Mary Stuart Masterson

Mary Stuart Masterson

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Tribeca Film Festival - 'NOW: In the Wings on a World Stage'

Mary Stuart Masterson - 2014 Tribeca Film Festival - 'NOW: In the Wings on a World Stage' at BMCC Tribeca PAC - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 21st April 2014

Mary Stuart Masterson
Mary Stuart Masterson
Mary Stuart Masterson

Opening Night of 'Stage Kiss' - Arrivals

Jeremy Davidson and Mary Stuart Masterson - Opening night of the play 'Stage Kiss' at Playwrights Horizons Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Sunday 2nd March 2014

Jeremy Davidson and Mary Stuart Masterson

Picture - Mary Stuart Masterson and Jeremy... New York City, USA, Sunday 17th May 2009

Mary Stuart Masterson and Jeremy Davidson - Mary Stuart Masterson and Jeremy Davidson New York City, USA - 54th Annual Drama Desk Awards held at LaGuardia Concert Hall at Lincoln Center Sunday 17th May 2009

The Cake Eaters Review


Grim
The Cake Eaters reminds me of what an IFC Original Soap Opera might look like. All of the characters are loosely interconnected in some non-specific small-town setting, and the individual stories so deliberately exist on separate planes that the film can never possibly attain coherence. It is episodic, melodramatic, and oddly tepid -- all of the emotions seem propelled by the disingenuous desire to make an Enlightening Indie Drama. Surely the film wants to be a thoughtful, profound emo-weepie, but it contains all the insight of a Hallmark Movie of the Week.

The film tells the very simple story of how three generations of men deal with the death of one woman, their mother (for two) and wife (for one). Aaron Stanford is the twentysomething slacker who works in a high school cafeteria and is very protective of his deceased mom. Bruce Dern plays the aging father who carries on a long-term affair with a local shopkeeper (Elizabeth Ashley). Jayce Bartok is the elder son, a struggling musician who returns home when he hears the sad news, apparently just to look morose as he walks around town.

Continue reading: The Cake Eaters Review

Some Kind of Wonderful Review


Good
John Hughes isn't best known for Some Kind of Wonderful, but ode to highschool misfits has its adherants, and sure enough it's one of his more grounded and lovable films.

Not as depressing as Pretty in Pink, not as random as The Breakfast Club, the film is a typical Hughesian love triangle among the short-haired semi-butch drummer girl (Mary Stuart Masterson), the sensitive (yet poor) painter (Eric Stoltz), and the class beauty who doesn't have money but runs in rich circles (Lea Thompson). Masterson clearly pines for her best friend Stoltz, but he either can't see it or won't see it. Besides, Thompson has perfectly '80s red hair. Naturally, the beefy, Miami Vice-dressing boyfriend (Craig Sheffer) wants nothing more than to pummel the guy who's pining for his lady.

Continue reading: Some Kind of Wonderful Review

The Sisters Review


Terrible
Films have certain advantages over stage plays - locations can shift, laws of physics need not apply, and characters can do more than stand around and talk ad nauseam. Unfortunately, no one shared this world of possibilities with the makers of The Sisters, an aggressively frustrating and ultimately nonsensical waste of time and talent.The titular Prior sisters, hyper-literate and unlikable to a one, are conveniently categorized archetypes capable of little beyond petty bickering. There's the oldest, Olga (Mary Stuart Masterson), cold, repressed, and overly rational; the middle, Marcia (Maria Bello), whose vicious unhappiness has turned her into predatory shrew; and baby Irene (Erika Christensen), the idealistic peacemaker. The family, along with brother Andrew (Nivola), a spineless placeholder, and various relatives and hangers-on, assembles regularly for festive occasions as heartwarming as a pack of coyotes fighting over a kill.The melodrama is intimate but overly full of histrionics: Marcia is trapped in an awful marriage to an equally bilious psychologist and tempted into an affair - after approximately an hour of acquaintance - with a former student of her father's (Tony Goldwyn); two different professors (one acerbic, the other puppyish) are in love with the oblivious Irene; the entire family hates Andrew's trashy fiancée, Nancy. Each conflict plays out in vicious familial attacks and endless, self-congratulatory, falsely profound dialogue.The Sisters is based on the Chekov play Three Sisters, and I will title that Problem #1: It sticks too closely to the devices of the original. In Chekov's time, an unhappy marriage was permanent, love could be so socially unacceptable it was rendered unmentionable, and repression was a legitimate way of life. In a modern setting, the confines are simply not as limiting as the characters would like to believe. Marcia makes no secret of being violently miserable in her marriage and communicates with her husband solely in hurled vitriol, and yet she stays! For no good reason! This isn't a tragic character; she's a woe-is-me-martyr, and impossible to like for it.Problem #2 is in the adaptation of the piece from a stage play to the screen. I'd guess that, in the process, Richard Alfeiri was reluctant to make any significant alterations to his original or offer many concessions to the medium, because this reads exactly like a play. That isn't a complement; these characters do nothing but talk. In a stage setting, audiences are willing to put up with florid language, but for film, the dialogue is ridiculous. Characters pack every sentence with as many 50-cent-words possible - why say "live" when "inhabit" has so many more syllables? During one (of many) heated arguments, one sister actually says to another, "You do not understand my complexities enough to analyze and categorize me!" I wish I were making that up, or that it were an anomaly. But no, they are all so pleased with themselves, with their endless babble about the "nature of their truth" that every sentence furthers the desire to slap each and every character. Hard.Probably the biggest problem with The Sisters, however, is how great a waste it is. Despite the irritating script and visuals that are so sporadically fanciful that it looks as though Arthur Allan Seidelman is discovering the effects features on Final Cut Pro and wants to show them off, the cast is uniformly stellar. Bello's Marcia is deplorable, but she acts the hell out of her; same goes for Masterson and Elizabeth Banks as the uniformly reviled Nancy. All, really, are much better than the material given, so it is unclear what possessed such a rock-sold cast to sign on to such a screenplay, but at least their presence makes the film occasionally bearable.

