Matthew Gross

Matthew Gross

Matthew Gross Quick Links

Film RSS

Fired Up! Review


OK
Broad and very silly, this comedy just about keeps us chuckling even when things get stupid and predictable. It's not very well-written, but there are enough deranged characters to make it almost worth a look.

At Gerald Ford High School, two chucklehead jock pals--nice guy Shawn (D'Agosto) and blond hunk Nick (Olsen)--decide to skip a gruelling football practice and chase girls at cheerleader camp instead. Of course, they soon start to actually enjoy themselves, and Shawn begins to fall for one of his teammates (Roemer), but trouble is brewing as they prepare to face the archrival Panthers. Meanwhile, Nick tries to woo the seductive Diora (Sims), wife of the camp's gung-ho director (Higgins).

Continue reading: Fired Up! Review

Fired Up! Review


Terrible
From the advertisements, Fired Up! looks like the movie that finally indulges in what every young man fantasizes about: Crashing cheerleading camp to get laid. On the poster, the tagline reads: "Two guys. 300 girls. You do the math." With those numbers, lots of guys would look past those annoying cheers and be the first in line at the movie theater with their dates.

Unfortunately, Fired Up! isn't the movie it says it is. It's rated PG-13, and beyond a few shots of young ladies in cheer outfits, there's nothing remotely objectionable here. That would be fine if it were a family film. But it's being marketed as a sexy teen comedy.

Continue reading: Fired Up! Review

Across The Universe Review


Excellent
Julie Taymor's Across the Universe is a musical that tells its story through a couple dozen Beatles songs and in service of this ambition, it is necessary to forgive a certain degree of yearning nostalgia. The wealth of references and in-jokes -- spare lyrics turning up in dialogue, a rooftop concert, unexpected appearances of Joe Cocker -- may seem cornball or literal, and they sometimes are, but the movie's brand of Beatlemania is unabashedly fannish, too, and understandable in its way. There are plenty of musical acts whose music and lyrics brought to life would not enchant me; don't wake me for the inevitable Light My Fire or Brass in Pocket. But if Taymor and her collaborators can't contain their enthusiasm for referring to as many songs, characters, real-life incidents, and other elements involved in the storied history of the Beatles, I can't say I blame them. I may even giggle along in solidarity.

To wit: Jude (Jim Sturgess) washes ashore to seek out his absent father, and meets raffish Princeton student Maxwell (Joe Anderson). The fast friends wind up in New York's counterculture scene, along with Max's sister Lucy (Evan Rachel Wood), and with a gaggle of musicians, artists, and radicals, navigate the kind of historical sixties tumult often seen in textbooks and TV miniseries. Along the way they encounter psychedelic gurus played by celebrity guests, like Dr. Robert (Bono) and Mr. Kite (Eddie Izzard). This may start to sound like excess until you consider the restraint the screenwriters have shown in failing to include any characters named Michelle, Eleanor Rigby, Bungalow Bill, or Rocky Raccoon.

Continue reading: Across The Universe Review

Joe Somebody Review


Weak
The premise for Joe Somebody could fit on the back of a Cuban postcard. But here's the long version: Allen plays Joe Scheffer -- a poster boy for cubical bleakness -- who works as a video editor at a generic pharmaceutical company in Minnesota, who spends his days cutting together ridiculous ads for nameless health products. Joe's divorced, has an annoyingly clever pre-teen daughter, and dresses like a substitute teacher. One day, while parking his tan sedan in the "10-year associates" parking lot during family day at the office -- don't ask -- a confrontation occurs between Joe and salesman named Mark McKinney. No kids, not the guy from Kids in the Hall who crushes heads with his thumb and index finger, McKinney is played by Patrick Warburton, who stars in yet another bad movie role. After getting bitch-slapped in the most unbelievable scene in recent cinema memory, Joe retreats into a state of drunkenness, ashamed of failing in the eyes of his daughter and getting further pummeled by McKinney.

After emotional prodding by the company's "wellness director" Meg Harper (hotcake Julie Bowen), Joe is awakened from his corporate stupor and challenges McKinney to a rematch to regain his honor. In the process, Joe gains the admiration of the entire company, as everyone in the place appears somehow pissed off at him. On the road to recovery, Joe lands the promotion he always wanted, kicks ass at squash, leads fellow co-workers in karaoke, and eventually evolves into the kind of generic corporate schmuck that we all hate far worse than any big league bully.

Continue reading: Joe Somebody Review

Matthew Gross

Matthew Gross Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Filmmaker


Advertisement
Advertisement

Matthew Gross Movies

Fired Up! Movie Review

Fired Up! Movie Review

Broad and very silly, this comedy just about keeps us chuckling even when things get...

Advertisement
Across The Universe Movie Review

Across The Universe Movie Review

Julie Taymor's Across the Universe is a musical that tells its story through a couple...

Joe Somebody Movie Review

Joe Somebody Movie Review

The premise for Joe Somebody could fit on the back of a Cuban postcard....

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.