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Old Dogs Review


Terrible
To call this comedy a disaster is an understatement. It's aggressively awful, and manages to push its worst gags so numbingly off the scale that we're left slack-jawed in disbelief. Amazingly, the cast members just about get out alive.

Charlie and Dan (Travolta and Williams) are old pals and partners as sports publicists. Charlie is a relentless bachelor, teasing Dan about his impulsive, brief Vegas marriage to Vicki (Preston) eight years earlier. What neither of them knows is that Vicki gave birth to Dan's twins (Ella Bleu Travolta and Rayburn), and now she needs him to watch them for two weeks. Nutty antics ensue as these cute kids upset these men's life, dragging them off for a weekend camping trip and of course slowly winning them over in the process.

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Matt Dillon - Thursday 4th March 2010 at Beverly Hilton Hotel Beverly Hills, California

Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon

Matt Dillon and Charlotte Ronson - Friday 12th February 2010 at New York Fashion Week New York City, USA

Matt Dillon and Charlotte Ronson
Matt Dillon and Charlotte Ronson

Armoured Trailer


Watch the trailer for Armoured

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Matt Dillon - Tuesday 1st December 2009 at Independent Spirit Awards Los Angeles, California

Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon and Taraji P. Henson
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon and Taraji P. Henson
Matt Dillon and Taraji P. Henson
Matt Dillon and Taraji P. Henson

Old Dogs Trailer


Watch the trailer for Old Dogs

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Matt Dillon Tuesday 23rd June 2009 Persol 'Incognito Design' Exhibition Opening held at The Whitney Museum New York City, USA

Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon and Pierre
Matt Dillon

Matt Dillon Tuesday 27th January 2009 Riverkeeper's Reflected Light IV auction and cocktail party at the IAC buliding New York City, USA

Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon

Matt Dillon, Charles Barkley and Whitney Houston Friday 22nd August 2003 This week, two famous faces were held in the U.S. for alleged driving offences

Matt Dillon, Charles Barkley and Whitney Houston

Matt Dillon Tuesday 8th August 2006

Matt Dillon

Matt Dillon Matt Dillon Mugshot

Matt Dillon

Matt Dillon Monday 8th December 2008 arrives to the screening of The Wrestler New York City, USA

Matt Dillon

Matt Dillon Sunday 9th November 2008 AFI Film Festival 2008 ' Premiere of 'Defiance' - held at the Arclight Theatre Hollywood, California

Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon

Matt Dillon, Adrian Grenier, HBO and Jeremy Piven - Matt Dillon, Jerry Ferarra, Jeremy Piven, Adrian Grenier and Kevin Connolly Los Angeles, California - on the set of the HBO series 'Entourage' Monday 18th August 2008

Matt Dillon, Adrian Grenier, Hbo and Jeremy Piven

Matt Dillon - Saturday 23rd February 2008 at Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica, California

Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon

Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten Review


Excellent
The flames from the bonfires around which the participants in Julien Temple's loving filmic portrait Joe Strummer: The Future is Unwritten helps bring something more to their faces and words than the cold glare of a documentarian's prying camera. Warmth, heat, honesty... whatever it is, that factor is a large part of what makes this documentary such a rollicking, damn near inspirational film, since these people for the most part don't appear to be simply spitting words at an interviewer in the standard manner of a documentary, but rather conversing. They're not being interviewed, it seems, but just talking, telling stories around a fire to whomever happens to be listening (as one does), helping the crackling flames keep back the circle of night by remembering one of the century's most astounding and inexplicable talents.

A child of British diplomats who was always keenly embarrassed of his public school education and refers to himself as "a mouthy little git," Strummer was squatting in London with gypsies in the mid-1970s, busking for food money, playing in a pub band called the 101ers, and generally charming the pants off of everyone he met. It was a hand-to-mouth existence, but seemed like the kind of thing Strummer could do for years, living his beloved lowlife. Then he was being introduced to a trio of short-haired punks, The Clash was formed, and Strummer was on his way to rock stardom. He wasn't a singer, he was a yelper (as some fantastic footage of him laying down the vocal track for "White Riot" shows particularly well), a snaggletoothed smoker with a penchant for nonsensical lyrics and overblown statements. But in Strummer's work, with The Clash and afterwards, there always rang true a tone of absolute and unmistakable sincerity, sung and played with complete conviction each and every time. This was a man without irony, leading a band that set the model for all the conscious groups which would follow (tellingly, Bono is one of the interviewees here, talking about The Clash being his first concert, and in short the reason he got into music).

