Mena Suvari

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Women in Film Crystal and Lucy Awards 2015

Mena Suvari - Women in Film Crystal and Lucy Awards 2015 - Arrivals at Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, California, United States - Tuesday 16th June 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

Women In Film 2015 Crystal + Lucy Awards

Mena Suvari - Women In Film 2015 Crystal + Lucy Awards at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Arrivals at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 16th June 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

Women In Film 2015 Crystal Lucy Awards

Mena Suvari - Women In Film 2015 Crystal + Lucy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 16th June 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

Step Up Women's Network 12th Annual Inspiration Awards

Mena Suvari - Step Up Women's Network 12th Annual Inspiration Awards - Arrivals at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Friday 5th June 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

12th Annual Inspiration Awards red carpet luncheon at The Beverly Hilton Hotel

Mena Suvari - 12th Annual Inspiration Awards red carpet luncheon at The Beverly Hilton Hotel, to benefit Step Up Women's Network at Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 5th June 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

The Ten Worst Films of 2012


Oliver Stone Taylor Kitsch Noel Clarke Mena Suvari Ben Stiller Vince Vaughn Dougray Scott Jodie Whittaker Zac Efron Taylor Schilling Victoria Justice Emile Hirsch Max Minghella Danny Devito

Most of these movies feature actors, actresses and filmmakers who really should know better...

Savages Still1. Savages

This heavy-handed drug-war thriller proves that Oliver Stone has lost the ability to tell a balanced story. And the all-star cast seems clueless about why they're here. Except a vamping Salma Hayek.

Continue reading: The Ten Worst Films of 2012

The Knot Review


Terrible

Clearly intent on being a British Hangover/Bridesmaids hybrid, this comedy romp doesn't contain a single laugh. It doesn't help that all of the characters (except perhaps one) are deeply unlikeable, or that the humour is literally centred in the toilet. You have to wonder if anyone read the script before they started making the movie. Or maybe the filmmakers made it up as they went along.

It begins on the morning of a wedding, as bride Alex (Riley) and her bridesmaids (Suvari, Fielding and others) begin to get ready for the ceremony. Meanwhile, groom Jeremy (McNulty) wakes up to a series of pranks staged by his groomsmen (Clarke, Maza and others), plus threats from a crazed ex. Both of them have torturous routes to the church, with obstacles in the form of bodily functions, car crashes, a trip to the emergency room and general idiocy. Maybe these two shouldn't be tying the knot after all.

At least a few of the characters register as real human beings. Goldstein's hapless, hairy groomsman has some vaguely diverting moments that, if not actually funny, have a bit of originality to them due to the actor's full-on physicality. And Fielding's unhappy bridesmaid takes an interesting journey of self-discovery, even though she's subjected to a corny physical gag. Even so, the only likeable character is Riley's bride, who's a genuinely nice person with some depth. Everyone else is mindlessly self-involved and stereotypical, and most of the cast overact their characters into caricatures.

Continue reading: The Knot Review

American Reunion [aka American Pie: Reunion] Review


Grim
Call this a missed opportunity. While there's plenty of scope to have fun with these characters as they hit 30, this script is simply not up to the job. It's never very funny, has no sense of momentum and only comes to life due to the endearing characters and the likeable actors who play them.

It's the class of 1999's 13th reunion (huh?), so the entire gang returns to East Great Falls. Jim and Michelle (Bigs and Hannigan) now have a 2-year-old son, which has interrupted their sex life; Oz (Klein) is a B-list TV star with a supermodel girlfriend (Bowden); the now-married Kevin is worried about rekindling his high school romance with Vicky (Reid); Finch (Thomas) is a world traveler who clicks with Michelle's band camp pal Selena (Ramirez). And then there's party-boy prankster Stifler (Scott), who hasn't changed at all and leads them into all manner of trouble.

Continue reading: American Reunion [aka American Pie: Reunion] Review

Stuck Review


Extraordinary
Sometimes you're the windshield; sometimes you're the bug. But in Stuart Gordon's thoroughly nasty horror/comedy parable of the Bush era, Stuck, every character is a bug on the windshield of a hateful American society, some more so than others. And others literally so.

Take Tom (Stephen Rea, channeling Norman Wisdom through a manic depressive sheen). Tom has had a bad day. Thrown out of his fleabag apartment, he hopes to wrangle a job at the unemployment office but due to a computer error, his name doesn't appear in the computer, so he is forced to roam the streets as a homeless man. When he falls asleep on a park bench, a cop wakes him up and tells him to move on. As he pushes a shopping cart in front of him, he runs into Brandi (Mena Suvari). Or more to the point, Brandi runs into him. She is returning from a club in a drug-induced haze, happy that by working on her day off for her harpy boss at the depressing retirement home she will get a promotion from her deadening job as an attendant. But calling her lunkhead boyfriend Rashid (Russell Hornsby) on her cell phone on her drive home, she neglects to look at the road and smacks into the hapless Tom, who becomes stuck in the glass windshield of the car, bleeding to death. Rather than stop her vehicle and come to Tom's assistance, she drives onward home, parking her car in her garage and hoping Tom gives up the ghost during the night so that Brandi can ditch the body and not mess up her chances at a promotion when she goes in to work the next morning. The only glitch is that Tom refuses to die.

Continue reading: Stuck Review

Brooklyn Rules Review


Grim
Oh, brother. Or, as they say it in Brooklyn, oh, brudda. You've seen Brooklyn Rules before. Many times before. A cliché-clogged and utterly unsurprising mash-up of A Bronx Tale, Goodfellas, and even Saturday Night Fever (the Verrazano Bridge looms ominously in the background of many exterior shots), this coming-of-age tale tracks three best friends from Bay Ridge as they try to make a go of life in a Mob-run neighborhood. This town is so steeped in Mafia madness that even the most casual walk in the woods will ultimately lead to a cosa nostra killing field.

