Melanie Lynskey

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Melanie Lynskey - ELLE's Women In Television Celebration presented by Hearts on Fire Diamonds and Olay held at the Sunset Tower Hotel at Sunset Tower Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 20th January 2016

Melanie Lynskey
Melanie Lynskey
Melanie Lynskey
Melanie Lynskey

Melanie Lynskey - ELLE Women in Hollywood Awards 22nd Annual Celebration held at the Four Seasons Hotel Beverly Hills - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 19th October 2015

Melanie Lynskey
Melanie Lynskey

We'll Never Have Paris Review


Weak

Romantic comedies depend on the sympathies of an audience, but in this scruffy movie actor-filmmaker Simon Helberg (The Big Bang Theory) plays a character so relentlessly naive and self-absorbed that it's impossible to root for him. This also makes it difficult to laugh at his goofy antics, because he's more pathetic than funny. Viewers looking for something offbeat and a bit dorky may find the film somewhat charming, but it feels oddly under-developed.

Helberg plays Quinn, a 28-year-old hypochondriac who works as a florist, afraid to pursue his desired career as a jazz musician. He's only ever had one girlfriend, Devon (Melanie Lynskey), and after 10 years together feels like it's time to propose. But this thought sparks a doubt in his mind, which is fanned into a flame when his sexy work colleague Kelsey (Maggie Grace) confesses that she has a crush on him. Quinn's best pal Jameson (Zachary Quinto) isn't much help, and soon Devon has had enough with Quinn's sudden distance. So she moves to Paris to stay with family friends and get some perspective. In a state of confusion, Quinn follows her there and is shocked to discover that she has already struck up a perhaps too-close friendship with handsome violinist Guillaume (Ebon Moss-Bachrach).

Right from the start it's clear that Helberg's stammering nerd Quinn is only with Lynskey's witty-thoughtful Devon because they've known each other so long. There isn't a moment in this film when they feel even remotely suited to each other. And when Grace's slutty Kelsey throws herself at Quinn, the movie takes on a Woody Allen-style leeriness, as a geeky filmmaker makes a movie in which gorgeous women throw themselves at him. Helberg has some innate charm, but Quinn is so socially inept that it's obvious to everyone but him that he needs to go off and become a mature human being before getting into any sort of relationship.

Continue reading: We'll Never Have Paris Review

The Perks Of Being A Wallflower Review


Excellent

Spikier than the average coming-of-age movie, this astute comedy-drama is packed with memorable characters and resonant situations. It's also strikingly intelligent, refusing to accept Hollywood's fake moralising as it grapples with big issues from mental health to bullying. And even better, it's funny and sexy.

Set in the early 1990s, it's the story of the painfully shy Charlie (Lerman), who plans to blend into the background as he starts high school. Scarred by an emotional event in his past, the only new friend he makes is his English teacher (Rudd). Then his sharp wit is spotted by the colourful Patrick (Miller), an anarchic gay teen who doesn't care what people think. Patrick also has a sexy stepsister, Sam (Watson), who takes a liking to Charlie as well, and soon they become inseparable friends. Well, until Charlie loses his nerve to ask Sam out and ends up in a relationship with her friend Mary Elizabeth (Whitman) instead.

After some less-than-thrilling lead roles (such as Percy Jackson or last year's Three Musketeers remake), Lerman finally comes into his own here with a sensitive, intelligent performance that's nicely underplayed. He also has terrific chemistry with Watson and Miller, whose feisty, hilarious love of life fills every scene they're in. They make such a strong trio that we are deeply moved by each rocky shift in their friendship. And Whitman brings a sparky energy to her scenes as the Buddhist punk with a bracingly honest approach to whatever happens.

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The Perks Of Being A Wallflower Trailer


Charlie is a 15-year-old high school freshman with no friends since his best friend Michael committed suicide. He is determined to turn his average life around and become someone people notice. He succeeds, at least, in making friends with two seniors; Sam and her extremely effeminate stepbrother Patrick; who let him into their lives and try to show him a good time. He also warms to his English teacher, Bill, who regularly lends him literary texts to read and absorb. Soon, his relationship with Sam gets stronger and Charlie begins to develop feelings for her that he's never before experienced. His new found friends stand by him through high school as he comes to terms with the death of his friend, his mental illness and with who he is as a person.

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Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World Review


Excellent
There's a whiff of wilful quirkiness about this apocalyptic comedy-drama, but as the brittle humour quietly transforms into something remarkably emotional, the film gets under our skin in ways we never expect.

With an apocalyptic asteroid strike due in three weeks, Dodge (Carell) wonders why he's still going to work at his dull insurance firm. Then he runs into Penny (Knightley), distraught because she's broken up with her boyfriend (Brody). Dodge wants to revisit his childhood sweetheart, while Penny wants to see her parents in Britain. And Dodge knows someone with a plane, so they team up. Along the road, they get help from a trucker (Peterson) and Penny's survivalist ex (Luke). But with the world ending, their priorities begin to shift.

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Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World Trailer


Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World

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Melanie Lynskey - Saturday 16th January 2010 at BAFTA Beverly Hills, California

Melanie Lynskey
Melanie Lynskey

Melanie Lynskey and Jimmi Simpson - Melanie Lynskey and Jimmi Simpson Los Angeles, California - 15th Annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards at the Hollywood Palladium Friday 15th January 2010

Melanie Lynskey and Jimmi Simpson
Melanie Lynskey
Melanie Lynskey
Melanie Lynskey
Melanie Lynskey

The Informant! Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Informant!

