Matt Frewer

Matt Frewer

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Frankie & Alice Trailer


Frankie is a troubled African American go-go dancer in the 70s who begins a mental struggle when she repeatedly forgets large chunks of her life. She finds a crossword filled out in childish handwriting and an expensive designer dress in her wardrobe she doesn't remember purchasing among the various confusing clues suggesting there's something wrong. She is suffering from dissociative identity disorder (DID), more commonly known as multiple personality disorder, in which she possesses two alter-egos. One of them is Genius, a smart young child, while the other is the unashamedly racist Alice who appears to be a white woman with a Southern American accent. Unable to link these personalities together herself, the people around her - from friends and family to conquests and the authorities - are becoming desperately confused with her unpredictable behaviour and she is referred to a doctor who is determined to bring her out of her debilitating ordeal.

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50/50 Review


Excellent
Films about cancer aren't generally this funny. And while this movie isn't a comedy, beyond its generous dose of realistic humour, it has a smart, personal script that dares to face a difficult situation head on. And the light tone makes it hugely involving.

Young journalist Adam (Gordon-Levitt) is shocked to discover that his sore back is actually a rare tumour twithonly aa 50 percent survival rate. His girlfriend (Howard) promises to stick by him, best pal Kyle (Rogen) offers support, even as he uses Adam's illness to get girls, and Adam's mother (Huston) can't help but offer too much help. But he develops an awkward rapport with inexperienced therapist Katie (Kendrick) that actually does some good. And as his treatment sucks the life out of him, he finds two new friends in his fellow patients (Hall and Frewer).

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50/50 Trailer


Adam is twenty five years old and has a pretty good life. He works at a museum with his goofy best friend Kyle and has a beautiful girlfriend, Rachel. Generally speaking, Adam is in excellent health - until he is told that he has a rare form of cancer.

Continue: 50/50 Trailer

Hercules Review


Good
Tepid Disney animated entry is redeemed by self-referential jokes about merchandising, and James Woods' neat Hades. Probably the beginning of the Disney-mocking-Disney genre of animated films... something which has saved the studio in recent years.

The Positively True Adventures Of The Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom Review


Good
Hokey and jokey, this is a very faithful examination of an early 1990s case in Houston, Texas wherein an overagressive mother tried to ensure her daughter would make the cheerleading squad by hiring a hitman to kill one of the other girls and that girl's mother. Ultimately, the story is played for camp, which mostly works (thank God it's not one of those Amy Fisher movies!) on the back of Holly Hunter's titular big-haired mom. Shot mostly at the actual locations where the deeds were done, the movie gets its real kick when it comes time for everyone to sell their rights to Hollywood... with one writer remarking she has "Holly Hunter" in mind for the lead.

A Home At The End Of The World Review


Weak
An initially touching story that wilts under its own insignificance, A Home at the End of the World is the second film to be adapted from a Michael Cunningham novel, following the footsteps of The Hours, a work that, for all its flaws, A Home can't even come close to. In an opening that veers wildly, and not unpleasantly, between adolescent melodrama and wildly unintended farce, we are given the suburban Cleveland childhood of two buddies, Bobby Morrow and Jonathan Glover. Bobby's eyes were opened to the world at age nine in the late 1960s, when his older brother Carlton introduced him to the joys of acid and hanging out in graveyards.

A few years later, after the deaths of both Carlton and his mother, Bobby is a puppy-eyed teenager who inherited Carlton's magnetic personality and utter lack of guile, which is what attracts another teen, the gawkier Jonathan, to him. After his dad dies, Bobby moves permanently into the Glover household as a sort of unofficial adopted brother to Jonathan - except that they're brothers who occasionally make out and smoke joints with Mrs. Glover (Sissy Spacek). The rather uptight Jonathan (he wears glasses and has braces, you see) can't handle Bobby's openness and is more than a little jealous of how eagerly her mother has embraced him into their family, and their romantic relationship stalls.

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Cyberworld Review


Extraordinary
The critique of an IMAX film defies many of the standards against which traditional films are judged, if only because no IMAX picture to date has attempted anything like real storytelling (aside from maybe Wings of Courage, but that's another story). Nevertheless, these are films and it is our responsibility to give them our earnest criticism.

CyberWorld, brought to us in large part by the good people at Intel, is a lush visual trip in the spirit of The Mind's Eye and Beyond the Mind's Eye. In fact, some of the content appears to have been lifted directly out of these films.

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Hercules Review


Good
Tepid Disney animated entry is redeemed by self-referential jokes about merchandising, and James Woods' neat Hades. Probably the beginning of the Disney-mocking-Disney genre of animated films... something which has saved the studio in recent years.

Continue reading: Hercules Review

Twenty Bucks Review


Very Good
Check to the right... and that's only part of the cast. Movie stars great and small came out for this production, the ultimate production of a screenplay that's been floating around since the Great Depression -- seriously, it was originally written that long ago.

The story is simple: There's no real plot or central character -- aside from a $20 that makes it way from a random pickup across several days and dozens of handlers. From a homeless woman (Linda Hunt) intent on buying a lottery ticket with it to the G-string of a stripper (Melora Walters) to a pair of thieves (Christopher Lloyd and Steve Buscemi) to many more characters normal and exotic, the bill gets filthier and filthier until its ultimate demise (and rebirth, back in the hands of Hunt's street urchin).

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Dawn Of The Dead Review


Good

Cult horror fans, you can relax -- Universal Pictures has done right by George Romero.

The new bad-ass, big-budget "Dawn of the Dead" may be a liberty-taking re-envisioning of the zombie classic with speedier corpses and without the deeper human undertones of Romero's 1978 original, but the movie quickly builds to a sustained, spine-tingling crescendo from the very first sequence.

Art-house indie staple Sarah Polley ("Go," "Guinevere," "My Life Without Me") embraces her B-movie side with dignity as Ana, an overworked nurse at a busy hospital who keeps missing snippets of information that something ominous is happening. She hears that a patient who came in the night before with a small bite is now in Intensive Care and wonders why. On her way home from work she flips past the words "...not an isolated incident..." on her car radio while searching for music. She misses a news flash on the TV while taking a romantic shower with her husband before bed.

Continue reading: Dawn Of The Dead Review

Matt Frewer

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Relive Kate Bush's 2014 Live Show With 'Before The Dawn'

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The live album is set for released in November.

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The 'Sherlock' and 'Doctor Strange' star joined Gilmour onstage at the Royal Albert Hall for a rendition of the Pink Floyd classic.

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Chapter Three Of 'American Horror Story: Roanoke' Explains The Story Behind The Haunting (Spoilers)

Chapter Three Of 'American Horror Story: Roanoke' Explains The Story Behind The Haunting (Spoilers)

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Matt Frewer Movies

Frankie & Alice Trailer

Frankie & Alice Trailer

Frankie is a troubled African American go-go dancer in the 70s who begins a mental...

50/50 Movie Review

50/50 Movie Review

Films about cancer aren't generally this funny. And while this movie isn't a comedy, beyond...

50/50 Trailer

50/50 Trailer

Adam is twenty five years old and has a pretty good life. He works at...

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A Home At The End Of The World Movie Review

A Home At The End Of The World Movie Review

An initially touching story that wilts under its own insignificance, A Home at the End...

Cyberworld Movie Review

Cyberworld Movie Review

The critique of an IMAX film defies many of the standards against which traditional films...

Dawn Of The Dead Movie Review

Dawn Of The Dead Movie Review

Cult horror fans, you can relax -- Universal Pictures has done right by George Romero.The...

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