Master P

Master P

Master P Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Comments Quotes RSS

Master P performs at DGK X GPEN launch party

Master P - Photo's from the DGK X GPEN launch party which saw American Rapper Master P give a live performance in Long Beach, California, United States - Monday 5th January 2015

Master P and Boo Johnson
Master P
Master P
Master P and Boo Johnson
Master P, Eli Soto and Stevie Williams

at 'Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection' New York premiere at AMC Lincoln Square Theater

Master P and Romeo Miller - Cymphonique Miller, Master P., Romeo Miller, and two other sons, Tuesday 26th June 2012 at 'Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection' New York premiere at AMC Lincoln Square Theater

at 'Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection' New York premiere at AMC Lincoln Square Theater

Master P and Romeo Miller - Cymphonique Miller, Master P., Romeo Miller, Tuesday 26th June 2012 at 'Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection' New York premiere at AMC Lincoln Square Theater

at 'Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection' New York premiere at AMC Lincoln Square Theater

Gayle King and Master P - Gayle King, Master P, Tuesday 26th June 2012 at 'Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection' New York premiere at AMC Lincoln Square Theater

at 'Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection' New York premiere at AMC Lincoln Square Theater

Master P - Master P, Tuesday 26th June 2012 at 'Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection' New York premiere at AMC Lincoln Square Theater

Master P - Make Em Say Uhh


Master P - Ghetto D


Undisputed Review


OK
The last of his breed of filmmakers, Walter Hill is a prolific, old-school screenwriter/director who's worked in everything: sci-fi, westerns, musicals, noir thrillers, comedies, and action. Over the last couple decades, Hill has produced a plethora of notable gems such as Streets of Fire, 48 Hours, The Warriors, and Southern Comfort. His latest flick - Undisputed - falls smack dab in the middle of cinematic quality: A straightforward tale of two lone, boxing warriors going head to head (and toe to toe) inside a microcosm of violence, power, and greed fueled by the almighty dollar.

Ten years ago, rising boxing superstar Monroe Hutchen (Wesley Snipes) was sent up for life imprisonment due to a fit of passionate and murderous rage. He's serving time in Sweetwater Prison in the Mojave Desert and continues to box in the Inter-Prison Boxing Program with a flawless record and the title of undisputed champion. To prove that he could have amounted to something outside the prison walls, Hutchen unexpectedly gets his chance to fight the undisputed World Heavyweight Champion, George "Iceman" Chambers (Ving Rhames), an arrogant megalomaniac who has recently been sent up for six to eight years for a charge of rape. Hmm, who does that sounds like?

Continue reading: Undisputed Review

Foolish Review


Terrible
Eddie Griffin plays Foolish Waise (har har!), a comic enlisted to help his brother (Master P) open up a new stand-up club. Pretty much a bad excuse to work in stand-up material courtesy of Griffin, scenes with Andrew Dice Clay, and buxom, naked chicks.

Continue reading: Foolish Review

Track Down Review


Grim
For this film review, we begin with a history lesson. Kevin Mitnick stands as probably the most famous, the most notorious, and the most successful computer hacker of all time. After nearly 15 years of hacking (alternating with jail and probation time), he was finally apprehended for the last time in 1995, for a collection of tech crimes. and was released from prison in early 2000. (The story of his questionably legal incarceration is itself enough material for a book and a movie.) I interviewed Mitnick shortly after his release; today he's a computer security consultant (though he's not allowed to touch a computer as a term of his release).

Track Downwas produced shortly before Mitnick's release amid much controversy. Mitnick, as you might expect, is a cause celebre among the hacker community, while he's been vilified by the corporate and legal communities. The story of his long career as a hacker was the subject of two major books -- The Fugitive Game, written mainly from Mitnick's point of view, and Takedown, written by the man who captured him. The latter book (widely dismissed by the hacker community as propaganda) got optioned by Miramax, and against all odds, the Kevin Mitnick story became a movie, starring Skeet Ulrich as Mitnick and Russell Wong as Tsutomu Shimomura, the man who "captured" Mitnick and the co-author of Takedown.

Continue reading: Track Down Review

I Got the Hook Up Review


Unbearable
Asinine. Offensive. Unredeeming. Shockingly bad. Stupid. An utter waste of time.

Continue reading: I Got the Hook Up Review

Scary Movie 3 Review


OK

The "Scary Movie" horror spoofs must be some kind of mutant, alien movie franchise. There's just no other explanation for the fact that the sequels actually keep getting better. And unlike the hilarious but indefensibly scattershot second installment, "Scary Movie 3" even has a coherent combo-platter plot.

Serving up campy twists on The Ring's" killer-videotape plot and the alien invasion from Signs" -- with a little mock-"8 Mile" thrown in for flava -- the story catches up with wide-eyed dingbat heroine Anna Faris (who goofed on Neve Campbell's "Scream" character in the first two films) after she has become a blonde TV reporter (a la Naomi Watts in "The Ring") who discovers the creepy VHS cassette that curses anyone who watches it to die horribly in seven days. But when she tries to warn the world of its dangers, her producer puts his foot down: "No more paranoid on-air rants about the supernatural!"

Meanwhile Charlie Sheen -- returning to the kind of parody he showed such a deadpan knack for in 1991's "Hot Shots!" -- plays a farmer and former priest (shades of Mel Gibson in "Signs") whose cornfields have been flattened in a mysterious "crop circle" that from above reads "Attack Here!" with an arrow pointing to his house.

Continue reading: Scary Movie 3 Review

Undisputed Review


Grim

It's difficult to make yourself care who wins the big fight in the prison boxing B-movie "Undisputed." Should you root for Wesley Snipes as the former pro pug who beat his girlfriend's "other man" to death with his bare hands? Or should you root for Ving Rhames as the arrogant, angry world heavyweight champion, freshly stripped of his title and locked up after being convicted of rape?

The whole movie is little more than a slow build-up to their cage-match-style bout behind bars and razor wire in the last 10 minutes, so pick a horse -- if you can. Snipes spends most of the picture off-screen, locked in solitary confinement, gluing together a popsicle stick pagoda. So all we know about him is that he says he always keeps his cool (except, of course, for that one time he killed a man) and that he's been the champ of the underground big house boxing league (run by inmate mafioso Peter Falk) since he was sent up for life 10 years ago.

Meanwhile, new arrival Rhames spends the movie blustering around the prison yard, bullying everyone from the cell block sissy to prison gang leaders to the spineless warden.

Continue reading: Undisputed Review

Hollywood Homicide Review


OK

"Hollywood Homicide" is a sly satire of buddy-cop action-comedies that replicates the genre's trappings so precisely many moviegoers will mistake it for a genuinely bad buddy-cop action-comedy.

The vaguely ridiculous title and overtly assembly-line plot all by themselves had me dreading the press screening. A handsome, aging, grumpy detective (Harrison Ford) in a wise-cracking reluctant partnership with a handsome rookie detective (Josh Hartnett), both of whom are way out of their depths investigating the gunning down of a rap group in a hip-hop club? Talk about knee-deep in Hollywood pig slop.

But writer-director Ron Shelton ("Tin Cup," "Bull Durham") -- who wrote this film just after completing his for-hire helming of the genuinely cliché-riddled L.A. cop drama "Dark Blue" -- embraces this ostensible triteness and reshapes it into comedy of the absurd without being conspicuously ironic or self-aware. "Hollywood Homicide" is often authentically slapdash, shallow and hackneyed because its mockery of Hollywood's pre-fabricated blockbuster mentality is meant to sneak up on you.

Continue reading: Hollywood Homicide Review

Master P

Master P Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Comments Quotes RSS