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Tributes Pour In For Gene Wilder Who Has Died Aged 83


Gene Wilder Mel Brooks Jim Carrey Steve Martin Sarah Silverman

Tributes have poured in for actor and writer Gene Wilder who has died aged 83. Wilder’s death was announced by his family on Monday, who revealed he had been secretly battling Alzheimer’s for three years. After news of his passing broke, friends, colleagues and fellow comedians paid tribute on social media, with many referencing his most famous role as Willy Wonka in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory.

Gene WilderGene Wilder (pictured with Mel Brooks) has died aged 83

Mel Brooks, who directed Wilder in comedies Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein, lead the tributes on Twitter, saying the actor and writer had ‘ blessed’ him with his friendship. “One of the truly great talents of our time,” Brooks wrote. “He blessed every film we did with his magic & he blessed me with his friendship.”

Continue reading: Tributes Pour In For Gene Wilder Who Has Died Aged 83

Mel Brooks - Mel Brooks leaves lunch with a few gifts from a fan - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 27th June 2014

Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Pioneer And Legend In Comedy Sid Caesar Saluted By Friends And Colleagues


Carl Reiner Mel Brooks

Wednesday saw another tragedy in showbiz, with the death of comedian and TV pioneer Sid Caesar. He was 91. In the early years of his career, was the star and creator of Your Show of Shows, which practically introduced the variety show format in the 1950s. The show went on to launch some of the century’s most popular entertainers – Mel Brooks, Woody Allen and Carl Reiner all had their beginnings on Your Show of Shows.

Continue reading: Pioneer And Legend In Comedy Sid Caesar Saluted By Friends And Colleagues

Mr. Peabody In A Brand New Adventure For 2013, Cartoon To Big Screen [Trailer + Pictures]


Ty Burrell Ariel Winter Stanley Tucci Mel Brooks

It’s not easy being the world's smartest and most brilliant dog. In fact, it’s pretty darn difficult. Mr. Peabody is taking his endless adventure pallet onto the big screen, with a time-travelling yarn through ancient Greece and Egypt.

Mr PeabodyMr Peabody urged Sherman not to use the WABAC

Ol’ Peabody would probably just be sitting around playing scrabble with young Sherman now, if the scamp didn’t have designs on impressing the equally yong but more mischievous Penny Peabody.

Continue reading: Mr. Peabody In A Brand New Adventure For 2013, Cartoon To Big Screen [Trailer + Pictures]

Comic Mel Brooks Honored With Lifetime Achievement Award From American Film Institute


Mel Brooks Jimmy Kimmel

Mel Brooks became the 41st recipient of the American Film Institute's Lifetime Achievement Award at Thursday (June 6) night's handing-out ceremony. Upon receiving award the director of such comic greats as Young Frankenstein and Blazing Sandler told the star-studded audience that "movies saved [his] life," following a heartfelt yet humorous video tribute.

The ceremony before the the handing over of the award to the 86-year-old was a fitting one for the comedy great, beginning with a song and dance routine featuring numbers from Brooks' The Producers, all being reenacted by Martin Short. He said after; "the word genius is used a lot in Hollywood, so I might as well call Mel one," as the ceremony went on and a range of comedy greats gave their respects to the comic, with Larry David blaming Mel for keeping him away from comedy in his aspiring years because he knew he'd never live up to it, whilst Jimmy Kimmel took paying his respects to the writer/director a little more seriously, jokingly saying, We are going to miss you so much, Mel."

Kimmel continued; "you were one of the greats. Rest in peace, my friend," with Brooks addressing Kimmel's comment as soon as he got on stage , first swearing then exclaiming "I'm not gonna die!"

Continue reading: Comic Mel Brooks Honored With Lifetime Achievement Award From American Film Institute

Cindy Horn, Alan Horn and Cassidy Horn - Celebrities attend the 41st AFI Life Achievement Award honoring Mel Brooks at Dolby Theatre. - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Friday 7th June 2013

Mel Brooks, Cindy Horn, Alan Horn and Cassidy Horn
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Billy Crystal and Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner and Robert Trachtenberg - Premiere of American Masters 'Mel Brooks: Make A Noise' at the Paley Center for Media - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 9th May 2013

Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner and Robert Trachtenberg
Mel Brooks and Robert Trachtenberg
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks and Robert Trachtenberg
Mel Brooks and Robert Trachtenberg
Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner and Robert Trachtenberg

Video - Mel Brooks Plays Ping Pong With Dick Cavett


Veteran actor and producer Mel Brooks (Blazing Saddles; Young Frankenstein; The Producers) leaves Porta Via restaurant after having lunch with friends. After responding to a photographer, Mel finishes talking about his new HBO show, 'Mel Brooks and Dick Cavett Together Again' where, he says, he and Cavett will be playing ping pong. He jokes about going over to a rich friend's house in order to see it.