Continue reading: Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten Review

Matt Dillon Monday 14th May 2007 Soho Rep’s 2007 Spring Gala at 101 Riverviews. New York City, USA

Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon

Matt Dillon Tuesday 22nd May 2007 New York Premiere of 'Crazy Love' held at the Beekman Theatre New York City, USA

Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon
Matt Dillon

Crash (2005) Review


Excellent
In Crash, a simple car accident forms an unyielding foundation for the complex exploration of race and prejudice. Thoroughly repulsive throughout, but incredibly thought provoking long after, Paul Haggis' breathtaking directorial debut succeeds in bringing to the forefront the behaviors that many people keep under their skin. And by thrusting these attitudes toward us with a highly calculated, reckless abandon, Haggis puts racism on the highest pedestal for our review.

There is no better place for this examination than the culturally diverse melting pot of modern-day Los Angeles. In just over 24 hours, Crash brings together people from all walks of life. Two philosophizing black men (Ludacris and Larenz Tate) steal the expensive SUV belonging to the white, L.A. District Attorney (Brendan Fraser), and his high-strung wife (Sandra Bullock). A similar vehicle belonging to a wealthy black television director (Terrence Howard) and his wife (Thandie Newton) is later pulled over by a racist cop (Matt Dillon) and his partner (Ryan Phillippe). Soon, many of these people get mixed up with a Latino locksmith (Michael Peña), a Persian storekeeper (Shaun Toub), and two ethnically diverse, dating police detectives (Don Cheadle and Jennifer Esposito).

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Loverboy Review


Bad
Much like Robert Towne's recent adaptation of Ask the Dust, Kevin Bacon's Loverboy is a labor of love. Sometime in 2003, Kyra Sedgwick (Bacon's spouse) handed him a copy of Victoria Redel's novel, Loverboy, and both found themselves eager to bring the story to the screen. And similar to Towne's effort, Bacon is so enthusiastic about the material that he can't get his concentration correct.

Emily Stoll (Sedgwick) is in her late 20s and roaming the Midwest and just about everywhere else for the right ejaculate. After a miscarriage from a "no father," multi-partner pregnancy, she meets Paul (Campbell Scott) and in one night of passion, a child is conceived. The son, Paul aka Loverboy (Dominic Scott Kay), quickly becomes Emily's entire life, trying to make life a magical, ongoing discovery. Emily has nightmarish flashbacks of her lovebird parents (Bacon and Marisa Tomei) who were too busy being in love to take care of a child properly, and she daydreams of her fantasy mother, Mrs. Harker (Sandra Bullock). Loverboy eventually becomes wise to his mother's obsessive grasp on him and begins to revolt, especially when she tries to seduce Mark (Matt Dillon), a father figure. This, of course, can't end well.

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Once In A Lifetime: The Extraordinary Story Of The New York Cosmos Review


Very Good
Like most people, I couldn't care less about professional soccer, but the U.S. in the 1970s is a wholly different story. Hell, from the exhorbitant length of the title of Once in a Lifetime: The Extraordinary Story of the New York Cosmos alone you can tell that this particular era in soccer history really resonated.

And kudos to Once in a Lifetime for jogging my memory about one of the most peculiar eras in pro sports. For a few short years, pro soccer teams were selling out some of the largest venues in America: 75,000 would turn out to watch the New York Cosmos (with superstar Pelé at the helm) kick a little white ball around on a giant field of grass. By comparison, the most popular team in baseball, the New York Yankees, currently draw about 52,000 people to see each game.

