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Michael Mckean

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Michael McKean - 41st Annual Chaplin Award Gala honoring Rob Reiner - New York, New York, United States - Monday 28th April 2014

Michael Mckean
Michael Mckean
Michael Mckean

Michael McKean - Opening night of Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill at the Circle in the Square Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Sunday 13th April 2014

Michael Mckean

Michael McKean - Opening Night After Party for Broadway's "All The Way", held at Rockefeller Plaza - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Friday 7th March 2014

Michael Mckean
Michael Mckean

Michael McKean, Bryan Cranston, Brandon J. Dirden, Betsy Aidem and Eric Lenox Abrams - Opening Night of Broadway's "All The Way" starring Bryan Cranston at the Neil Simon Theatre - Curtain Call - New York, New York, United States - Friday 7th March 2014

Michael Mckean, Bryan Cranston, Brandon J. Dirden, Betsy Aidem and Eric Lenox Abrams
John Mcmartin, Bill Rauch, Michael Mckean, Bryan Cranston and Robert Schenkkan
Michael Mckean, Robert Schenkkan, Bill Rauch and Bryan Cranston
Michael Mckean, Bill Rauch and Bryan Cranston
Michael Mckean, Bryan Cranston, Brandon J. Dirden, Betsy Aidem and Eric Lenox Abrams
William Jackson Harper, Rob Campbell, Robert Petkoff, John Mcmartin, Michael Mckean and Bryan Cranston

Michael McKean, Robert Schenkkan, Bryan Cranston, Bill Rauch and Brendon J. Dirden - Meet and Greet with Broadway's All The Way, held at the Roundabout rehearsal space. - New York, New York, United States - Wednesday 22nd January 2014

Michael Mckean, Robert Schenkkan, Bryan Cranston, Bill Rauch and Brendon J. Dirden
Michael Mckean, Robert Schenkkan, Bryan Cranston, Bill Rauch and Brendon J. Dirden

Michael McKean - The Friars Club Roast of Jack Black at The Hilton Hotel in New York City - New York City, New York, United States - Friday 5th April 2013

Michael Mckean
Michael Mckean
Michael Mckean
Michael Mckean
Michael Mckean

Michael McKean and Annette O'Toole - The Texas Film Hall Of Fame Awards held at Austin Studios - Austin, Texas, United States - Thursday 7th March 2013

Michael Mckean and Annette O'toole
Michael Mckean
Michael Mckean
Michael Mckean and Annette O'toole
Michael Mckean and Annette O'toole
Michael Mckean

Elizabeth Marvel, Maryann Plunkett, Jay O. Sanders, Jason Butler Harner, Annette O, Toole, Michael McKean, Jackie Hoffman and Dakin Matthews - Elizabeth Marvel, Maryann Plunkett, Jay O. Sanders, Jason Butler Harner, Annette O’Toole, Michael McKean, Jackie Hoffman and Dakin Matthews Monday 1st October 2012 attending the benefit reading of 'A Thurber Carnival' to celebrate the opening of the Pearl Theatre, held at The Pearl Theatre

Elizabeth Marvel, Maryann Plunkett, Jay O. Sanders, Jason Butler Harner, Annette O, Toole, Michael Mckean, Jackie Hoffman and Dakin Matthews
Maryann Plunkett, Elizabeth Marvel, Michael Mckean and The Pearl Theatre
Elizabeth Marvel, Maryann Plunkett, Jay O. Sanders and Jason Butler Harner
Annette O, Toole, Maryann Plunkett, Jason Butler Harner, Jay O. Sanders, Elizabeth Marvel, Michael Mckean, Jackie Hoffman and Dakin Matthews

Michael McKean Monday 21st May 2012 The 57th Annual 'Village Voice' Obie Awards Ceremony held at Webster Hall

Michael Mckean

Michael McKean - Michael McKean and Annette O'Toole Monday 23rd April 2012 Broadway opening night of 'The Lyons' at the Cort Theatre – Arrivals

Michael Mckean

Joshua (2007) Review


Good
Shot in wide-angled lens, the apartment in which the Cairn family resides could be any market-trading, publisher-dictating, money-horny Manhattanite's family bungalow. The rooms have respectably high ceilings, there's space for a big ol' piano, and there's even enough room for one of those nifty new fridges with enough compartments to be able to fit tons of leftovers from the Tribeca Grill. The halls look shadowy, and in the daytime the sun comes in basically as a vomit-colored fog. Only in an apartment with this sort of eerie ambience could a so-creepy-maybe-he's-the-devil child like Joshua Cairn be brought up by his insanely yuppie parents.