Mel Brooks' glittering career has seen him earn a Grammy Award, an Emmy Award, a Tony Award and an Oscar, making him one of only thirteen entertainers - including Audrey Hepburn and Whoopi Goldberg - to have done so

Mel Brooks Friday 9th September 2011 has lunch in Beverly Hills Los Angeles, California

Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
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Mel Brooks Friday 14th January 2011 having lunch with friends in Beverly Hills Los Angeles, California, USA

Mel Brooks
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Mel Brooks Friday 24th September 2010 having lunch with a friend in Beverly Hills. Los Angeles, California

Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks and Cloris Leachman - Mel Brooks, Cloris Leachman Hollywood, California - Opening Night of 'Young Frankenstein' at the Pantages Theatre Tuesday 27th July 2010

Mel Brooks and Cloris Leachman
Mel Brooks
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Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks Friday 2nd July 2010 has lunch in Beverly Hills with friends Los Angeles, California

Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks, Son Max and grandson Henry - Mel Brooks, Son Max and grandson Henry Thursday 6th May 2010 at Egyptian Theater Los Angeles, California

Mel Brooks, Son Max and Grandson Henry
Mel Brooks, Son Max and Grandson Henry
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks and Eddie Brooks - Eddie Brooks and Mel Brooks Los Angeles, California - Mel Brooks is honoured with the 2406th star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame Friday 23rd April 2010

Mel Brooks and Eddie Brooks
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Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Blazing Saddles Review


Excellent
Blazing Saddles isn't the funniest Mel Brooks movie (that'd be The Producers), but it's by far the least politically correct. Oddly, by venturing into new realms of racist humor, Brooks finds comedy gold, because he's mocking a genre (the western) that's chock full of racist content. And Brooks realizes, as do we during the screening of this film, that history has been willing to look the other way if John Wayne is the racist, so why can't a Jew do the same thing?

Saddles starts out both funny and inappropriate from frame one, with Burton Gilliam's chastisement of an Asian railroad worker who's passed out on the construction line: "Dock that chink a day's pay for nappin' on the job!" And that railroad actually has something to do with the movie: Evil governor (Mel Brooks) and his cornies (led by Harvey Korman) want to build a railroad to get rich. There's a town in the way, though, and they residents won't sell, so Lamarr appoints a black sheriff (Cleavon Little) to convince the redneck residents to leave voluntarily.

Continue reading: Blazing Saddles Review

Young Frankenstein Review


Essential
Mel Brooks was just about at the top of his game back in 1974, when he directed both Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein. Young Frankenstein tells the tale of an heir (Gene Wilder) of the original Frank, who inherits his creepy castle (shot in the original castle from the first Frankenstein movie) and starts work anew on his ancestor's experiments. Of course, this is courtesy of Mel Brooks, and it's perfectly parodied -- probably the best horror spoof ever made and a far cry ahead of Brooks' later Dracula: Dead and Loving It gag. Wilder and Peter Boyle (as the monster) are hysterical, but it's Teri Garr who steals the show as Frankenstein's buxom and considerably vapid assistant. The special edition DVD is especially recommended -- with a handful of outtakes and deleted scenes (though none are nearly as funny as what made the final cut).

The Producers (2005) Review


OK
I'll confess up front that I never saw The Producers on stage. Not that I didn't want to: I'm a huge fan of the original Mel Brooks film -- a movie I consider, bar none, his best work and one of the 10 greatest comedies ever made. (I even wanted to name my firstborn after Zero Mostel, but that's another story.) The Broadway show also earned critical praise the likes of which few stage productions have seen: 12 Tony Awards and a waiting list for tickets that spanned over a year.

In 1968, Brooks was at the top of his game. He was also at the very beginning of it: The Producers was his first feature film, and you can track the quality of his movies on a steady decline which stretches from the awesome Blazing Saddles (1974) to the middling Spaceballs (1987) to the awful Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995), Brooks' last appearance behind the camera.

Continue reading: The Producers (2005) Review

To Be Or Not To Be (1983) Review


Good
Over a decade after Mel Brooks envisioned a Nazi musical in The Producers, he got his chance to make one for real, in the remake of Ernst Lubitsch's 1942 film To Be or Not to Be. The movie itself is kind of a dud (Polish actor makes do during the Nazi invasion, impersonates the Germans to get out of trouble), but listen for the dirge theme, which was stolen e-x-a-c-t-l-y from the ominous tune periodically underlying Raiders of the Lost Ark. Listen for yourself!

High Anxiety Review


Very Good
One of the reasons we film critics have a soft spot for Mel Brooks's High Anxiety is that its endless parade of campy Hitchcock gags makes us feel smart. "Oh, that's from Vertigo. Hey, that's from North by Northwest. Did you hear that? He just said MacGuffin."