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Melanie Lynskey - Melanie Lynsky Wednesday 3rd October 2007 at Paley Center for Media Beverly Hills, California

Melanie Lynskey
Melanie Lynskey
Melanie Lynskey
Melanie Lynskey

Shattered Glass Review


Very Good
The need to get the best story first has always been an inherent part of the news business. But when a journalist crosses the line into the realm of fictional the whole integrity of the news business is thrown out the window.

This is in essence what happened to The New Republic magazine in 1998 when a writer of theirs named Stephen Glass fabricated a story about a computer hacker to such an extent that nothing in it was true including - sorry to say - the allegation that the hacker left his mark with an appealingly humorous alliterative caption: "THE BIG BAD BIONIC BOY HAS BEEN HERE BABY." (This of course has been overshadowed by the recent Jayson Blair/New York Times scandal, which shook out nearly identically but with much greater fanfare earlier this year.)

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The Cherry Orchard Review


Very Good
Actors understandably welcome the opportunity to perform Chekhov, whose plays are painfully funny in their quiet observation of human folly. In Uncle Vanya and The Three Sisters, we recognize some part of ourselves. Renowned director Michael Cacoyannis, who helmed Zorba the Greek in 1964, assembles a powerhouse international cast for his screen interpretation of The Cherry Orchard, including Alan Bates (Gosford Park), Katrin Cartlidge (Breaking the Waves), and Melanie Lynskey (Heavenly Creatures). That great horror actor Michael Gough is well typecast as an ancient butler, and grand dame Charlotte Rampling's timeless iconic presence lends itself beautifully to the tragic Madame Lyubov Andreyevna Raneskaya.

Despite the remarkable assemblage of talent, Cacoyannis' Cherry Orchard feels self-aware of adapting a renowned classic from stage to screen. The cinematography is handsome and stately, but more appropriate to the colorful orchards and vast family estate, the 1900 costumes, the theatrical entrances and exits, than to the intimacy of Chekhov's vivid characters. (It almost makes one long for the hand-held documentary treatment of Louis Malle's seminal Vanya on 42nd Street.) The stylistic choices here take a while to get used to, especially during a drawn-out prologue, absent in the original text, as Madame Lyubov and her buoyant teenage daughter Anna (Tushka Bergen) make elaborate preparations to return to their Russian estate after a self-imposed exile. Some may be exhausted by this Masterpiece Theater treatment (lingering over every piece of luggage) before Chekhov's social entanglements kick in -- which happens shortly after the dozen major characters have assembled at their estate.

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Coyote Ugly Review


Weak
To understand the horror of Coyote Ugly is to understand how it was made.

It's 1993. Some Hollywood bigshot reads an article in GQ magazine about a nutty bar called the Coyote Ugly in Manhattan. They only have women bartenders, see, and they, like, dance on the bar with fire and stuff! And they don't serve water. If someone orders water they hose down the crowd! Holy mackerel, what a nutty place!

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Rose Red Review


Weak
Invest six hours in the DVD release of this Steven King miniseries and you'll come out... well, a lot like a guy who wasted four hours and 15 minutes on a crummy Steven King miniseries.

At its heart, the movie is a haunted house flick in the vein of recent films like House on Haunted Hill and Thirteen Ghosts, albeit one that takes a long time to get going, a long time to build up a story, and a long time to get over with. But they had a lot of commercials to sell, so who can fault them, huh?

Continue reading: Rose Red Review

Melanie Lynskey

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Melanie Lynskey Movies

We'll Never Have Paris Movie Review

We'll Never Have Paris Movie Review

Romantic comedies depend on the sympathies of an audience, but in this scruffy movie actor-filmmaker...

The Perks of Being a Wallflower Movie Review

The Perks of Being a Wallflower Movie Review

Spikier than the average coming-of-age movie, this astute comedy-drama is packed with memorable characters and...

The Perks Of Being A Wallflower Trailer

The Perks Of Being A Wallflower Trailer

Charlie is a 15-year-old high school freshman with no friends since his best friend Michael...

Seeking a Friend for the End of the World Movie Review

Seeking a Friend for the End of the World Movie Review

There's a whiff of wilful quirkiness about this apocalyptic comedy-drama, but as the brittle humour...

Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World Trailer

Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World Trailer

Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World One night, Dodge and his wife...

Touchback Trailer

Touchback Trailer

At high school, Scott Murphy was the star football player. He was also popular and...

Win Win Movie Review

Win Win Movie Review

As with The Station Agent and The Visitor, McCarthy creates a series of encounters for...

Up in the Air Movie Review

Up in the Air Movie Review

Smart and funny, this breezy and bittersweet drama carries dark resonance for a society caught...

The Informant! Movie Review

The Informant! Movie Review

Telling an outrageous true story with humour and irony, Soderbergh crafts an engaging corporate comedy-drama...

The Informant! Trailer

The Informant! Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Informant! Mark Whitacre is a successful businessman, he works at...

Up In The Air Trailer

Up In The Air Trailer

Watch the trailer for Up In The Air Ryan Bingham has spent all of his...

Away We Go Movie Review

Away We Go Movie Review

This gentle comedy examines at how we set priorities, plan our futures and make our...

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