Michael Caine

Michael Caine

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Biography

Sir Michael Caine CBE (born Maurice Joseph Micklewhite Jr., 14.3.1933) Michael Caine is an Oscar and BAFTA Award winning British actor. He has appeared in more than 100 films.

Childhood: Michael Caine was born in the Rotherhithe area of London, to Ellen Frances Marie (a cook) and Maurice Joseph Micklewhite Sr. (a fish market worker). Although Maurice Sr. was a Catholic, his son was raised in the Protestant tradition, like his mother.

During World War II, Caine attended Wilson's Grammar in Camberwell and was evacuated to Norfolk. In 1952, he did his National Service in the Royal Fusiliers and served in both Germany and Korea.

Acting Career: Caine's first stage name was Michael Scott, until his agent informed him that somebody was already using that name. Under pressure to choose a new name, he took his name from The Caine Mutiny, which was showing in Leicester Square at the time.

Caine initially got walk-on parts at the Carfax Theatre but in 1964, he was cast in Zulu. As an actor, he stood out, for his Cockney accent, which was incongruous amongst the traditional received pronunciation that actors used at the time. Shortly after Zulu, Caine appeared in The Ipcress File, perhaps one of his most famous roles, along with Alfie, released in 1966.

He then reprised his role from The Ipcress File in four sequels, Funeral In Berlin (1966), Billion-Dollar Brain (1967), Bullet to Beijing (1995) and Midnight in St. Petersburg (1995).

Michael Caine rounded off the 1960s with his iconic role in The Italian Job, alongside Noel Coward. His first film of the 1970s was Get Carter, a British gangster movie and in 1972, starred alongside Sir Laurence Olivier in Sleuth. Three years later, he shared screen time with Sean Connery in The Man Who Would Be King.

The 1980s were not such a successful period for Caine and he has since admitted that he undertook a number of low-quality projects, simply for the money. Films such as The Swarm, Beyond the Poseidon Adventure and The Hand were all commercial failures. However, he still managed to pull off some decent performances in this era, such as his BAFTA winning appearance in Educating Rita in 1983. In 1986, Caine won an Oscar for his role in Hannah and her Sisters.

During the 1990s, Michael Caine took the role of Scrooge in Muppet Christmas Carol which is frequently re-shown on TV over the festive period and his role in Little Voice, alongside Jane Horrocks, won him a Golden Globe Award. His second Oscar came for his role in The Cider House Rules, released in 1999. In the recent remake of Alfie, Jude Law took Caine's old role, whilst Caine himself took the role originally played by Laurence Olivier. In Christopher Nolan's Batman adaptations, Caine was cast as Alfred Pennyworth, Bruce Wayne's butler.

In 1993, Michael Caine was awarded a CBE for services to drama. Seven years later, he was knighted, using his birth name, which he has never surrendered.

Personal Life: Between 1955 and 1958, Michael Caine was married to Patricia Haines, an actress. The couple had one daughter together, Dominique. In 1973, Caine married Shakira Baksh, an actress and a model. They also have one daughter together, Natasha.



Biography by Contactmusic.com

Michael Caine Despairs at 'Discotheques' at Cannes Film Festival


Michael Caine Cannes Film Festival

Sir Michael Caine may have won over the famously stubborn audience at the Cannes Film Festival with his latest movie Youth, but the 82-year-old had admitted feeling his age as the annual bash becomes more of a "circus".

Michael CaineMichael Caine turns in a stellar performance in Youth

Caine is in town to promote Paolo Sorrentino's movie with his co-stars Rachel Weisz, Harvey Keitel and Jane Fonda, though the Get Carter star isn't as enamoured with the festival as his younger contemporaries. 

Continue reading: Michael Caine Despairs at 'Discotheques' at Cannes Film Festival

68th Annual Cannes Film Festival

Michael Caine - A variety of stars were photographed at the 68th Annual Cannes Film Festival as they attended a photo call for 'Youth' in Cannes, France - Wednesday 20th May 2015

Michael Caine
Michael Caine and Rachel Weisz
Michael Caine and Rachel Weisz
Michael Caine and Rachel Weisz
Michael Caine

'Kingsman' Sequel In The Works


Colin Firth Samuel L Jackson Michael Caine Taron Egerton Matthew Vaughn

Having quietly accumulated global box office takings of over $400 million, the successful spy adventure film Kingsman: The Secret Service has apparently been given the green light for a sequel.

According to movie news website The Wrap, sources closely involved with the film have strongly hinted that a follow-up is in development at Fox. While there’s not been an official confirmation by the studio, any timetable or suggestions of who will appear in it, a sequel would make sense given the huge interest shown in the first one.

Samuel L Jackson, Michael Caine and Taron Egerton starred alongside leading man Colin Firth in the surprise hit from earlier this year, which was an adaptation of a comic book by Dave Gibbons and Mark Millar entitled ‘The Secret Service’.

