Mataichiro Yamamoto

Mataichiro Yamamoto

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Azumi Review


Very Good
When underground director Ryuhei Kitamura announced that he'd be making Azumi, his first film inside the Japanese studio system after a successful run of independent films (Versus, Aragami), fans may have had just cause to fear. Not only was he joining the mainstream machine, but he was also directing -- for the first time -- a script in which he had no hand. As it turns out, there's no need for concern.

Azumi opens in war-torn feudal Japan. A clan of assassins, raised from youth by their master Gessai (Yoshio Harada, resembling no one so much as a Japanese Burt Reynolds), endeavor to wipe out three warlords bent on waging yet another bloody struggle to rule the country.

Continue reading: Azumi Review

Mishima: A Life In Four Chapters Review


Very Good
I'm not familiar with Yukio Mishima's work as a writer, but Paul Schrader obviously is. This intricate portrait of Mishima's life -- intertwened with sequences dramatized from his novels and other works -- is unlike many cinematic biographies you've ever seen. Mishima (Ken Ogata) isn't just a rebel and a bisexual, he's borderline insane and suicidal to boot: His 1970 death by ritual decapitation is apparently what he's best known for today. Mishima lays out the man's life (though fictionalized) in all its glory and horror, and anyone with a passing interest in Japanese literature will be held in thrall by Schrader's work. (It's aided considerably by a haunting Philip Glass score.)

Azumi Review


Very Good
When underground director Ryuhei Kitamura announced that he'd be making Azumi, his first film inside the Japanese studio system after a successful run of independent films (Versus, Aragami), fans may have had just cause to fear. Not only was he joining the mainstream machine, but he was also directing -- for the first time -- a script in which he had no hand. As it turns out, there's no need for concern.

Azumi opens in war-torn feudal Japan. A clan of assassins, raised from youth by their master Gessai (Yoshio Harada, resembling no one so much as a Japanese Burt Reynolds), endeavor to wipe out three warlords bent on waging yet another bloody struggle to rule the country.

Continue reading: Azumi Review

Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust Review


Good
I love Japanese anime on the big screen. The gorgeous colors, the daunting cel animation detailing the smallest blades of grass, the complex storylines and character designs, and the thundering soundtrack. And the impending release of Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust has made me wet with anticipation.

The original Vampire Hunter D was produced for video only in 1985. Its twisted violence, a plot thick with deception and honor, perverted sex scenes, and beautiful acts of heads and limbs being lopped off are a D&D geek's wet dream. Based upon volume three of Hideyuki Kikuchi's Vampire Hunter D novel series, Bloodlust follows the continuing story of D and his travels as a vampire hunter for hire.

Continue reading: Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust Review

Mataichiro Yamamoto

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Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 - Trailer

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 - Trailer

The Guardians return two months after their epic battle against Ronan with their criminal records erased

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