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Mel Brooks Friday 24th September 2010 having lunch with a friend in Beverly Hills. Los Angeles, California

Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks and Cloris Leachman - Mel Brooks, Cloris Leachman Hollywood, California - Opening Night of 'Young Frankenstein' at the Pantages Theatre Tuesday 27th July 2010

Mel Brooks and Cloris Leachman
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks Friday 2nd July 2010 has lunch in Beverly Hills with friends Los Angeles, California

Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks, Son Max and grandson Henry - Mel Brooks, Son Max and grandson Henry Thursday 6th May 2010 at Egyptian Theater Los Angeles, California

Mel Brooks, Son Max and Grandson Henry
Mel Brooks, Son Max and Grandson Henry
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks and Eddie Brooks - Eddie Brooks and Mel Brooks Los Angeles, California - Mel Brooks is honoured with the 2406th star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame Friday 23rd April 2010

Mel Brooks and Eddie Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks Thursday 15th April 2010 leaving Madeo's Restaurant in Beverly Hills Los Angeles, California

Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Lesley Ann Warren and Mel Brooks Friday 24th July 2009 The Academy pays tribute to Academy Award-winning comic legend Mel Brooks held at The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills California, USA

Lesley Ann Warren and Mel Brooks
Lesley Ann Warren and Mel Brooks
Lesley Ann Warren and Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks and Susan Stroman - Mel Brooks and Susan Stroman New York City, USA - The New York Times Arts & Leisure Week featuring the cast of the Broadway musical 'Young Frankenstein' at The Times Centre Sunday 13th January 2008

Mel Brooks and Susan Stroman
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks, Susan Stroman and Roger Bart
Megan Mullally and Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks, Susan Stroman and Roger Bart
Mel Brooks and Susan Stroman

Harvey Weinstein, Mel Brooks, Nicole Kidman and Renee Zellweger Thursday 8th November 2007 New York City, USA

Harvey Weinstein, Mel Brooks, Nicole Kidman and Renee Zellweger

Roger Bart and Mel Brooks Thursday 8th November 2007 Opening Night of the new Mel Brooks musical 'Young Frankenstein' at the Hilton Theatre - Departures New York City, USA

Gene Wilder and Mel Brooks - Gene Wilder and Mel Brooks New York City, USA - Opening Night of the new Mel Brooks musical 'Young Frankenstein' at the Hilton Theatre - Curtain Call Thursday 8th November 2007

Gene Wilder and Mel Brooks
Gene Wilder and Mel Brooks
Gene Wilder and Mel Brooks
Gene Wilder and Mel Brooks
Gene Wilder and Mel Brooks
Gene Wilder and Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks - Fred Applegate with his wife Cherie Sprosty & their children Meredith, Ben & Ethan New York City, USA - Opening Night After Party celebrating the new Mel Brooks musical 'Young Frankenstein' at the Empire State Building- Arrivals Thursday 8th November 2007

Mel Brooks
Jessica Stone and Mel Brooks
Shuler Hensley and Mel Brooks
Roger Bart and Mel Brooks
David Hasselhoff and Mel Brooks
Sutton Foster and Mel Brooks

Walter Cronkite and Mel Brooks - Walter Cronkite & Joanna Simon New York City, USA - Opening Night of the new Mel Brooks musical 'Young Frankenstein' at the Hilton Theatre - Arrivals Thursday 8th November 2007

Walter Cronkite and Mel Brooks

Tony Danza, Las Vegas, Mel Brooks and The Producers - Tony Danza and Larry Raben at the Paris Hotel and Casino Las Vegas, Nevada - Tony Danza starring in the Mel Brooks musical comedy 'The Producers' - opening night Thursday 23rd August 2007

Tony Danza, Las Vegas, Mel Brooks and The Producers
Tony Danza, Las Vegas, Mel Brooks and The Producers
Tony Danza, Las Vegas, Mel Brooks and The Producers
Tony Danza, Las Vegas, Mel Brooks and The Producers
Tony Danza, Las Vegas, Mel Brooks and The Producers
Tony Danza, Las Vegas, Mel Brooks and The Producers

High Anxiety Review


Very Good
One of the reasons we film critics have a soft spot for Mel Brooks's High Anxiety is that its endless parade of campy Hitchcock gags makes us feel smart. "Oh, that's from Vertigo. Hey, that's from North by Northwest. Did you hear that? He just said MacGuffin."