Director George Ratliff's shift into narrative cinema isn't completely unlike his hair-raising Trinity Church documentary Hell House. Though intriguingly unexplored, the idea of religious fundamentalism gets breached in a scene when the young Joshua (Jacob Kagon) takes a trip to church with his grandmother (Celia Weston). He later announces that he is prepared to accept Christ; his mother (Vera Farmiga) responds by reminding her mother-in-law and Joshua that she is a "big, fat Jew". The father (Sam Rockwell) takes his son's eccentricities and disturbing statements ("you don't have to love me") with a shambling good nature, only truly breaking down when the family dog dies. In a wicked twist, Ratliff only hints at the father's possible infidelity and revels in the lame AM radio rock he sings as he enters his apartment palace.

Continue reading: Joshua (2007) Review

100 Mile Rule Review


Weak
In case you're wondering, the titular "100 Mile Rule" is that if you're more than 100 miles away from home, you can do whatever you want (i.e. cheat on your wife) and it doesn't count. This funny-err-sorta setup quickly gives way to an odd blackmail scheme, as one of the girls our three businessmen encounter threatens to tell the wife about their dalliance. The schizophrenic flick is derivative, scattered, and awfully familiar. Even a strangely cast Michael McKean can't elevate it from the late-night cable fare it's destined to be.

Never Again Review


Weak
From American Pie to Porky's, most sex comedies entice audiences with gorgeous juveniles, raging hormones, dirty humor, and lots of gratuitous nudity. Never Again twists the genre and buries the juvenile clichés...but, unfortunately, it isn't a pleasant change. All the sex stays, but the film replaces the juveniles with wrinkly senior citizens. I never thought I'd say this, but I'd much rather watch teens poking their genitals into fruit pies!

Indeed, it is truly as disgusting as it sounds: a sex comedy with old people. Yuk! The movie, on the other hand, argues that young people aren't the only sexually active people in society. That's true; I'm sure old people have sex all the time. Heck, they can screw three times a day for all I care. But please, for the love of God, keep it off the silver screen!

Continue reading: Never Again Review

My First Mister Review


Good
Looking back, My First Mister started to fall apart when John Goodman was first introduced as a pot-smoking, long-haired hippie remnant from The Big Lebowski. After that a terminal illness surfaces, then a character goes on a road trip, where the seeds of love are planted.

Somewhere between the first and second event I sighed in frustration. Another perfectly good movie gets ruined because of an extended trip into Clicheville. For a good fifty minutes or so, My First Mister rarely makes a mistake in detailing the friendship between a middle-aged, repressed clothing store manager Randall (Albert Brooks) and his 17-year-old Goth employee, Jennifer (Leelee Sobieski).

Continue reading: My First Mister Review

Best In Show Review


Extraordinary
Just when you thought the mockumentary had mocked everything worth mocking, here comes a new gem of the genre that will have you rolling in the aisles once again.

Up for skewering this time around is the dog show, as Best in Show takes the absolutely inane shenanigans of dog breeders and handlers, impaling their obsession with a caliber of wit unseen since This is Spinal Tap made rock gods look like buffoons.

Continue reading: Best In Show Review

The Big Picture Review


Extraordinary
This tragically underrated look at Hollywood isn't exactly realistic (if it was this easy to become a celebrity director, I'd quit this gig in a heartbeat), but damn if it isn't funny as hell. From the twisted mind of Christopher Guest, who undoubtedly has a few Hollywood tales of his own to tell, The Big Picture takes us through one man's (Kevin Bacon) brief ride from the top of the Hollywood heap to the bottom and back to the top again, all carried by an absurd wave of hype. Dozens of A-listers appear in roles large and small, none of whom quite approaches the hysterical level of Martin Short as Bacon's effeminate agent.

The Hunchback Of Notre Dame II Review


Bad
Our pal Quasimodo finds love of his own in this abortive and unbearably lazy sequel to Disney's moderate success, The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Unlike mostly no-name productions like The Return of Jafar, the entire original cast is back in this sequel (with the exception of Mary Wickes, who died before the original Hunchback was ever released), and how Disney convinced them to take part is beyond me. (Iron-clad contract or the promise that, after all, this will barely take an hour of their time?)

Continue reading: The Hunchback Of Notre Dame II Review

That Darn Cat Review


Weak
Barely amusing, this remake of the Disney kiddie flick features an (inadvertent) crime-fighting cat, Christina Ricci, and the near-instant cinematic meltdown of Doug E. Doug. The story and the performances are universally appropriate for The Disney Channel fare -- which is to say, they are far from good. I suppose this would be fine to plop a kid in front of for an hour and a half, but is that saying much? Try something with animated animals instead.

