Matthew Marsden

Matthew Marsden

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US Ireland Alliance To Honor Stephen Colbert, Carrie Fisher And Irish Artist Colin Davidson

Nadine Marsden and Matthew Marsden - US Ireland Alliance to Honor Stephen Colbert, Carrie Fisher and Irish Artist Colin Davidson at Pre Academy Awards Event at Bad Robot Santa Monica, Academy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 19th February 2015

Nadine Marsden and Matthew Marsden

Bounty Killer Review


Good

Like a spoof mash-up of Mad Max and Machete, this nutty action movie throws us into a Wild West dystopia with enough wit and energy to overcome its clunky production values. A whiff of serious subtext helps too. Although it's essentially just a riotous B-movie thrill ride without much of a plot.

The story takes place in the near future, after the Corporate Wars destroyed the world. Now the former company executives are under death warrants, chased by superstar bounty killers through the desolate landscape. One of the most notorious killers is Drifter (Marsden), who has a bounty on his head after sniffing too close to a major scandal. As he heads to the Council to clear his name, he and his new gun caddy Jack (Hardley) are chased by the glamourous killer Mary Death (Pitre). And all of them are being pursued by the relentless Van Sterling (Busey), whose shady boss (Loken) is working on some sort of nefarious plan.

The film's luridly colourful design echoes its graphic-novel origins, as do the comic-book animation segments. And the violence is relentlessly blood-spurting, keeping us laughing so we don't notice how cheesy the effects and action really are. Fortunately, everything is underscored with sardonic humour, rude jokes and melodramatic characters, each of whom has a torrid history. This allows for plenty of irrelevant innuendo, especially between the inexpressive Marsden and the striking Pitre.

Continue reading: Bounty Killer Review

UK Film Premiere Of 'Transformers: Revenge Of The Fallen' Held At The Odeon Leicester Square

Matthew Marsden and Odeon Leicester Square Monday 15th June 2009 UK film premiere of 'Transformers: Revenge Of The Fallen' held at the Odeon Leicester Square England

Matthew Marsden and Odeon Leicester Square
Matthew Marsden and Odeon Leicester Square
Matthew Marsden and Odeon Leicester Square

UK Film Premiere Of 'Rambo' - Arrivals

Matthew Marsden and Rambo Tuesday 12th February 2008 UK Film Premiere of 'Rambo' - Arrivals London, England

Matthew Marsden and Rambo
Matthew Marsden and Rambo
Matthew Marsden, Rambo and Sylvester Stallone
Matthew Marsden, Rambo and Sylvester Stallone
Matthew Marsden, Rambo and Sylvester Stallone

Rambo (2008) Review


Good
What do you do when Tinseltown no longer cares for your career, when your latest attempts at an artistic renaissance or cultural relevancy have failed miserably? Well, if you're one time box office king Sylvester Stallone, you cannibalize your past and hope that someone out there in film geek nation still cares. After 2006's Rocky Balboa proved that audiences could cotton to a self-referential return to former glory, a post-Planet Hollywood Stallone decided pissed off Vietnam Vet John Rambo was due for a comeback. Of course, the main question in everyone's mind was, after three previous installments of the mercenary and mayhem series, could the actor bring anything new to the show?

The answer is yes, and it's painted in glorious clots of deep, deep red. When a group of goody-two-shoes religious types get caught up in the middle of Burma's brutal civil war, a reluctant reverend (Ken Howard) seeks out soldier-turned-snake wrangler John Rambo for help. Seems he wants to send some paid "professionals" in to retrieve his flock, and since our hero guided the original tour into enemy territory, he's the best man to lead this latest incursion. Of course, when the hired help proves woefully egotistical, Rambo steps up to show them the proper way to kick bad guy butt. Besides, he has been "spiritually" touched by the sole female member, an idealist named Sarah (Julie Benz). He must then break into a heavily-guarded compound and save her and her friends before a corrupt local General throws them to his collection of flesh-eating pigs, among other inhuman tortures.