Continue reading: Once In A Lifetime: The Extraordinary Story Of The New York Cosmos Review

Factotum Review


Very Good
While Bent Hamer's Factotum isn't equal to the source material, it's a must-see for all of us fascinated by Charles Bukowski, by his persona as much as his words. Adapted from the namesake novel by Hamer and Jim Stark, Factotum's central character is Henry Chinaski, Bukowski's fictional alter ego who, like its author, is a shambling, hard-drinking writer, slumming away at odd jobs, quartering in hole-in-the-wall apartments, while he scrawls away at poems and stories every chance he gets.To watch Matt Dillon personify Chinaski/Bukowski is thrilling: At least from outward appearance, the actor has nailed the role, and, at times, he seems to be channeling Bukowski from the grave. It's an eerie simulacrum: Dillon skulks about the screen, slouch-shouldered, sporting a scruffy beard, a mane of combed-back hair, wearing the short-sleeves and slacks that was Bukowski's standard wardrobe, regarding the world with hangdog eyes and a jaw jutting outward in a subtle show of defiance.Equally arresting is the always-fantastic Lili Taylor, playing Chinaski's on-again, off-again girlfriend, Jan. She's his kindred spirit, which means the two get along best with a jug of wine between them. As Jan, Taylor projects a mannish energy. Wearing a perpetual sneer, keeping her frayed hair and shoulders tossed back, she enters any room like she's spoiling for a fight. Jan is also fiercely possessive of Chinaski and panics whenever any windfall threatens their low-rent, booze-sodden lifestyle. She's also the only person who can push the bearish Chinaski's buttons. When they break up, their trails lead back to each other and entwine, as before, then wind apart again, exactly like twin DNA strands.Chinaski's search for work and his rocky relationship with Jan form Factotum's nominal narrative thread. No sooner does Chinaski land a job that he gets bored with it or chafes under the authority of white-collar boobs, and leaves. He hates them so much -- in the same way he hates his father (as one scene implies) -- that he defies their authority in ways both direct and passive-aggressive: After one boss, finding him at a local dive instead of on the job, fires him, Chinaski calmly replies by offering him a drink. Midway through Factotum, we get a romantic interlude of sorts involving Laura (Marisa Tomei), a gold-digging floozy. Laura's got her hands in the pockets of a moneyed, European eccentric (Didier Flamand) who offers wayward women asylum in his morgue-like home. Chinaski's sojourn with Laura and her ilk takes Factotum into outer David Lynch territory, and, somehow, we're glad when Chinaski breaks free of them and returns to his sunnier, native habitat of the urban jungle.Like Post Office and Ham on Rye, Factotum is ultimately a chronicle of its author's anxious, unconquerable desire to write, to transcribe his toils, obsessions, and pains into the stuff of art. Beneath Bukowski's reticent surface, fires raged -- stoked by the man's angry, lustful, transgressive emotions. Words plucked from those fires were then hammered into shape and branded onto the page. It's that smoldering quality in the prose that missing in Stark and Hamer's handling -- the contradiction between the inner and outer dimensions of the writer. Rather than finding an expressive style that rendered the world as grotesquely as Chinaski sees it, a style to counterpoint the character's calm, composed exterior, the material settles for a safe, neutered approach. This Factotum is more eager and willing to put Bukowski's words in prettily composed frames. Hamer and Stark only get the outlines of Chinaski's life right -- the hand-to-mouth living and boozing in which all that spiritually sustains the writer are the hours spent hunched over his notepad with a ballpoint pen. Finally, Dillon and Taylor are the sources of Factotum's vitriol and sharpness. They seem willing to delve where Hamer's direction dare not go.Last call.

You, Me And Dupree Review


Terrible
Entertainment gossip trackers shamelessly debate an actor's chosen sexuality in much the same way that baseball fans discuss a player's stats. Is he gay? Is she bisexual? Some even make broad assumptions that everyone in Hollywood bats for the proverbial "other team."

Such a proclamation borders on absurd, and yet it's becoming more difficult to entirely refute the claim. This year, Ang Lee's Brokeback Mountain earned sweeping critical praise and a handful of Oscar nominations, losing a tight Best Picture race to Crash. Even during the summer, when audiences typically are lured to theaters by testosterone-soaked summer blockbusters, it's Johnny Depp's fey, ambiguous, and decidedly swishy Capt. Jack Sparrow who has sailed to the front of the box-office pack.

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In & Out Review


Weak
Lackluster and highly overrated film about a small town schoolteacher who is outed on national TV. The stir it creates in the town is one helluva hootnanny! Or so we are supposed to believe. Droll and not very funny, saved only be a great performance by Kline. Somehow Cusack got an Oscar nomination out of this thing, which proves that, yes, the fix really is in.