Digging To China Review


Terrible
Kevin Bacon as a retarded man? You may not buy the acting, but you'll believe it as fact when you see the debacle he throws out in this hackneyed, awful film (retarded man befriends naive young girl). This ain't no Gilbert Grape, that's for sure. Avoid.

Leo Review


Grim
With Shakespeare in Love now six years behind us, Joseph Fiennes may never star in a tolerable movie again.

The blandly-titled Leo is the story of the titular boy (Davis Sweat), the illegitimate son of a sudden widow (Elisabeth Shue), who corresponds with a felon (Fiennes) via mail. Felon gets out, and these two men slowly converge upon one another, though something odd about the movie compels us to wonder if there isn't a deeper connection. Some big names parade through the film, almost at random, including a mopey Sam Shepard and a ridiculously over-the-top Dennis Hopper, who strikes the film's most curious note when he cracks an egg and smears it on Deborah Unger's thighs.

Continue reading: Leo Review

Heaven's Prisoners Review


Grim
A promising movie about a troubled couple who witness a bad, digital-effect plane crash and adopt the sole survivor, a young Salvadoran girl, gets stupid after 35 minutes when it degenerates into a witch hunt after the wife gets killed. You know, for seeing something she wasn't supposed to. Whatever. Two long and convoluted hours make Heaven's Prisoners an exercise in tedium.

Funny About Love Review


OK
Funny fact about Funny About Love: Though the box cover and poster feature Gene Wilder with a baby on his head, there's no baby in this movie. At least not until the last two minutes... and it's not even Wilder's!

In fact, people expecting another Three Men and a Baby are going to be sorely disappointed: For such a frivolous image and goofy title, this is serious stuff. Wilder plays a comic strip artist who finds he's really, really anxious to have a kid. Unfortunately, things don't quite click biologically with his new wife (Christine Lahti), and after years of trying, they call it quits -- not just on the baby, but on the marriage too.

Continue reading: Funny About Love Review

At Close Range Review


Weak
Christopher Walken's hair and bushy mustache almost make the maudlin At Close Range worth watching, but not quite. Sean Penn plays Walken Jr. here in what ought to be a meeting of great Method actors but turns out to be a stillborn dud. Dad's a gangster, son wants to work for pa (and doesn't know he's a crook), and slowly gets pulled into his increasingly violent world. A real mess ensues (as occured in the real-life story on which the film is based), and in the end we all leave the film feeling so depressed we're ready to commit suicide.

Some Kind of Wonderful Review


Good
John Hughes isn't best known for Some Kind of Wonderful, but ode to highschool misfits has its adherants, and sure enough it's one of his more grounded and lovable films.

Not as depressing as Pretty in Pink, not as random as The Breakfast Club, the film is a typical Hughesian love triangle among the short-haired semi-butch drummer girl (Mary Stuart Masterson), the sensitive (yet poor) painter (Eric Stoltz), and the class beauty who doesn't have money but runs in rich circles (Lea Thompson). Masterson clearly pines for her best friend Stoltz, but he either can't see it or won't see it. Besides, Thompson has perfectly '80s red hair. Naturally, the beefy, Miami Vice-dressing boyfriend (Craig Sheffer) wants nothing more than to pummel the guy who's pining for his lady.

Continue reading: Some Kind of Wonderful Review

The Florentine Review


Grim
The Florentine has that desperate desire to be Reservoir Dogs, with a rogues' gallery of ex-cons, mobsters, and sad sacks all trying to make a go at life and intersecting at their favorite bar. Alas, few of their stories are worth paying much attention to, though James Belushi is (unintentionally) hysterical as a scam artist taking advantage of poor Luke Perry.
Mary Stuart Masterson

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