility.

Inspired in part by the 1999 school shootings in Colorado that lend the film its title (teenage gunmen Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold went bowling before school the day they killed 12 classmates and a teacher), this film is a potent and sometimes profound bully-pulpit examination of the extent of our nation's propensity for violence, and a quest for the problem's roots. In the tradition of his General Motors-haranguing sardonic-umentary "Roger and Me," Moore travels the U.S. and Canada interviewing city officials, riding along on training missions with the Michigan militia, and opening an account at a small-town bank where free checking also comes with a free firearm (no fooling).

The man has a talent for giving his interviewees just enough rope to hang themselves, like James Nichols -- the borderline-psychotic brother of Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry Nichols -- does when he gladly volunteers that "it's an American responsibility to be armed." Soon thereafter he jokingly puts a loaded gun to his head before launching into a conspiracy diatribe that almost has him foaming at the mouth.

Continue reading: Bowling For Columbine Review

Fahrenheit 911 Review


OK

In the first 30 minutes of "Fahrenheit 9/11," Michael Moore blows his golden opportunity to make a real difference in America with his bombshell film exposing rampant Bush Administration corruption. He opens with a blitz of such cheeky sarcasm that he may well alienate and discredit himself with the very undecided and right-leaning voters he means to convert.

The theater curtain has barely opened before he's on a tear about the 2000 election being stolen -- a charge well documented elsewhere, but Moore offers only implication (Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris, in charge of vote counting, was also Bush's campaign manager in the state) without substantiation. Where are the easily available numbers that so clearly support his claim? If he can't back up the first thing he says in the movie, many skeptics will wonder, why should we believe him about anything else?

The sad thing is, we should believe. The last hour of "Fahrenheit 9/11" is so powerful, so devastating, that anyone whose mind isn't closed by the first two reels of cheap shots at Bush's character will likely leave the theater shaking with anger at the duplicity exposed, the cover-ups unmasked, the wholesale manipulation (in back rooms) and fear-mongering (on the airwaves) in the build-up to the war in Iraq, and the lies, the lies, the lies. All of this Moore documents with the kind of veracity the film needed most in the early going to hook viewers not already on his side.

Continue reading: Fahrenheit 911 Review

Lucky Numbers Review


OK

Leave it to director Nora Ephron to declaw a black comedy like "Lucky Numbers," turning it into something docile and almost sweet.

Writer and sometimes director of ubiquitous, twinkly Meg Ryan romances in the '90s ("When Harry Met Sally," "Sleepless In Seattle," "You've Got Mail"), Ephron just doesn't quite have the incisive sense of humor for this movie about a bankrupt TV weatherman whose Muprhy's Law life leads him to rig the state lottery. But goodness knows she makes a valiant effort.

John Travolta stars in "Numbers" as Russ Richards, the smarmy-charmy meteorologist for a Harrisburg, Penn. television station who milks his semi-celeb status for everything its worth (he has his own table and reserved parking at Denny's).

Continue reading: Lucky Numbers Review

Michael Moore

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Michael Moore

Date of birth

23rd April, 1954

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.82




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Michael Moore Movies

Capitalism: A Love Story Movie Review

Capitalism: A Love Story Movie Review

Moore's latest filmed essay is another raucously entertaining trawl through the darker side of America....

Capitalism: A Love Story Trailer

Capitalism: A Love Story Trailer

Watch the trailer for Capitalism: A Love Story Michael Moore's latest crusade is to discover...

SiCKO Movie Review

SiCKO Movie Review

Paul Arthur recently wrote about the idea of "aesthetic ethics" in relation to documentary filmmaking...

Sicko Trailer

Sicko Trailer

If you want to stay healthy in America, don't get sick. Following on the heels...

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Fahrenheit 9/11 Movie Review

Fahrenheit 9/11 Movie Review

During his acceptance speech at the 2002 Oscars, Michael Moore thrust himself into the political...

Bowling For Columbine Movie Review

Bowling For Columbine Movie Review

No one will ever accuse documentary filmmaker Michael Moore of being even-handed. In his...

Bowling For Columbine Movie Review

Bowling For Columbine Movie Review

Point for point, I agree with just about everything mordant muckraker Michael Moore has to...

Fahrenheit 911 Movie Review

Fahrenheit 911 Movie Review

In the first 30 minutes of "Fahrenheit 9/11," Michael Moore blows his golden opportunity to...

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