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'Infinitely Polar Bear' - After Party

Maya Forbes and Imogene Wolodarsky - Sony Pictures Classics Official After Party For "Infinitely Polar Bear" Sponsored By "APEX, The One, Blue Moon And Maestro Dobel Tequila" at APEX - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 15th June 2015

Maya Forbes and Imogene Wolodarsky
Maya Forbes
Maya Forbes
Maya Forbes
Maya Forbes

Infinitely Polar Bear Trailer


Love and family can be a difficult thing to manage. For Cam Stuart (Mark Ruffalo), it's especially hard, as he suffers from Bipolar disorder. His wife, Maggie (Zoe Saldana) is moving to New York to pursue her career, and the two work out a deal. Cam can't face the idea of living without his children, but also can't move with her, so he chooses to look after the children by himself.

What follows is the redemptive story, of how a man can face his demons, and prove himself to the people he loves the most. Written and directed by Maya Forbes in her directorial debut, 'Infinity Polar Bear' serves as the semi-biographical story of Forbes. The film went into principle photography on 9th April 2013 in Providence, Rhode Island, with J. J. Abrams and Bryan Burk serving as executive producers.

The film saw it's premiere at Sundance Film Festival on 18th January 2014, before opening at the Toronto International Film Festival on 10th September the same year. Following an appearance at the Los Angeles Film Festival on 14th June 2015, the film is set to be released in the US on 19th June 2015.

Varietys Creative Impact Awards And 10 Directors to Watch Brunch

Maya Forbes - Variety's Creative Impact Awards And 10 Directors to Watch Brunch, at the Parker Palm Springs as part of the Palm Springs International Film Festival - Palm Springs, California, United States - Sunday 5th January 2014

Maya Forbes

Monsters vs. Aliens Review


Weak
It's a title that promises much more than it could ever truly deliver. It plays on B-movie fans' wildest dreams but offers them something much less successful. It comes from Dreamworks, which means it will either be completely faithful to its unusual source material (a la Kung Fu Panda's homage to the films of Asian martial arts experts the Shaw brothers) or rely on the tired, post-Shrek formula of animation artistry meshed with tired pop culture quips. So what, exactly, does the latest CG spectacle Monsters vs. Aliens truly have to offer? Sadly, it's a little bit of moviemaking magic surrounded by loads and loads of scripted stupidity.

While planning for her wedding to local newsman Derek Dietl (voice of Paul Rudd), Susan Murphy (Reese Witherspoon) is hit by an enormous meteorite containing a mysterious alien element. It instantly causes her to grow in size to gigantic proportions. Naturally, this leads the government, under the director of General W. R. Monger (Kiefer Sutherland) to capture the gal and take her back to his top secret compound. There, he keeps other so-called "monsters" -- mad scientist turned bug Dr. Cockroach (Hugh Laurie), an aquatic fish man known as the Missing Link (Will Arnett), a blob like biological accident named B.O.B. (Seth Rogen), and Insectosaurus, a building-sized pest with an ear-shattering scream. As America's first line of defense against trouble, the team is put to the test when extraterrestrial tyrant Gallaxhar (Rainn Wilson) arrives, ready to take over Earth.

Continue reading: Monsters vs. Aliens Review

The Rocker Review


Terrible
To be frank, Peter Cattaneo's The Rocker has about as much to do with rock and roll as a baby hippopotamus has to do with the Battle of Verdun.

Rainn Wilson, the talented comedian and actor made celebrity by the role of Dwight Schrute on NBC's The Office, plays Robert Fishman, Fish to his friends. Back when leopard-print stockings on men seemed like a stroke of genius, Fish is the drummer for burgeoning hair metal outfit Vesuvius. When the band is offered a contract with Matchbook Records, they find that the only catch to the deal is that the label wants the son of one of its bigwigs to take Fish's place. Fish is out.

Continue reading: The Rocker Review

The Larry Sanders Show: Not Just the Best of... Review


Extraordinary
It's a cliche now to complain that HBO has the best original programming on television, but never has that been more true than in the case of The Larry Sanders Show, which ran for six seasons from 1992 to 1998 and was nominated for (and won) countless Emmys and every other award under the sun.

The show is pure genius and pure simplicity: Larry Sanders (Garry Shandling) is a late night talk show host on an unspecified network in the post-Carson era. Each week we were treated to the behind-the-scenes antics that go on before such a show can get on the air five nights a week: At its slapstick simplest we have Carol Burnett fleeing spiders by climbing on Larry's back. At its smarmy sickest, we have Larry's agent (Bob Odenkirk) selling him down the river so he can move on to greener pastures: Namely one Jon Stewart, a guest host for the show who became a running theme in later years as a cheap, network-approved replacement for the skewing-too-old Larry.

Continue reading: The Larry Sanders Show: Not Just the Best of... Review

Seeing Other People Review


Weak
Wallace Wolodarsky's Seeing Other People is a comedy that's supposed to be about how sexual temptation can really screw up a relationship, but it's more illustrative of how a relationship can really screw up a comedy.

Ed (Jay Mohr) and Alice (Julianne Nicholson) are an engaged couple on the brink of a rut. Alice, who is relatively inexperienced sexually, suggests that before they get married they should both be allowed to engage in casual sex for an undetermined period of time. Ed is initially skeptical, but agrees after much prodding. The couple then embarks on a series of sexual misadventures; Alice takes up with Donald (Matthew Davis), a needy hunk of a landscaper, and Ed finds himself with Sandy (Jill Ritchie), college-aged girl. But the film's actual, inexplicable focus is the endless bickering between Ed and Alice, whose feelings about this arrangement flip-flop about once every two or three minutes, expressed through an endlessly flowing river of unfunny dialogue.

Continue reading: Seeing Other People Review

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