Continue reading: Rambo (2008) Review

Resident Evil: Extinction World Premiere At Planet Hollywood Hotel And Casino

Matthew Marsden and Las Vegas - Thursday 20th September 2007 at Planet Hollywood Las Vegas, Nevada

Matthew Marsden and Las Vegas
Matthew Marsden and Las Vegas
Matthew Marsden and Las Vegas

World Premiere Of 'Resident Evil: Extinction' At Planet Hollywood Hotel & Casino - Arrivals

Matthew Marsden and Las Vegas - Thursday 20th September 2007 at Planet Hollywood Las Vegas, USA

Matthew Marsden and Las Vegas
Las Vegas and Matthew Marsden
Matthew Marsden and Las Vegas

Doa: Dead Or Alive Review


Weak
Dead or Alive could be the most literal cinematic interpretation of a computer game ever made. In the film, three young women fight in a combat tournament called DOA: Dead or Alive, held on a top secret, technologically advanced Pacific island resort. As they kick, punch and scratch their way through a smorgasbord of fighters (and suitors), they are recorded by the island's invasive video cameras and watched on multiple screens in a computer laboratory by tournament director Donovan (Eric Roberts). Here's where it gets literal. Donovan injects all competitors with nanobots that record data from their blood stream. This data is relayed back into the computer system so that when Donovan (and the audience) views the fights, incongruous colored bars hover in the upper right and left corners of the screen, indicating the power levels of each competitor. Each time a player is hit, the bar reduces. As the bar is diminished, the fighter becomes more sluggish, until it disappears completely and the fighter collapses. When this happens, giant red and yellow words jump onto the screen and announce who won, who lost, and how.

Clearly, the filmmakers have respected the basic format of the DOA computer game and respected its fans. However, in respecting the computer game director Cory Yuen has disrespected cinema and forgotten the basic needs of a decent film: a good story, interesting characters and some sort of drama. DOA occasionally touches on all of these points, but kicks away in favor of a slavish desire to package the entire production in the style of its source material.

Continue reading: Doa: Dead Or Alive Review

Tamara Review


Terrible
For quite some time now, the horror genre has simply been seen as an easy jolt; a way to get your date to jump into your arms for consolation that will later pay-off at a run for second base. Furthermore, it's a reason to plug in formula more than any other genre, a fact exploited in Wes Craven's Scream films. The disease is rampant in the U.S., with few exceptions in the rest of the world. Social commentary in horror films (Land of the Dead, The Devil's Rejects) just doesn't sell as much as wimpy, by-the-numbers stuff (Saw II, House of Wax) these days.

Tamara raises the stakes: it throws in even more teen hormones than House of Wax. Tell me if this sounds familiar: an ugly duckling named Tamara (Jenna Dewan) is accidentally killed while being bullied about uncovering steroid usage at school. But death, of course, never keeps a good girl down. She returns as a cleavage-sprouting hottie with an axe to grind against the kids who put her in the ground, using her new-found power to make people do what she wants. She also makes time to try to get close to Mr. Notally (Matthew Marsden), the dreamy teacher who ignored her before her death. Don't get me started about how Tamara drives her dispatchers to self-mutilation and homosexual tendencies. Oh, and her father is a booze hound, in case you didn't know.

Continue reading: Tamara Review

Anacondas: The Hunt For The Blood Orchid Review


Weak
When I admitted to a friend that I yet to see the original Anaconda, he assured me that it was a hoot. After all, where else can you see Jon Voight eaten by a gigantic snake and then vomited back out? Well, aside from Coming Home?

If the sequel had one scene like that, then, I would have left the theater a happy camper. However, Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid does not. That is a big problem.

Continue reading: Anacondas: The Hunt For The Blood Orchid Review

Matthew Marsden

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Matthew Marsden Movies

Bounty Killer Movie Review

Bounty Killer Movie Review

Like a spoof mash-up of Mad Max and Machete, this nutty action movie throws us...

Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen Trailer

Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen Trailer

Watch the trailer for Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen.Revenge of the Fallen is the title...

Rambo Trailer

Rambo Trailer

RamboAlternate Trailer On February 22nd 2008, 20 years after the last instalment in the...

Rambo (2008) Movie Review

Rambo (2008) Movie Review

What do you do when Tinseltown no longer cares for your career, when your latest...

Rambo, Trailer Trailer

Rambo, Trailer Trailer

Rambo22 February 2008TrailerTwenty years after the last installment in the film series, John Rambo (SYLVESTER...

Doa: Dead Or Alive Movie Review

Doa: Dead Or Alive Movie Review

Dead or Alive could be the most literal cinematic interpretation of a computer game ever...

Tamara Movie Review

Tamara Movie Review

For quite some time now, the horror genre has simply been seen as an easy...

Anacondas: The Hunt For The Blood Orchid Movie Review

Anacondas: The Hunt For The Blood Orchid Movie Review

When I admitted to a friend that I yet to see the original Anaconda, he...

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