Metallica brought forward their planned European gigs by a year over ongoing fears for the future of the Euro currency, according to their manager.
Money markets around the world are suffering in the global recession, but with ongoing issues with debt across Europe, the band is keen to hit the road as soon as possible to avoid potential problems.
The group's manager Cliff Burnstein tells the Wall Street Journal, "Look, I'm not an economist, but I have a degree, so it helps. You have to ask yourself, what's the best time to be doing what, when and where.
"Nobody is looking to make a foreign-exchange trade to make money, but you don't want to be a loser. Over the next few years, the dollar will be stronger and the euro weaker, and if that's the case, I want to take advantage of that by playing more of these (European) shows now, because they will be more profitable for us.
"Because of the exchange rates, prices in Europe are much higher, and this isn't a sustainable situation."
Metallica have already announced a string of shows in Europe for 2012, including stops in countries such as Norway, Germany and Austria.