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There's Something About Mary Review


Excellent
Sure it's ridiculous. Sure it's in generally poor taste. So what? That's what makes There's Something About Mary so good.

If you've seen the trailer, you know the story: Ted (Ben Stiller) finally gets to go out with Mary (Cameron Diaz) to the prom and is stymied by a freak zipper accident, sending him into years of therapy to wonder what-coulda-been. Thirteen years later, we find that he's not the only one fixated on Mary... as no fewer than five suitors appear to win her heart.

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One Night At McCool's Review


Weak
There are three things that are laugh-worthy in the Farrelly Brothers wannabe, One Night at McCool's: a greasy pompadour-ed Michael Douglas mimicking a blowjob by flapping one of cheeks/jowls with his index finger and thumb, Andrew "Dice" Clay (yes, this is for real), and Paul Reiser meeting a nasty end. And one of these bits is already given away in the TV ads. Thankfully, it's the one that I personally find the most redeeming moment of this generally unlikable movie.

While There's Something About Mary was clever and funny, it has unfortunately spawned some extremely bad imitators that take increasingly lower roads to getting laughs. McCool's definitely has slid the taste meter down a few notches, and it doesn't even pay off. Even for those of us who get a kick out of dumb and vulgar gags, this latest poseur has nothing else to prop it up. The plot is never once fun or engrossing. The characters are repellant, and not even in an entertaining or over-the-top way. And the comedy relies way too heavily on us chuckling at an Oscar winner dressed in a ridiculous pimp-like get-up and regularly using the "P" word, or Reiser scampering around in nothing but S&M bondage gear and leather chaps.

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Singles Review


Very Good
Crowe's guilty pleasure of a confection outlines the struggles of Gen-X singles in the 1990s, but doesn't portray a wholly realistic version of them. Instead, Singles survives on its charming humor and inadvertant status as the de facto chronicle of the Seattle grunge scene. Watch for endless cameos and stars who would later go on to much higher heights.

Albino Alligator Review


Very Good
One of a growing list of recent directorial debuts by actors, Albino Alligator is Kevin Spacey's (Best Supporting Actor winner from The Usual Suspects) baby, and his film is probably the best of the lot. Because with this movie, Spacey proves that he can work just as well on either side of the camera.

A "box drama" of classic design, Albino Alligator is a psychological thriller set largely inside a New Orleans Prohibition-era bar still open in the 1990s. Dova (Matt Dillon), Milo (Gary Sinise), and Law (William Fichtner) are criminals on the run. After killing three cops with their car, the trio holes up in Dino's Last Chance Bar until things cool over, but the cops catch up with them soon enough. A game of cat-and-mouse hostage negotiation ensues, with Faye Dunaway, Viggo Mortensen, Skeet Ulrich, John Spencer, & M. Emmet Walsh as the victims, and Joe Mantegna as the head cop on the case.

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City Of Ghosts Review


Very Good
Lest you think all actors are suddenly turning into directors, (as in George Clooney's 2002 Confessions of a Dangerous Mind) let me point out that it's not a new phenomenon (Kenneth Branagh's 1989 Dead Again). So, there's nothing extraordinary about Matt Dillon directing (and co-writing and acting in) City of Ghosts. And what he's turned in here for his theatrical film debut is a rather atmospheric journey set within the corrupt, decrepit precincts of Cambodia with plenty of opportunities for tension and intrigue.

The question is whether he developed his story to take full advantage of the setting for Asian mystery (this is the first film shot entirely in Cambodia since 1964) and the cutthroat characters that people it -- at least in fiction. Unfortunately, writer-director Dillon evokes the color and the mystery without quite managing to create gut-gripping drama. The flaw is in the content.

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Over The Edge Review


Good
Now that most of America seems to live in soulless planned communities and gated subdivisions, it's fun to remember that 25 or so years ago, a wave of films -- think Poltergeist -- were suggesting that maybe this kind of lifestyle wasn't conducive to happy families and healthy communities.

It all began back in 1979 with Over the Edge, a tight teen melodrama that takes place in the godforsaken New Granada, a rapidly expanding subdivision on a treeless plain somewhere in the southwest (the film was shot in Aurora, Colorado). All these years later, the movie is notable for two things: its dead-on accurate depiction of late '70s teen style, and the riveting debut performance of young Matt Dillon, who has as much on-screen charisma at age 15 as experienced actors twice his age.