Of course, it's vitally important that you be in the mood to see a Mel Brooks movie when you see a Mel Brooks movie -- any Mel Brooks movie -- because if you're not, you'll just groan, roll your eyes, and walk away. But if you're feeling silly, Mel will make you laugh, and High Anxiety keeps the zingers coming from the very first moment, when the urgent strains of the powerful orchestra accompany Dr. Richard Thorndyke (Brooks) as he walks through the airport during the opening credits. The credits end, and Thorndyke comments, "What a dramatic airport!" Later, the Los Angeles Symphony Orchestra will follow him around in a bus to add more drama to pivotal scenes.

Continue reading: High Anxiety Review

Silent Movie Review


Good
Mel Brooks has never exactly been a master of subtlety. He's also never known when a joke is worthy of a five-minute bit and when it's something you can flesh out into a full length feature.

Silent Movie is exactly what it says in the title: An honest to God silent film. In fact, it's a silent film about the making of a silent film. Brooks plays, basically, himself, a movie producer who's trying to get funding for the first silent film in 40 years. The studio is on the verge of bankruptcy, and our hero attempts to save the studio by rustling up Hollywood's biggest stars to appear in the show. They play themselves and, indeed, represent some of Hollywood's biggest stars.

Continue reading: Silent Movie Review

Silent Movie Review


Good
Mel Brooks has never exactly been a master of subtlety. He's also never known when a joke is worthy of a five-minute bit and when it's something you can flesh out into a full length feature.

Silent Movie is exactly what it says in the title: An honest to God silent film. In fact, it's a silent film about the making of a silent film. Brooks plays, basically, himself, a movie producer who's trying to get funding for the first silent film in 40 years. The studio is on the verge of bankruptcy, and our hero attempts to save the studio by rustling up Hollywood's biggest stars to appear in the show. They play themselves and, indeed, represent some of Hollywood's biggest stars.

Continue reading: Silent Movie Review

Robin Hood: Men In Tights Review


Good
Mediocre parody movies are Newton's second law as applied to cinema. For every hit over-the-top drama that paints characters by numbers there's at least one end to end parody that makes the cookie cutters look like Central Park caricatures.

So for Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, we have Robin Hood: Men in Tights. Kevin Costner's Hood is aped by Cary Elwes, Morgan Freeman's Azeem has turned in Dave Chappelle's Ahchoo. And Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio's ice queen Maid Marion is replaced with Amy Yasbeck's mild, cute, and chaste dolt.

Continue reading: Robin Hood: Men In Tights Review

The Producers (1968) Review


Extraordinary
Mel Brooks' directorial debut occurred in 1968. It was his gift to the world. And, you might ask, what was his gift originally titled? Springtime for Hitler. Springtime for Hitler, re-titled The Producers (probably for reasons of political correctness, which the film appears not to give a damn about), was a movie about two theatre producers who take it upon themselves to make a fortune off of a flop.

This unlikely scam features the seduction of old ladies for financing, the purchasing of a script titled: "Springtime for Hitler: A Musical Romp with Adolf and Eva", the hiring of the worst director and actor possible, and, of course, setting it all to music.

Continue reading: The Producers (1968) Review

Young Frankenstein Review


Essential
Mel Brooks was just about at the top of his game back in 1974, when he directed both Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein. Young Frankenstein tells the tale of an heir (Gene Wilder) of the original Frank, who inherits his creepy castle (shot in the original castle from the first Frankenstein movie) and starts work anew on his ancestor's experiments. Of course, this is courtesy of Mel Brooks, and it's perfectly parodied -- probably the best horror spoof ever made and a far cry ahead of Brooks' later Dracula: Dead and Loving It gag. Wilder and Peter Boyle (as the monster) are hysterical, but it's Teri Garr who steals the show as Frankenstein's buxom and considerably vapid assistant. The special edition DVD is especially recommended -- with a handful of outtakes and deleted scenes (though none are nearly as funny as what made the final cut).

Robots Review


Extraordinary
The 1995 release of Pixar's Toy Story forever altered the world of animated cinema. In an instant, decades of Disney-dominated traditional cartoons vanished in a pixilated puff of fairy dust and a new era of almost entirely computer-generated animation began. The ensuing wave of digital films has met with such astonishing box-office success that even such forgettable romps as Chris Wedge's Ice Age have managed to top the earnings charts in their opening weeks.

But things are changing in the animation scene. The freshness of CG has worn away, and audiences are no longer wowed by flashy technology alone. Disney/Pixar's The Incredibles has raised the bar on both animation excellence and story-telling savvy to a level that will be hard to top in coming years. If such early hits as Toy Story or Antz premiered today, it's unlikely they would wow the crowds nearly as much as they did on their initial releases. It's a tough time to be an animated film.