With Friends Like These... Review


OK
Hollywood farces are always hard to pull off, and this one-joke movie proves increasingly frustrating despite a few bright moments. Robert Costanzo stars as an out-of-work character actor in L.A. who gets the call to read for the part of Al Capone in an upcoming Scorsese film. Of course, he blabs to all his friends and soon enough, they're all up for the part. Most of the film's scenes are predicated by "You gotta promise not to tell anyone..." and of course they invariably do. But backstabbing has never been more repetitive. By the time Scorsese makes his cameo appearance, give yourself a point if you still care who gets the part. Watch for Bill Murray in a stellar yet miniscule role.

Teaching Mrs. Tingle Review


OK
Once upon a time there was a writer named Kevin, who wanted to make a big splash in Hollywood. He wrote a movie called Killing Mrs. Tingle, which didn't sell, so he tried again. The next time he wrote a movie called Scream, which single-handedly revived the horror genre, paving the way for big horror flicks... and even small ones like The Blair Witch Project.

And then he made a TV show called Dawson's Creek, which was also a huge success. And another horror flick. And Scream 2. And then this writer was the hottest thing on Sunset Blvd., and even Killing Mrs. Tingle started to look good. Miramax bought it. They even let the guy direct.

Continue reading: Teaching Mrs. Tingle Review

Planes, Trains & Automobiles Review


Essential
In 1987 John Hughes took a huge risk. The man who had spent three years profiling the lives of teenagers did the unthinkable: He wrote and directed two movies featuring adults: She's Having a Baby and Planes, Trains & Automobiles.

She's Having a Baby is a pleasant comedy, but PTA is an absolute gem and one of the 1980s' most overlooked movies, a mixture of human drama and dizzying goofiness that qualifies it for timeless status. I should know. A co-worker and I continually quote lines from this 17-year-old movie. At this point we could audition for a remake.

Continue reading: Planes, Trains & Automobiles Review

D.A.R.Y.L. Review


Very Good
Do guilty pleasures get any more guilty or any more pleasurable than 1985's D.A.R.Y.L., the famed robo-kid flick?

I think not.

Continue reading: D.A.R.Y.L. Review

The Brady Bunch Movie Review


Excellent
Did I grow up Brady? Did I! One of the first of the 1970s TV series to get the big-screen treatment, The Brady Bunch Movie remains virtually the only successful film from that genre -- one that studios continue to experiment in with disastrous results. (Full disclosure: We here at filmcritic.com are rabidly fanatical for Josie and the Pussycats.)

But Brady -- the movie -- does everything right, balancing faithfulness with the original film with rib-jabbing at its family-friendly kitsch. The catch: The Bradys are updated to the 1990s, but they haven't changed a bit. The plot itself -- about a plan to put a mini-mall in place of the Brady block -- is a throwaway. It's just an excuse to set us up with endless Brady antics, from Cindy's tattling to Peter's voice changing, to Johnny Bravo. If all this means something to you, the film will be nothing short of hilarious. If it's meaningless to you, just look at what you missed!

Continue reading: The Brady Bunch Movie Review

A Mighty Wind Review


Excellent
Christopher Guest's latest feature A Mighty Wind is purely and gloriously Guestian. If you've seen his last two films, Waiting for Guffman and Best in Show, you know exactly what I mean by that.

For the rest of you, Guestian movies are mockumentaries that usually send up some peculiar topic (community theater, dog shows), star a troupe of the same handful of very talented comedy actors (with a heavy Second City bias), are for the most part improvised, are always directed by Christopher Guest, and are typically hilarious. Also, they all apparently have three-word titles. Yes, Guestian films follow a formula, but yet they end up being some of the most original, creative movies I ever get to see. And, A Mighty Wind, while not the best of Guest's trio of ensemble comedies, is no exception; it's definitely Guestian all the way.

Continue reading: A Mighty Wind Review

This Is Spinal Tap Review


Extraordinary
Perhaps the first, and certainly the best, entry into the mockumentary genre. Spinal Tap is responsible for so many American aphorisms (like "turn it up to 11") that it ought to be in the National Film Registry. Insanely funny.

Continue reading: This Is Spinal Tap Review

True Crime Review


Very Good
How'd I miss this one on the big screen? True Crime may have that feel of typical Clint Eastwood-self-promotion, but it is ultimately a considerably gripping meditation on the press and its role in the legal system. While elements feel a bit too much like Dead Man Walking, some excellent performances by Eastwood, Leary, and Woods make this a film worth watching. The story can be tepid and predictable at times, but overall it's a credible stab at crafting a legal thriller.