Of course, it's vitally important that you be in the mood to see a Mel Brooks movie when you see a Mel Brooks movie -- any Mel Brooks movie -- because if you're not, you'll just groan, roll your eyes, and walk away. But if you're feeling silly, Mel will make you laugh, and High Anxiety keeps the zingers coming from the very first moment, when the urgent strains of the powerful orchestra accompany Dr. Richard Thorndyke (Brooks) as he walks through the airport during the opening credits. The credits end, and Thorndyke comments, "What a dramatic airport!" Later, the Los Angeles Symphony Orchestra will follow him around in a bus to add more drama to pivotal scenes.

Continue reading: High Anxiety Review

Silent Movie Review


Good
Mel Brooks has never exactly been a master of subtlety. He's also never known when a joke is worthy of a five-minute bit and when it's something you can flesh out into a full length feature.

Silent Movie is exactly what it says in the title: An honest to God silent film. In fact, it's a silent film about the making of a silent film. Brooks plays, basically, himself, a movie producer who's trying to get funding for the first silent film in 40 years. The studio is on the verge of bankruptcy, and our hero attempts to save the studio by rustling up Hollywood's biggest stars to appear in the show. They play themselves and, indeed, represent some of Hollywood's biggest stars.

Continue reading: Silent Movie Review

Silent Movie Review


Good
Mel Brooks has never exactly been a master of subtlety. He's also never known when a joke is worthy of a five-minute bit and when it's something you can flesh out into a full length feature.

Silent Movie is exactly what it says in the title: An honest to God silent film. In fact, it's a silent film about the making of a silent film. Brooks plays, basically, himself, a movie producer who's trying to get funding for the first silent film in 40 years. The studio is on the verge of bankruptcy, and our hero attempts to save the studio by rustling up Hollywood's biggest stars to appear in the show. They play themselves and, indeed, represent some of Hollywood's biggest stars.

Continue reading: Silent Movie Review

Robin Hood: Men In Tights Review


Good
Mediocre parody movies are Newton's second law as applied to cinema. For every hit over-the-top drama that paints characters by numbers there's at least one end to end parody that makes the cookie cutters look like Central Park caricatures.

So for Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, we have Robin Hood: Men in Tights. Kevin Costner's Hood is aped by Cary Elwes, Morgan Freeman's Azeem has turned in Dave Chappelle's Ahchoo. And Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio's ice queen Maid Marion is replaced with Amy Yasbeck's mild, cute, and chaste dolt.

Continue reading: Robin Hood: Men In Tights Review

The Producers (1968) Review


Extraordinary
Mel Brooks' directorial debut occurred in 1968. It was his gift to the world. And, you might ask, what was his gift originally titled? Springtime for Hitler. Springtime for Hitler, re-titled The Producers (probably for reasons of political correctness, which the film appears not to give a damn about), was a movie about two theatre producers who take it upon themselves to make a fortune off of a flop.

This unlikely scam features the seduction of old ladies for financing, the purchasing of a script titled: "Springtime for Hitler: A Musical Romp with Adolf and Eva", the hiring of the worst director and actor possible, and, of course, setting it all to music.