Continue reading: Robots Review

Blazing Saddles Review


Excellent
Blazing Saddles isn't the funniest Mel Brooks movie (that'd be The Producers), but it's by far the least politically correct. Oddly, by venturing into new realms of racist humor, Brooks finds comedy gold, because he's mocking a genre (the western) that's chock full of racist content. And Brooks realizes, as do we during the screening of this film, that history has been willing to look the other way if John Wayne is the racist, so why can't a Jew do the same thing?

Saddles starts out both funny and inappropriate from frame one, with Burton Gilliam's chastisement of an Asian railroad worker who's passed out on the construction line: "Dock that chink a day's pay for nappin' on the job!" And that railroad actually has something to do with the movie: Evil governor (Mel Brooks) and his cornies (led by Harvey Korman) want to build a railroad to get rich. There's a town in the way, though, and they residents won't sell, so Lamarr appoints a black sheriff (Cleavon Little) to convince the redneck residents to leave voluntarily.

Continue reading: Blazing Saddles Review

The Muppet Movie Review


Excellent
Like most movies of its year, The Muppet Movie looks (and is) really dated. But it's worth it to willingly suspend disbelief at how dated it is --- to appreciate the good-natured humor and comedic flair of Jim Henson. Henson tried to entertain both kids and adults, and though both audiences were probably easier to please in the days before all comedy became irony-soaked, Henson was one of the first to add sly postmodern touches. And while the movie promotes the annoying myth of Hollywood as the dream factory, magic store, etc. it more than makes up for it by borrowing comedians from several generations, from then-new comics like Steve Martin and Elliott Gould to veterans like Bob Hope and Orson Welles(!), for an endless string of cameo appearances.

The plot loosely follows the odyssey of Kermit the Frog from his swamp home to Hollywood in search of celebrity. The desirability of fame and stardom is never questioned. The Hollywood worship becomes pretty maudlin at the end, thanks mainly to songwriter Paul Williams, whose songs are palatable at first ("Rainbow Connection" was a hit) but become too much before the end of the movie.

Continue reading: The Muppet Movie Review

Spaceballs Review


Excellent
True story: Before I turned 18, I had seen Spaceballs far more times than I had seen Star Wars. Since then, innate geekiness caught up with me and Star Wars eclipsed it. But when I was ten, my loyalties were with the Mel Brooks parody; the Schwartz was with me.

I don't doubt this is the case for many fans of the best Brooks films--how many kids of the seventies saw Blazing Saddles before laying eyes on a real western, or Young Frankenstein before the bride of same? I point this out to place Spaceballs with those other, more acknowledged Brooks classics.

Continue reading: Spaceballs Review

Dracula: Dead And Loving It Review


Bad
After the vastly disappointing Robin Hood: Men in Tights, Mel Brooks really needed to prove himself by getting back to his Young Frankenstein and Blazing Saddles-type comedy. The Dracula legend seemed like the perfect way to do it, especially considering how perfectly Brooks skewered ol' Frank. But sadly, Brooks manages to hack it up like he did to poor Robin Hood, thanks to some very stale jokes and overly repetitious gags.

Brooks basically takes Bram Stoker's Dracula (Francis Ford Coppola's film) and gives it the once-over, recreating the plot and characters almost directly from that movie, and giving them supposedly funny lines. The problem is that Bram Stoker's Dracula was pretty silly to begin with, and Brooks' version comes off as poking fun at a film that was already doing a good job of it all by itself.

Continue reading: Dracula: Dead And Loving It Review

Mel Brooks

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Mel Brooks

Date of birth

28th June, 1926

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.65




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Mel Brooks Movies

Hotel Transylvania 2 Trailer

Hotel Transylvania 2 Trailer

Count Dracula seems to have really changed his ways, embracing humans and allowing them to...

Hotel Transylvania 2 - Teaser Trailer

Hotel Transylvania 2 - Teaser Trailer

Following on from the adventures in the Hotel Transylvania, in which Count Dracula (Adam Sandler)...

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Mr. Peabody & Sherman - Teaser Trailer Trailer

Mr. Peabody & Sherman - Teaser Trailer Trailer

Mr. Peabody is doubtlessly the most intelligent and most accomplished dog on the planet, and...

Blazing Saddles Movie Review

Blazing Saddles Movie Review

Blazing Saddles isn't the funniest Mel Brooks movie (that'd be The Producers), but it's by...

The Producers (2005) Movie Review

The Producers (2005) Movie Review

I'll confess up front that I never saw The Producers on stage. Not that I...

The Producers (2005) Movie Review

The Producers (2005) Movie Review

I'll confess up front that I never saw The Producers on stage. Not that I...

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