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To Die For Review


Good
Gus Van Sant's new, much-hyped farce/thriller is finally here, and with it arrives the director's best feature and Nicole Kidman's strongest performance. To Die For, the tale of Suzanne Stone (Kidman), a sexy newswoman wannabe who'll do anything to get on television, is entertaining and funny, but pulls its punches by never taking the farce of its story far enough.

Told in half-flashback, half-mockumentary style, the film traces the events leading up to the murder of the Suzanne's husband, Larry (Matt Dillon). We see Suzanne trying to get ahead in the media world, carving out a career for herself at a low budget cable station. We also see large stretches of Suzanne creating a meaningless documentary about modern teenagers, wherein three kids (including drugged-out zombie Jimmy, played by an unwatchable Joaquin Phoenix) are interviewed ad nauseam. All the while, key relatives try to get to the bottom of the mystery: who killed Larry, and why?

Continue reading: To Die For Review

Crash Review


Good
A meditation on the often unacknowledged undercurrentsof racism in everyday American city life, "Crash" has the kindof broad appeal that can draw large audiences and the kind of lingeringemotional potency that can lead to serious soul-searching.

An impressive ensemble cast lends strong character to acultural cross-section of Los Angeles denizens who are connected to eachother through crime, corruption, obligation, indignation and chance overa two-day period. The most powerful storyline features Matt Dillon andRyan Phillippe as beat cops -- one jaded and abusive, the other fresh andidealistic -- who pull over and harass (much to Phillippe's dismay) a blackyuppie couple (Terrence Howard and Thandie Newton) because the SUV they'redriving vaguely fits the description of a carjacked vehicle.

Within 24 hours, these characters all cross paths againin separate incidents of incredibly high tension that challenge both theprejudices that have formed between them and the conclusions we've beenled to as an audience.

Although they do not meet again, similarly potent table-turningand judgment-testing events occur in the lives of the actual carjackers(Larenz Tate and rapper Ludacris, whose character is ironically obsessedwith being stereotyped) and their victims, an ambitious district attorneyand his uptight wife (played with depth and conviction by Brendan Fraserand Sandra Bullock).

Continue reading: Crash Review

One Night At McCool's Review


OK

There is a gold mine of comedy to be found in the impetuous and foolhardy things men will do when dumbstruck by a beautiful girl. I should know -- I cringe to think how funny I've may have been over the years.

Potentially even funnier are the kinds of things men will do when the beautiful girl is a femme fatale who has no qualms about taking advantage of the fact that her mere presence makes guys brains shut down.

In "One Night at McCool's" the femme fatale is played by Liv Tyler (now that's what I call great casting!), and she has Matt Dillon, John Goodman and Paul Reiser wrapped around her little finger.

Continue reading: One Night At McCool's Review

Matt Dillon

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Matt Dillon

Date of birth

18th February, 1964

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.83




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Matt Dillon Movies

Going in Style Movie Review

Going in Style Movie Review

This is only technically a remake of the iconic 1979 film starring movie icons George...

Rock Dog Trailer

Rock Dog Trailer

Bodi is a Tibetan Mastiff who's tired of his life on Snow Mountain where his...

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Going In Style Trailer

Going In Style Trailer

There comes a point in life where you get to a certain age and realise...

The Art Of The Steal Trailer

The Art Of The Steal Trailer

Crunch Calhoun is a motorcycle stunt artist and former art thief who caused himself some...

Hustlers Trailer

Hustlers Trailer

The pawn shop is the last resort for most broke people; the place where the...

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Girl Most Likely Movie Review

Girl Most Likely Movie Review

Even though this comedy has a tendency to dip into cartoonish silliness, it's anchored by...

Girl Most Likely Trailer

Girl Most Likely Trailer

Imogene cannot seem to move on from her unsuccessful career as a playwright in New...

Takers Movie Review

Takers Movie Review

Loud and very violent (within the limits of a PG-13 rating), this supposedly gritty thriller...

Takers Trailer

Takers Trailer

Up until now Gordon Cozier and his bank robber gang have remained one of the...

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