Continue reading: 'Kingsman' Sequel In The Works

Stonehearst Asylum Review


Good

An arch approach makes this bonkers thriller rather enjoyable, even if it never quite cracks the surface. The story comes from the Edgar Allan Poe story The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether, written in 1845, so director Brad Anderson (The Call) has fashioned the movie as bit of riotous Victorian mental institution nuttiness. Cue the mad-eyed acting, gothic production design and ludicrously batty plot. But if you take it for what it is, it's pretty entertaining.

It takes place in December 1999, as the new century is about to dawn and young doctor Edward (Jim Sturgess) arrives at Stonehearst Lunatic Asylum in a freakishly isolated corner of England. Instantly smitten with the inmate Eliza (Kate Beckinsale), Edward struggles to concentrate on the tasks given to him by his sinister boss Silas (Ben Kingsley), while being constantly watched over by the glowering groundsman Mickey Finn (David Thewlis). Silas' revolutionary system of treatment involves indulging the patients in their specific delusions, which has created a deranged sense of community in the sprawling hospital. Then one night stumbling around in the darkness, Edward discovers a group of people locked in prison cells in the basement, and their leader Benjamin (Michael Caine) claims to be the true head doctor. Yes, the inmates have taken over the asylum!

This premise allows the cast to indulge in a variety of hilariously shifty performances, hamming up every scene with constant innuendo. There isn't anyone in this place who looks remotely sane. Sturgess is fine as the dull Edward, while Beckinsale keeps her character's madness just out of sight, so both of them pale in this colourful company. Kingsley and Caine camp it up marvellously, while Thewlis adds a strong sense of menace and Sophie Kennedy Clark almost steals the film as an amusingly sex-mad virginal nurse. It's also worth watching the background players, as each has a ball his or her brand of craziness.

Continue reading: Stonehearst Asylum Review

Richard Attenborough Memorial

Sir Michael Caine and Shakira Caine - Richard Attenborough memorial service held at Westminster Abbey - Departures. - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 17th March 2015

Richard Attenborough Memorial

Sir Michael Caine and Shakira Caine - Richard Attenborough memorial service held at Westminster Abbey - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 17th March 2015

Sir Michael Caine and Shakira Caine
Sir Michael Caine and Shakira Caine
Sir Michael Caine and Shakira Caine
Sir Michael Caine and Shakira Caine
Sir Michael Caine and Shakira Caine

Memorial service for Lord Richard Attenborough at Westminster Abbey

Sir Michael Caine and Sir John Hurt - Memorial service for Lord Richard Attenborough at Westminster Abbey - Arrivals at Westminster Abbey - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 17th March 2015

Sir Michael Caine
Sir Michael Caine
Sir Michael Caine
Sir Michael Caine
Sir Michael Caine and Sir John Hurt

Video - 'Now You See Me: The Second Act' Seen Filming In London


Filming for the upcoming sequel 'Now You See Me: The Second Act' was seen taking place in London. In the scene that was filmed, one member of the cast was seen performing street magic in the rain, with one of his final tricks being to stop the rain entirely.

Continue: Video - 'Now You See Me: The Second Act' Seen Filming In London

Kingsman: The Secret Service Review


Excellent

With virtually the same tone as they used in their superhero spoof Kick-Ass, filmmakers Matthew Vaughn and Jane Goldman take another riotously adult approach to pastiche, this time tackling the James Bond genre. Essentially they have made a 007 movie that refuses to tone itself down for the PG-13 audience, indulging in the profanity and excessive violence other films shy away from. So it doesn't really matter if the plot itself isn't quite as rebellious as it pretends to be.

Kingsman is a top-secret spy agency located in a Saville Row tailor, beholden to no corporation or government. Led by Arthur and Merlin (Michael Caine and Mark Strong), these gentlemanly super-agents use the names of the knights of the Round Table. And when one of them dies, they know it's time to get with the times and recruit someone young and hip. So they set up a rigorous school for trainees, with one lucky graduate set to earn a spot at the table. Harry, aka Galahad (Colin Firth), chooses rough East End teen Eggsy (Taron Egerton) as his candidate. The son of a former agent, Eggsy shows considerable promise even if he lacks the expected refinement. Then just before the final selection is made, they discover that mobile phone billionaire Valentine (Samuel L. Jackson) is up to something nefarious. So Eggsy and fellow rookie Roxy (Sophie Cookson) kick into action to figure out what he's up to, and stop him.

Despite constant reminders that "this isn't that kind of movie", it clearly is. Every Bond element is here, including the crazed villain with an elaborate lair and a technically augmented sidekick (Sofia Boutella's vicious blade-footed henchwoman Gazelle). The only difference is that where Bond hints cheekily at violence and sex, Vaughn and Goldman go for it. This film is packed with outrageous, over-the-top carnage and intensely rude dialogue, delivered with relish by the expert cast. Firth, Caine and Strong are terrific at combining tweedy propriety with public schoolboy naughtiness, while Jackson merrily plays around with Valentine's god-complex.

Continue reading: Kingsman: The Secret Service Review

Interstellar Is A New Genre For Nolan


Christopher Nolan Anne Hathaway Matthew Mcconaughey Michael Caine Jessica Chastain Robin Williams Al Pacino

Over the past 15 years, Christopher Nolan has proven himself as a master of intelligent filmmaking, generally sticking to the psychological thriller genre while mixing in action and brain-bending flourishes. And now with Interstellar he has left the confines of Earth's gravity to head into science-fiction for the first time.