Continue reading: The Producers (1968) Review

Young Frankenstein Review


Essential
Mel Brooks was just about at the top of his game back in 1974, when he directed both Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein. Young Frankenstein tells the tale of an heir (Gene Wilder) of the original Frank, who inherits his creepy castle (shot in the original castle from the first Frankenstein movie) and starts work anew on his ancestor's experiments. Of course, this is courtesy of Mel Brooks, and it's perfectly parodied -- probably the best horror spoof ever made and a far cry ahead of Brooks' later Dracula: Dead and Loving It gag. Wilder and Peter Boyle (as the monster) are hysterical, but it's Teri Garr who steals the show as Frankenstein's buxom and considerably vapid assistant. The special edition DVD is especially recommended -- with a handful of outtakes and deleted scenes (though none are nearly as funny as what made the final cut).

Blazing Saddles Review


Excellent
Blazing Saddles isn't the funniest Mel Brooks movie (that'd be The Producers), but it's by far the least politically correct. Oddly, by venturing into new realms of racist humor, Brooks finds comedy gold, because he's mocking a genre (the western) that's chock full of racist content. And Brooks realizes, as do we during the screening of this film, that history has been willing to look the other way if John Wayne is the racist, so why can't a Jew do the same thing?

Saddles starts out both funny and inappropriate from frame one, with Burton Gilliam's chastisement of an Asian railroad worker who's passed out on the construction line: "Dock that chink a day's pay for nappin' on the job!" And that railroad actually has something to do with the movie: Evil governor (Mel Brooks) and his cornies (led by Harvey Korman) want to build a railroad to get rich. There's a town in the way, though, and they residents won't sell, so Lamarr appoints a black sheriff (Cleavon Little) to convince the redneck residents to leave voluntarily.

Continue reading: Blazing Saddles Review

The Muppet Movie Review


Excellent
Like most movies of its year, The Muppet Movie looks (and is) really dated. But it's worth it to willingly suspend disbelief at how dated it is --- to appreciate the good-natured humor and comedic flair of Jim Henson. Henson tried to entertain both kids and adults, and though both audiences were probably easier to please in the days before all comedy became irony-soaked, Henson was one of the first to add sly postmodern touches. And while the movie promotes the annoying myth of Hollywood as the dream factory, magic store, etc. it more than makes up for it by borrowing comedians from several generations, from then-new comics like Steve Martin and Elliott Gould to veterans like Bob Hope and Orson Welles(!), for an endless string of cameo appearances.

The plot loosely follows the odyssey of Kermit the Frog from his swamp home to Hollywood in search of celebrity. The desirability of fame and stardom is never questioned. The Hollywood worship becomes pretty maudlin at the end, thanks mainly to songwriter Paul Williams, whose songs are palatable at first ("Rainbow Connection" was a hit) but become too much before the end of the movie.

Continue reading: The Muppet Movie Review

Spaceballs Review


Excellent
True story: Before I turned 18, I had seen Spaceballs far more times than I had seen Star Wars. Since then, innate geekiness caught up with me and Star Wars eclipsed it. But when I was ten, my loyalties were with the Mel Brooks parody; the Schwartz was with me.

I don't doubt this is the case for many fans of the best Brooks films--how many kids of the seventies saw Blazing Saddles before laying eyes on a real western, or Young Frankenstein before the bride of same? I point this out to place Spaceballs with those other, more acknowledged Brooks classics.

Continue reading: Spaceballs Review

Dracula: Dead And Loving It Review


Bad
After the vastly disappointing Robin Hood: Men in Tights, Mel Brooks really needed to prove himself by getting back to his Young Frankenstein and Blazing Saddles-type comedy. The Dracula legend seemed like the perfect way to do it, especially considering how perfectly Brooks skewered ol' Frank. But sadly, Brooks manages to hack it up like he did to poor Robin Hood, thanks to some very stale jokes and overly repetitious gags.

Brooks basically takes Bram Stoker's Dracula (Francis Ford Coppola's film) and gives it the once-over, recreating the plot and characters almost directly from that movie, and giving them supposedly funny lines. The problem is that Bram Stoker's Dracula was pretty silly to begin with, and Brooks' version comes off as poking fun at a film that was already doing a good job of it all by itself.

