Maud Adams

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Maud Adams Arrivals Everything or Nothing:The Untold Story of 007 held at the Muesum of Modern Art Wednesday 3rd October 2012

Maud Adams
Carey Lowell and Maud Adams
Maud Adams
Maud Adams
Maud Adams
Maud Adams

Maud Adams Saturday 18th July 2009 at the Hollywood Collector's Show Burbank, California

Maud Adams

Maud Adams - Sunday 21st October 2007 at Beverly Hilton Hotel Beverly Hills, California

Maud Adams
Maud Adams
Maud Adams
Maud Adams
Maud Adams

Octopussy Review


Weak
Hardly Mr. Bond's finest hour. This oddball adventure (apparently a conflagration of two different Bond novels) has poor Roger Moore dressed as a clown in a gypsy circus, attempting to outsmart an enemy by (gasp) outbidding him at an auction, and, in its worst moment, stumbling through a Halloween-decoration cobweb as he's attacked by a spider in the Indian jungle. Despite some fun moments (the villain's henchman has an awesome yo-yo made out of a circular saw blade), Octopussy isn't just embarassing to say out loud, it's also a nearly outright-dud for the Bond franchise. The plot unravels when we discover that it's all a ruse to start World War III (courtesy of a rogue Russian general), and Maud Adams, who doesn't appear until more than halfway through the film and has very few scenes, doesn't really work as the titular bond girl (this is actually her second Bond appearance). For completists only.

Continue reading: Octopussy Review

The Man With The Golden Gun Review


Very Good
Christopher Lee always makes for an exceptional video. It's just too bad that it had to be in The Man with the Golden Gun, which ranks as one of James Bond's more absurd outings, involving a maniacal genius (Lee) who's assassinating folks and has Bond next on his list. Bond thus goes after this Scaramanga and uncovers the usual mega-weapon plot, this time featuring... wait for it... solar power. The theme song by Lulu (sample lyrics: "Love is required/Whenever he's hired/He comes just before the kiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiill") is original and a great example of high camp, much like the rest of the film. It's all gaudily good, right down to Hervé Villechaize(!), bikini-clad Britt Ekland, and the inimitable Clifton James as the vacationing Sheriff J.W. Pepper (introduced in Live and Let Die), who tags along for a bit.

Continue reading: The Man With The Golden Gun Review

Rollerball (1975) Review


Good
Norman Jewison had a bomb in 1975 with Rollerball, a futuristic tale (set in 2018) in an era when war, poverty, nationality, and even individuality have been snuffed out. To appease the masses, a sport called rollerball has been devised -- a more brutal roller derby with motorcycles thrown in for good mix.

It's hardly 1984, but Jewison's dystopia has its moments, namely when rollerball champ Jonathan E. (James Caan) is skating around the course, thrashing his opponents into ground beef. When he squares off against evil corporate honcho Bartholomew (John Houseman, unforgettably uncomfortable in "the future"), the scenes are priceless.

Continue reading: Rollerball (1975) Review

The Man With The Golden Gun Review


Very Good
Christopher Lee always makes for an exceptional video. It's just too bad that it had to be in The Man with the Golden Gun, which ranks as one of James Bond's more absurd outings, involving a maniacal genius (Lee) who's assassinating folks and has Bond next on his list. Bond thus goes after this Scaramanga and uncovers the usual mega-weapon plot, this time featuring... wait for it... solar power. The theme song by Lulu (sample lyrics: "Love is required/Whenever he's hired/He comes just before the kiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiill") is original and a great example of high camp, much like the rest of the film. It's all gaudily good, right down to Hervé Villechaize(!), bikini-clad Britt Ekland, and the inimitable Clifton James as the vacationing Sheriff J.W. Pepper, who tags along for a bit.

Rollerball (1975) Review


Good
Norman Jewison had a bomb in 1975 with Rollerball, a futuristic tale (set in 2018) in an era when war, poverty, nationality, and even individuality have been snuffed out. To appease the masses, a sport called rollerball has been devised -- a more brutal roller derby with motorcycles thrown in for good mix.

It's hardly 1984, but Jewison's dystopia has its moments, namely when rollerball champ Jonathan E. (James Caan) is skating around the course, thrashing his opponents into ground beef. When he squares off against evil corporate honcho Bartholomew (John Houseman, unforgettably uncomfortable in "the future"), the scenes are priceless.

Continue reading: Rollerball (1975) Review

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