Matthew McConaughey & Anne Hathaway on setMatthew Mcconaughey & Anne Hathaway on set

Intriguingly, Nolan has still maintained his commitment to in-camera effects even in this genre, refusing to indulge in flashy digital trickery just because he can. Like his last few films, he has also shot portions of the film in Imax, massive screen imagery photographed on film, not digitally, which gives the entire movie an earthy texture that's intriguingly realistic. This also focusses even the most existential and scientific discussions squarely on the characters.

Continue reading: Interstellar Is A New Genre For Nolan

Interstellar Review


Good

Brainy blockbuster maestro Christopher Nolan heads into deep space with this epic adventure, which is packed with thoughtful ideas and big emotions even if the plot wobbles badly in the middle. But although it ultimately feels somewhat forced, the film is still a mesmerising exploration of parenthood and survival, bending time and gravity in ways that keep our brains spinning. And the seamless visual effects combine with some wrenching performances to make it unmissable.

It opens in a future America where a desperation for food has overtaken the need for technology and innovation. Which is a problem for Nasa pilot Cooper (Matthew McConaughey), who is now working a massive corn farm that he runs with his father (John Lithgow). Then Cooper and his daughter Murph (Mackenzie Foy) discover a gravitational anomaly that leads them to a secret base run by father and daughter scientists Brand and Amelia (Michael Caine and Anne Hathaway), who are looking for a new home planet for humanity since Earth is dying. So Cooper joins up and heads through a wormhole with Amelia and crew (Wes Bentley and David Gyasi). Meanwhile, Murph (who grows up to be Jessica Chastain) gets involved in the project back on earth, wondering if her dad will ever return home as he promised.

The first act of the story is a beautiful depiction of yearning for discovery, that innate curiosity that drives people to do crazy things in the hopes of pushing the humanity forward (or in this case, saving it). Nolan directs this section beautifully, with sharp editing propelling the story out into space with real energy and passion. But once they begin visiting other planets, there are some extended episodes that feel oddly contrived, including an encounter that leads to unexplained violence, explosions and melodrama. These kinds of things undermine the characters' motivations to the point where the audience just has to take Nolan's word for it and ride it out, even as the underlying ideas begin to lose their weightiness.

Continue reading: Interstellar Review

'Interstellar' UK film premiere

Sir Michael Caine and wife Shakira Caine - Photographs of the Hollywood stars as they attended the UK Premiere of Sci-Fi movie 'Interstellar' The premiere was held at the Odeon Cinema in Leicester Square, London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 29th October 2014

Sir Michael Caine

Daniel Radcliffe To Star In 'Now You See Me 2'


Daniel Radcliffe Michael Caine

Daniel Radcliffe will star in the upcoming sequel to the 2013 movie Now You See Me. The former Harry Potter star will play the son of the character played by Michael Caine in the magic / heist caper.

Daniel Radcliffe
Daniel Radcliffe will star in the upcoming movie sequel to Now You See Me as Michael Caine's son

Caine himself made the unexpected casting announcement in an interview with the movie blog Hey You Guys! “There’s a sequel to Now You See Me and we’re shooting in London,” he said. “I shoot in December, the whole of December in London, and my son is Harry Potter. I thought it’d be funny, me and Daniel Radcliffe as father and son.”

Continue reading: Daniel Radcliffe To Star In 'Now You See Me 2'

Interstellar Trailer


Mankind is doomed. Following generations of neglect and a lack of care, the planet Earth is a polluted mess and food supplies have all but run out. Only one hope remains for humanity if it is to survive into its next generation - they must leave Earth behind. Cooper (Matthew Mcconaughey), is a widowed engineer, living in a time where engineers are no longer needed. He also happens to be one of the world's best pilots. He is offered the choice to stay with his children and except the fate of the human race, or captain a mission through a newly discovered wormhole in search of a new, habitable planet which can sustain the prolonged existence of our species. He chooses the latter option, and begins his interstellar travels in search of a new home. 

Continue: Interstellar Trailer

Stonehearst Asylum Trailer


Stonehearst Asylum follows the plot of Edgar Allen Poe's short story The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether. It is a story about Edward Newgate (Jim Sturgess) - a medical school graduate in the 19th Century who travels to the titular Asylum to gain 'clinical experience'. It is here that Newgate meets Silas Lamb (Ben Kingsley) and Eliza Graves (Kate Beckinsale), the latter of which he becomes instantly infatuated with. Almost at once, things start to creepy as Edward encounters some of the inmates and realises that perhaps his new colleges are not entirely concerned with following regulations. As the plot thickens and Edward finds himself spiralling further down the rabbit hole, the questions seem pile up. Why does one of the inmates claim to be the asylum's superintendent? Why are the doctors so gleeful when using such barbaric 'treatments'? And why does the man in charge seem so adamant that 'we're all mad'?

Continue: Stonehearst Asylum Trailer

Michael Caine

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