As teenagers in 1985 (cue the best-of-the-'80s soundtrack), Michael (Freddie Prinze, Jr.), Carmine (Scott Caan), and Bobby (Jerry Ferrara) are veering onto different paths. Bobby is the chubby and lovable lunkhead, so stupid he fears failing the Post Office application test. Carmine is the baby goodfella, a hyper stud who takes note of the money and respect that the local bosses have and can't imagine why he shouldn't join up with their crew. And Michael is the one who wants "to get out of this hellhole." An ambitious orphan, he's stumbling through Columbia on a pre-law track and has the hots for Connecticut preppie ice queen Ellen (Mena Suvari), who finds Michael's Brooklyn background attractively "edgy."

Continue reading: Brooklyn Rules Review

Caffeine Review


Unbearable
Something's always brewing at the Black Cat Café, or so they say. The advertisers behind the new independent film Caffeine want us to believe there's plenty of activity at the quirky London café. Sadly, it's not so. In fact, it's so boring that even a double-shot espresso isn't strong enough to keep to your eyes open.

Caffeine follows a series of odd events during the lunch rush at the Black Cat Café, where one disaster after another is served up as the day's "blue plate special." For example, the cook (Callum Blue) is fired by the manager, Rachel (Marsha Thomason), after she finds out he's been unfaithful to her. Rachel has no one else qualified to cook, so she throws the chef's hat to a server named Tom (Mark Pellegrino), who can't even make lasagna from a written recipe. But Rachel has no other choices. Her two other employees, Vanessa (Mena Suvari) and Dylan (Breckin Meyer) spend more time on smoke breaks then they do serving coffee.

Continue reading: Caffeine Review

Factory Girl Review


OK
At the outset, Factory Girl looks like thin material for a biopic: It covers the life of Edie Sedgwick, a college dropout propelled to "it" girl status by Andy Warhol in the sixties, only to lose herself, as "it" people often do, to drugs and fresher faces. The movie starts with her leaving college, ends well before her death at age 28, and (intentionally or not) presents a convincing case that she didn't do much with the years in between.

But so many filmed biographies cram from childhood to old age, resulting in filmed Cliff Notes, or a mini-series at twice the speed and half the scenes. That Factory Girl doesn't have to cover an Edie Sedgwick comeback -- that she dies young and off-camera -- is a perverse relief. George Hickenlooper's brief, sometimes impressionistic film is most illuminating when showing both the allure and the casualties of Warhol's free but detached Factory scene.

Continue reading: Factory Girl Review

Stephen Tobolowsky's Birthday Party Review


Excellent
A casual search on filmcritic.com reveals the name "Tobolowsky" affiliated with at least 15 movies we've reviewed, and that's just counting the ones he had a big enough role to merit mention in the cast list.

Make this 16.

Continue reading: Stephen Tobolowsky's Birthday Party Review

Edmond Review


Grim
There's a slight chance, very slight, that David Mamet is a genius. As a writer, his blunt, edgy, and constantly interrupted dialogue has earned him a lot of weight, so much so that he is considered one of the more important playwrights of the last 25 years or so. As a director, he is precise and extremely-well calculated, if not a bit lacking in aesthetic substance and style. When he directs his own work, it tends to go remarkably smooth, as it did in the fantastic Heist and his best film, State and Main. However, when put in the hands of others, sometimes it goes exceedingly well (James Foster's Glengarry Glen Ross) or exceedingly bad (Michael Corrente's American Buffalo). The latest is a retelling of his play Edmond by King of the Ants helmer Stuart Gordon.On his way home from work, Edmond Burke (William H. Macy) decides to stop at a fortune teller. She simply tells him this: "You are not where you're supposed to be." This causes him to leave his wife (a brief Rebecca Pidgeon) and to go out on the town to get an old fashioned piece of tail, as suggested by a stranger at a bar (the reputable Joe Mantegna). He goes through strippers, booth girls and expensive call girls, played by a who's who of young actresses ranging from Mena Suvari to Denise Richards. He finally settles on a waitress (Julia Stiles) who he picks up after attacking a pimp and finding a newfound love for life. This passion, however, leads to a terrible act that lands him in jail and doing things that he was scared of before, constantly saying "every fear hides a wish."Mamet's sly style of writing somehow seems lacking here. In Glengarry, he wrote with blood and thunder about the rigorous work of real estate salesmen and in Oleanna, he split the sexual harassment debate so thinly that you couldn't see his opinion without microscope eyes. With Edmond however, he lays everything out for the audience and world to see, allowing the character to often pontificate on basic musings like what it's like to feel alive and the mundane nature of normal life. There is a serious lack of subtext that gives off the feeling of extreme annoyance.Gordon directs with a simple enough structuralism and he gives impressive terror to the climactic scene where Edmond goes over the edge. However, this simplicity also leads to a considerable loss in mood and atmosphere, which seems devoid after the excellent opening scene in the fortune teller's room. The actors, chiefly Macy and Stiles, struggle to keep the story afloat and exciting, but it's a losing battle. Reliable character actors like Bai Ling and Dylan Walsh (so good in Nip/Tuck) are given scant screen time to show their prowess, but Bokeem Woodbine works wonders as Edmond's bunkmate when he enters prison. None of this, however, allows Edmond to make more than a small ripple in the water. It's a fussy little movie that wants to be much more controversial and important than it is. Did I say those chances were very, very slight?The dead hooker's under the card in the middle.

Rumor Has It... Review


Unbearable
Rumor Has It is the only 2005 release that I walked out of. It's really that bad. I am not exaggerating.Just saw it.
Mena Suvari

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