Slap Her, She's French Review


Very Good
Slap me, I liked it.

If the farcical title for actress-turned-director Melanie Mayron's Slap Her, She's French doesn't scare you away, there's a chance the worn-out premise will. Don't let it. With tongue planted firmly in cheek, Mayron and her bubbly cast of newcomers deliver a delectable little treat that's sunny, funny, and far more intelligent than you'd expect.

Continue reading: Slap Her, She's French Review

A Mighty Wind Review


OK

Writer-director Christopher Guest -- king of the mockumentary genre -- returns to his musical oddball roots in "A Mighty Wind," a "This Is Spinal Tap" for the 1960s folk-pop crowd.

As amusingly deadpan as 2000's dog-show-spoofing "Best In Show" and 1997's community-theater send-up "Waiting for Guffman" -- and featuring many of the same actors -- Guest's new film is similarly quirky, ironic and inexplicably endearing as it follows the preparations for a big concert featuring the reunions of several aging, corny, melodiously mellow fictional folk bands that were never as harmonious off stage as they were on.

It's a picture packed with wonderfully pokerfaced performances from the likes of Michael McKean, Harry Shearer, Eugene Levy, Catherine O'Hara, Bob Balaban, Fred Willard, Parker Posey and Guest himself -- most of whom play washed-up but unnervingly (sometimes unnaturally) chipper singer-songwriters. It features a steady stream of Guest's hilarious non-sequiturs (references to Shetland pony polo leagues and a low-budget record label that saved money by not putting holes in the center of its LPs) that are sure to please fans of his other flippant flicks.

Continue reading: A Mighty Wind Review

True Crime Review


Good

As a director, Clint Eastwood has one of the sweetestdeals in Hollywood. He gets to make big budget films with no interferencefrom the suits at Warner Bros., the studio with which he has a relationship.

If Clint wants a long movie, he makes a long movie. IfClint wants to dedicate a whole scene to Clint playing apologetic regret,he dedicates a whole scene to it. As such his movies tend to be self-indulgent,and "True Crime" is definitely self-indulgent.

It's also peppered with glaring "yeah, right!"moments, like the scene in which a 23-year-old Oakland Tribune reportersuccumbs to the considerably aged and pickled Eastwood "charm."

Continue reading: True Crime Review

The Guru Review


OK

Making fun of its own light comedy clichés (like its must- stop- the- girl- from- marrying- the- wrong- guy finale) could have added an extra layer of laughs to a movie like "The Guru" -- if it wasn't entirely dependent on those same clichés to drive its plot.

Amiable, boy-faced Indian actor Jimi Mistry (seen in the imports "East is East" and "The Mystic Masseur") plays an enthusiastic immigrant named Ramu Gupta who comes to America with wide-eyed dreams of stardom, born of his jones for the movie musical "Grease." But through a series of screwball misunderstandings, he's soon being celebrated by Manhattan's trendy elite as "the Guru of Sex" -- a spiritual healer who tells the people what they want to hear: nookie makes good therapy.

Ramu gets all the sexual philosophy that's making him famous (he's soon appearing on "Sally Jesse Raphael") from a good-hearted porno actress (Heather Graham) he met when he mistakenly wandered into the wrong kind of audition. But in one of those ham-fisted movie mix-ups that could be corrected with a single line of dialogue, she thinks she's advising him on how to overcome performance anxiety and become an X-rated stud, and therefore shares her innermost sexual secrets.

Continue reading: The Guru Review

Michael Mckean

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Michael McKean Movies

The Meddler Trailer

The Meddler Trailer

Marnie Minervini recently lost her husband. The couple were very much in love and did...

The Words Trailer

The Words Trailer

Rory Jansen is a young writer who is failing to achieve any kind of literary...

Whatever Works Trailer

Whatever Works Trailer

Watch the trailer for Whatever WorksEveryone's favourite cynic Larry David takes the lead role in...

Joshua (2007) Movie Review

Joshua (2007) Movie Review

Shot in wide-angled lens, the apartment in which the Cairn family resides could be any...

Never Again Movie Review

Never Again Movie Review

From American Pie to Porky's, most sex comedies entice audiences with gorgeous juveniles, raging hormones,...

My First Mister Movie Review

My First Mister Movie Review

Looking back, My First Mister started to fall apart when John Goodman was first introduced...

Best In Show Movie Review

Best In Show Movie Review

Just when you thought the mockumentary had mocked everything worth mocking, here comes a new...

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