Continue reading: Dracula: Dead And Loving It Review

To Be Or Not To Be (1983) Review


Good
Over a decade after Mel Brooks envisioned a Nazi musical in The Producers, he got his chance to make one for real, in the remake of Ernst Lubitsch's 1942 film To Be or Not to Be. The movie itself is kind of a dud (Polish actor makes do during the Nazi invasion, impersonates the Germans to get out of trouble), but listen for the dirge theme, which was stolen e-x-a-c-t-l-y from the ominous tune periodically underlying Raiders of the Lost Ark. Listen for yourself!

The Producers Review


Extraordinary
Mel Brooks' directorial debut occurred in 1968. It was his gift to the world. And, you might ask, what was his gift originally titled? Springtime for Hitler. Springtime for Hitler, re-titled The Producers (probably for reasons of political correctness, which the film appears not to give a damn about), was a movie about two theatre producers who take it upon themselves to make a fortune off of a flop.

This unlikely scam features the seduction of old ladies for financing, the purchasing of a script titled: "Springtime for Hitler: A Musical Romp with Adolf and Eva", the hiring of the worst director and actor possible, and, of course, setting it all to music.

Continue reading: The Producers Review

High Anxiety Review


Good
Mel Brooks does the best of his second-tier works (outside the holy canon of The Producers, Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein) in this send-up of Hitchcock flicks. The story tries to ride closely to Spellbound and Vertigo, but ventures into virtually all of Hitch's major works, including the most notable scenes from Psycho, The Birds, and North by Northwest. Not an easy feat, but it's funny as often as it's not.

Robots Review


OK

With its expensive but largely characterless voice castand an off-the-shelf follow-your-dreams plot retooled for a world populatedby wacky sentient machines, the computer-animated "Robots" islucky to have spectacular production design and one or two curious mechanicalstars to hold the interest of anyone over age 10.

Created by Blue Sky Studios and director Chris Wedge --the gang behind 2002's "IceAge" -- the story concerns young robotRodney Copperbottom (voiced by Ewan McGregor), a small-town dreamer madefrom well-worn, hand-me-down parts maintained by his dishwasher dad. He'sa hopeful, wide-eyed inventor who travels to the mega-opolis Robot Cityhoping to sell some of his scrap-metal gadgets to Bigweld Industries, apparentlythe monopoly supplier of all things robotic in this world.

The company was once run by the altruistic and welcomingMr. Bigweld (Mel Brooks), who for no adequately explored reason has withdrawnfrom the company he loved and let it be taken over by a greedy, brushed-steelcorporate suit named Ratchet (Greg Kinnear). This villain has decided todiscontinue all replacement parts Bigweld has always made for the robotpopulation -- all part of a sinister plan to scrap and melt down any "outmodes"who can't afford full-body upgrades.

Continue reading: Robots Review

Mel Brooks

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Mel Brooks

Date of birth

28th June, 1926

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.65




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Mel Brooks Movies

Hotel Transylvania 2 Trailer

Hotel Transylvania 2 Trailer

Count Dracula seems to have really changed his ways, embracing humans and allowing them to...

Hotel Transylvania 2 - Teaser Trailer

Hotel Transylvania 2 - Teaser Trailer

Following on from the adventures in the Hotel Transylvania, in which Count Dracula (Adam Sandler)...

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Mr. Peabody & Sherman - Teaser Trailer Trailer

Mr. Peabody & Sherman - Teaser Trailer Trailer

Mr. Peabody is doubtlessly the most intelligent and most accomplished dog on the planet, and...

Blazing Saddles Movie Review

Blazing Saddles Movie Review

Blazing Saddles isn't the funniest Mel Brooks movie (that'd be The Producers), but it's by...

The Producers (2005) Movie Review

The Producers (2005) Movie Review

I'll confess up front that I never saw The Producers on stage. Not that I...

The Producers (2005) Movie Review

The Producers (2005) Movie Review

I'll confess up front that I never saw The Producers on stage. Not that I...

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